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CALIFORNIA 
SOU THLAND 




No. 37 JANUARY, 1923 20 Cents 

CALIFORNIA'S HOME AND GARDEN MAGAZINE 





Art in a Noble 

Enduring- 

Form 



Your own love of the artistic 
will find expression in a 
noble and enduring form 
through the possession of tiny- 
specimen of Rookwood Pot- 
tery. * Rookwood is handled 
exclusively in Los Angeles by 
Brock & Company. 



IN this exquisite Rookwood vase you find vis- 
ualized the concept of a truly artistic imag- 
ination, worked out with infinite patience 
and devotion. Its creator knew his oriental 
potter's lore, reflected as it is in the distinctly 
Chinese contour of the vase. He knew, too, how 
to get marvelously soft and mellifluous tints by 
coloring the clay while still soft and then burn- 
ing over it a porcelain glaze. 

He was left free to execute his design precisely 
as he had conceived it, knowing that the tradi- 
tional policy of Rookwood is to allow its artists 
the utmost individuality, and to protect them 
fully against any duplication of their work. 



Visitors JVelcome. 

Brock 6 Company 

515 West Seventh Street 

~5etween Olive and Gr<and~ 




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CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




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SCOFIELD ENGINEERING-CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE APPLIED TO CONSTRUCTION 

Los Angeles Biltmore Hotel under Construction 




Lasting Beauty 

The Face Brick to be supplied 
by this company for the new Bilt- 
more Hotel will fill one of the 
largest orders for Face Brick ever 
placed on the Pacific Coast. 

L. A.Pressed Brick Co. 

ENTIRE SIXTH FLOOR -FROST BLOC 
Second and Broadway 
Phones MainSol - 6o48<> 



Pacific-Southwest s Bank 

FORMERLY LOS ANGELES TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 



Affiliated in ownership wit/i The First 
National Bank of Los Angeles and the 
First Securities Company 

Serving the Pacific Southwest through many 
conveniently located branches in Los Angeles and 
in the following California cities: 



Alhambra 
Carpinteria 
Catalina Island 
P'resno, Fidelity Br. 
Glendale, 

Glenda'.e Ave. Br. 

Brand Blvd. Br. 
Guadalupe 
Hanford 

Huntington Beach 
Huntington Park 
Lindsay 
Lompoc 
Long Beach 

Long Beach Br. 

Belmont Heights Br. 

Atlantic Avenue Br. 
Los Alamos 
Ocean Park 
Orcutt 



Oxnard 
Pasadena 

Pasadena Br. 

Oak Knoll Br. 

Altadena Br. 
Redlands 
San Fernando 
San Pedro 

Marine Branch 
Santa Barbara 

Commercial and Santa 

Barbara Br. 
Santa Maria 
Santa Monica 
Tulare 
Venice 
Visalia 
Whittier 

Community Branch 
Wilmington 




4 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



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I SOUTHLAND I 
I CALENDAR 



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Announcements of exhibitions, fetes, 
concerts, club entertain men ts, etc., for 
the calendar pages are free of charge and 
ihould be received in the office of Cali- 
kornia Southland, Pasadena, at least 
two weeks previous to date of issue. No 
corrections can be guaranteed if they are 
received later than that date. 

The public is warned that photog- 
raphers have no authority to arrange for 
sittings, free of charge or otherwise, for 
publication in Southland unless appoint- 
ments have been made especially in writ- 
ing by the Editor. 

Clubs 

VALLEY HUNT CLUB: 
" Regular Sunday evening programs have 
been resumed for the winter, with Monday 
afternoon bridge, and bridge teas. January 
12th. dinner dance ; January 19th. piano 
recital. Miss Marsh. 

A NNANDALE GOLF CLUB, Wednesday, 
January 10th. First afternoon bridge 
and tea party of the season. These after- 
noon bridge and tea parties will continue 
every Wednesday during the season. 
Saturday, January 20th, dinner dance. 
Thursday, January 25th, musicale. 
The usual Wednesday and Saturday Ball 
Sweepstakes during the month of January. 

J^LINTRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies' Day has been changed from 
Monday to the first Tuesday in every 
month. On every Ladies' Day the 
women golfers from the clubs in the 
Southern California Association will 
be welcome. 

COUTHERN CALIFORNIA OPEN GOLF 
^ CHAMPIONSHIP, under the auspices 
of the Southern California Profes- 
sional Golfers' Association, January 
21-24. 

| OS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies Days, second Monday of each 
month. 

Music during dinner, followed by 
dancing, every Saturday evening 
during the month. 

Luncheon served from 11:30 to 2 
p. m. on Saturdays. 

Sunday night concerts during month 
twice a month. 

Tea served as requested and tables 
for cards always available. 

ILSHIRE COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies' Days, third Monday of each 
month. 

Dancing every second and fourth 
Saturdays during the month. 
A musical is arranged for each Sun- 
day night in the month. 

lytlDWICK COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies' Days, fourth Monday in each 
month. 

Tea and informal bridge every after- 
noon. 

Polo, Wednesday and Saturday of 
each week. 

Dancing every Saturday night in the 
month. 

T OS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB: 

Dinner dances, Tuesday and Friday 
nights of every week. Tuesday night 
informal ; Friday night semi-formal. 
Plunge open to the ladies Tuesday and 
Friday of every week. 

TV/TONTECITO COUNTRY CLUB: 

Provides an 18 hole golf course, two 
concrete and two dirt courts for ten- 
nis, bowls and croquet. 
Tea is served and informal bridge 
parties arranged as desired. 
A buffet supper is served every Sun- 
day night. 

EWPORT HARBOR YACHT CLUB: 
At the annual election, December 9, 
the following fla*i officer* were elected 
for the next year: Shirley E. Meserve, 
Commodore ; W. Starbuck Fenton, 
Vice Commodore; William Warming- 
ton, Rear Commodore ; Leon S. Hese- 
man. Secretary and Treasurer. 
The Inaugural Ball will be held at the 
Club House, Saturday evening. Jan- 
uary 13, dinner at 6.30. Installation 
of new officers. Service Knot will be 
presented to outgoing Commodore, 
Frank Smith. 

A dinner and smoker* will be given 
January 7th by the American Power 
Boat Racing Association. Frank 
Smith, presiding, in honor of World's 
speed boat champion. Gar Wood, and 
Mr. Chapman, Secretary of the Amer- 
ican Power Boat Association, and 
editor of the Motor Boat Magazine. 



W 



N 



Art 



THK Fourth International Print Makers' 
Exhibition, under the auspices of the 
Print Makers' Society of California, will 
be held in the Los Aneeles Museum, 
March 1 to 31. An invitation is extended 




In the Entrance Court on Seventh Street, 
Los Angeles 



Caniull 6$ Ctjaftut, ant. 

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Clothes unique in their spirited interpretation of 
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S a t u r d a y s 



to all workers in etching, lithography, 
block printing and engraving to send not 
more than four examples of their work, 
the same to be received at the Museum 
not later than February 7. The jury of 
selection is made up of Howell C. Brown, 
secretary, Benjamin Brown, Frances 
Gearhart, John W. Cotton and Loren Bar- 
ton. 

AT the recent election of the California 
Art Club the following men and 
women were chosen for the coming year: 

President, Dana Bartlett ; first vice- 
president, Alson Clark; second. Jack 
Wilkinson Smith; secretary. John Coo- 
lidge ; recording secretary, Edouard Vyse- 
kal : treasurer, Ernest Browning Smith ; 
chairman house committee, Laura Steere ; 
chairman entertainment committee, Kath- 
ryn Leighton ; chairman exhibition com- 
mittee, E. Roscoe Shrader; chairman pub- 
licity, Henri De Kruif. 

The art jury on paintings for exhibi- 
tion, John Hubbard Rich, Jack Wilkinson 
Smith. Hanson Puthutr, Alson Clark, Wil- 
liam Wendt, Dana Bartlett, J. Duncan 
Gleason, Clarence H inkle, Ernest Brown- 
ing Smith. Alternative, Luvena Buckban 
Vysekal, Carl Oscar Borg, Paul Lauritz. 

An interesting program will be given at 
the next meeting of the California Art 
Club, January 6. Serefine Pia, baritone, 
will give a selection of Spanish songs, des- 
cribing the section of the country in 
which they were written, and make clear 
the meaning of the songs. Paul Swan, 
who came to Los Angeles recently from 
New York, will talk on the relation of the 
arts. 

THE midwinter exhibition and sals of 

* pictures of the California Water Color 
Society will be held at the Franklin Gal- 
leries, Hollywood, beginning January 4, 
and continuing throughout the month. A 
reception will be given for the artists and 
the public on Thursday evening, January 
4. 

pAUL LAURITZ held two shows 
A throughout December, in Los Angeles, 
showing ten snow scenes from Alaska at 
tKe Ebell Cluh, and recent pictures of 
Southern California mountains at the 
Athletic Club. 

THE Group of Independents have post- 
poned their exhibition, announced for 
the MaeDowell Club on December 11, until 
February 1. The postponement was made 
to allow time for recent applicants for 
membership to submit their canvases. 

HpHE date allotted by the MaeDowell Club 
to the Independents was taken by 
three exhibitors, Mary Teasdale, Adolphe 
Brougier and Alice Daniels. 

TACK WILKINSON SMITH held an ex- 
" hibition at the Hollywood Woman's 
Club in December, consisting entirely of 
pictures of Southern California, including 
high Sierra subjects and marines. Mr. 
Smith won the capital prize at a recent 
general exhibition in Phoenix, Arizona, 
and the picture was bought for the per- 
manent gallery in Phoenix. 

HPHK California Art Club's proposed gal- 
lery may be built at an earlier date 
than the most optimistic had hoped, the 
proceeds of the sale of paintings, which 
were exhibited on West Seventh street 
during December, go to the building fund, 
and cash sums have been received from in- 
terested friends, while others have made 
themselves life members of the club by 
subscribing $100. On the evening of Fri- 
day, January 26, the use of the Philhar- 
monic Auditorium will be given to the 
Art Club for a concert, to be arranged by 
Mrs. Sloane-Orcutt and L. E. Behymer. 
Tickets range in price from $1.50 to fifty 
cents and may be had at the leading art 
and music stores in Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena. 

rpHE Canneli and Chaffin Galleries will 
" hold an exhibition of pictures, fur- 
niture and tapestries, in the Art Gallery 
in Balboa Park. San Dieco, January 9 to 
February 4. Cuthbert Human, art cur- 
ator, will be in charge. 

pAUL SWAN, a painter and sculptor, 

* recently from New York, is exhib- 
iting six portraits in the Kanst Galleries. 

JOHN W. COTTON is exhibiting etch- 
ings, many of which are in color, in 
the Stendahl print room. Ambassador 
Hotel. The exhibition will continue 
through January and every afternoon the 
artist will demonstrate the printing of 
etchings, and on Tuesday and Friday at 
three o'clock will give a brief talk on the 
processes of the art. 

SILAS DUSTIN recently resigned the 
position of curator of the National 
Academy of Design, and has decided to 
make his home in Los Angeles. . He will 
take charge of the pictures at Stendahl*. 
which should be very gratifying to the ar- 
tists of California as he ha* the reputa- 
tion of being a wonderful seller of pic- 
tures. 

DROBABLY the most notable exhibi- 
*■ tion of the season was that of Wil- 
liam Ritschel, N. A., at Canneli and 
Chaftin's during December. The exhibi- 
tion included two California pictures but 
was primarily composed of the oils and 
water colors done by Mr. Ritschel during 
hi* recent stay in the island* of the South 
Seas. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



5 



VI7-ILLIAM WENDT, A. N. A., prize 
winner at the Los Angeles Museum 
and at the Art Institute, Chicago, is now 
sketching: in the country around San Juan 
Capistrano. 

T^AVID ANTHONY TAUSZKY an- 
nounces an exhibition of portraits, re- 
cently painted in Pasadena, at the Can- 
nell and Chaffin Gallerie3, Los Angsle.3, 
January 3 to January 15. 

"CMVE exhibitions opened in the gal- 
leries of the Los Angeles Museum, 
December 14, to continue to January 2. A 
second show of works by the Art Teach- 
ers Association of Southern California, 
including' paintings, drawings and craft 
objects. One-man shows by four paint- 
ers ; Jean Mannheim shows eleven land- 
scapes, figures and marine.*. John Coolidge 
has nineteen paintings in oil. Peter 
Krasnow has eleven studies, and E. Roscoe 
Shrader has ten landscapes and figures. 
BEGINNING December 24, the Sten- 
dahl Galleries announce an exhibition 
and sale of oil paintings by Elmer E. 
Garn^ey. Mr. Garnsey is best known as a 
mural painter but is showing landscapes 
at this time. 

ALSON S. CLARK will hold an exhi- 
bition of his recently completed work 
at Stendahl's, in the Ambassador Hotel, 
beginning January 1, and continuing one 
month. 

ip ARL STENDAHL announce? the open- 
ing of an additional gallery in the 
Hotel Vista del Arroyo, Pasadena, Jan- 
uary 1. 

"TJ WIGHT BRIDGES has announced an 
exhibition of portraits in the Cannell 
and Chaffin Galleries, Los Angeles, Feb- 
ruary 15 to March 1. 

HpHE Editor of California Southland 
has recently been made an honorary 
members of the Community Arts Associa- 
tion of Santa Barbara, and also of the Cali- 
fornia Art Club of Los Angeles. 
pASADENA Artists' and Students' 
League have resumed classes after the 
holidays, in the Sticknev Memorial Build- 
ing, 303 No. Fair Oaks Ave., and an- 
nounce life classes, Tuesday, Wednesday 
and Thursday, 1:30 to 4:00. and 7:00 to 
10 :00 P. M. . Children's class Saturday, 
9:00 A. M. 

rpHE gallery of the Santa Barbara 
School of the Arts has received a new 
picture by Sacks, acadamicien of Phila- 
delphia and graduate of the Beaux Arts 
in Paris. Sacks has come to Southern 
California to live and has taken studio* 
in Santa Barbara. His picture in the 
school gallery is of a lady in a remark- 
ably vivid and striking red dress. It is 
a portrait and is causing much comment 
among art students who have visited 
Santa Barbara from Pasadena and Los 
Angeles. 



M, 



1US1C 

TTNDER the auspices of the Pasadena 
^ Music and Art Association, the Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles. Wal- 
ter H. Roth well, Conductor, will give the 
second of a series of concerts at the High 
School Auditorium, Pasadena. February 
15. Theo. Karle will be the soloist. 
HpHE Los Angeles Chamber Music So- 
ciety will present the fifth program at 
the Gamut Club Theatre, Friday evening, 
January 5, at 8:15. 

rpHE artists presented by L. E. Behymer 
during January in the Mid-Winter 
Philharmonic Courses include Madame 
Emma Calve. Prima Dona Soprano, Sat- 
urday matinee, Januarv 6, and Tuesday 
evening. January 9. The Irish Regiment 
Band, evening concert, January 12. and 
matinee concert, January 13 and 14. 
Mischa Elman, evening concert, January 
23, and matinee concert, January 27. Sir 
Harry Lauder Co., week, January 29. 
Serge Rachmaninoff, evening, February 2. 
rpHE Philharmonic Orchestra, Walter 
Henry Rothwell, Conductor, will give 
a concert in Redlands, Tuesday evening. 
January 2, under the auspices of the 
Spinet Club. Olga Steeb is to be the 
soloist. 

T>EGINNING February 12 the San Carlo 
Opera Company is scheduled to give 
Los Angeles a two weeks' season of opera, 
at the Philharmonic Auditorium. 
rpHE dates for the January concerts of 
the Philharmonic Orchestra. Philhar- 
monic Auditorium, Los Angeles, are as 
follow : 

Sunday afternoon popular concerts : Jan- 
uary 7 and 21. 

Friday afternoon, January 12, and Sat- 
urday evening, January 13. 

Friday afternoon, January 26, and Sat- 
urday evening, January 27. 
I'PHE Fitzgerald Concert Direction, Merle 
Armitage. Manager, will present Er- 
win Nyiregyhazi, pianist, in concert at 
the Philharmonic Auditorium, Los An- 
gele?, in January. 

JOHN SMALLMAN announces January 
12 as the date of his annual Los An- 
geles recital, postponed from December 7. 
Mr. Smallman will include in his program 
three songs by compo-ers resident in 
Southern California, "Circle", by Mrs. 
Hennion Robinson, "In the Lodge of the 
Sioux", by Homer Grunn, and a new song 
by Arthur Farwell. 





Marshall Laird 



Specialising in the 
reproduction of the fine r 
Spanish, Italian and Cng/ish 
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WORK SHOP: 

416 East Ninth Street 



LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA 



I^HE second concert of a series of five to 
be given by the Women's Club of the 
University of Southern California will be 
given January 12 in Bovard Auditorium. 
Los Angeles. Madame Emma Calve, so- 
prano, is the artist. 

/CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN and 
^ Princess Tsianina have completed a 
concert tour of the East and will ap- 
pear in Los Angeles at the Philharmonic 
Auditorium, Thursday evening, January 
11; in Long Beach, January 16; Santa 
Barbara, January 17, and Whittier, Jan- 
uary 19. 

TN order to create and promote interest 
in the concerts of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra, there have been appointed local 
boards, assistants to the Los Angeles man- 
agement. On these are the following per- 
sons, active in music in their own com- 
munities : 

Pasadena Mrs. Frank Gates Allen, 
chairman ; Mrs. Howard Huntington, Ar- 
thur Dodworth and Mrs. Frederick Stev- 
ens. 

San Diego — Gertrude Gilbert, chairman ; 
John H. Hamilton, John D. Spreckels, G. 
Aubrey Davidson, Humphrey J. Stewart, 
George W. Marston, Willet S. Dorland, 
Alfred D. La Motte. 

Hollywood — Mrs. Cecil Frankel, chair- 
man ; Mrs. R. D. Shepherd and Mrs. Jos- 
eph J. Carter. 

Santa Monica — Mrs. Percy Browne, 
chairman ; Mrs. James Westervelt, Mrs. 
George H. Hutton, Dr. H. W. Levengood 
and I. C. Speers. 

Redlands — Mrs. E. B. Patterson, chair- 
man : Mrs. A. D. Hubbard, Mrs. Paul 
Moore and Mrs. Samuel S. Sewell. 

Riverside — Mrs. J. W. B. Merriman, 
chairman; Mrs. E. R. Skelley, Mrs. Wm. 
A. MacDonald. Monica Railsbaik and Ar- 
thur L. Bostick. 




Announcements 

rpHE Observatory on Mt. Wilson is open 
to visitors every Friday evening at 
7 :30. The huge 100 inch reflecting telescope 
is in reality a giant camera, not used so 
much in making observations as in photo- 
graphing the heavens, but the impressive 
bulk may be viewed in day time. A good 
mountain hotel is operated on Mt. Wilson, 
and may be leached by stage, every day 
while the road is open. The drivers are 
experienced and the road is good. Hiking 
parties go up the trail from Sierra Madre. 

r)R. W. W. CAMPBELL, director of the 
^ Lick Observatory at Mt. Hamilton, 
Cal., was definitely selected as the new 
president of the University of California 
by the executive committee of the board 
of regents, which met in private session 
January 2. 

AN exhibition of the work of the South- 
ern California chapter of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Architects and of the 
Architectural Club will be held during 
the entire month of January at the art 
gallery of the Museum building at Exposi- 
tion Park. While the exhibit will be 
primarily an exhibit of the work of the 
local chapter of the Institute of Archi- 
tects, members of the Architectural Club 
will be urged to exhibit. 

The exhibit will consist of all classes of 
work, covering buildings erected during 
the past three years. 

/COMMUNITY Arts Association of Santa 
Barbara announce : 
Sunday, January 7, 3 :30 P. M. — Com- 
munity Arts Orchestra Concert — Recreation 
Center. 

Friday evening and Saturday afternoon 
and evening, January 12 and 13. "Enter 
Madame," Community Arts Players ; Potter 
Theater. 

Tuesday, January 16. at 4:00 P. M. — 
Membership Meeting. Recreation Center. 
Austin Adams will speak on "Modern Ten- 
dencies of the Drama". 

Sunday. January 21, 3:30 P. M. — Com- 
munity Arts Orchestra Concert— Recrea- 
tion Center: Soloist: Bertha Svedrofsky, 
Violinist 

I/ENNETH A. GARDNER and Nthan- 
iel E. Slaymaker announce that they 
have opened an office for the practice of 
landscape architecture at 721 Timk n 
Building, San Diego, California. 

They are prepared to undertake the de- 
signing of gardens and grounds for coun- 
try and suburban home*, also for estates 
and institutions ; the laying out of real 
estate developments and land subdivisions ; 
town and regional planning, with especial 
reference to zoning ; the designing of 
parks, playgrounds, school grounds and 
civic centres. 



CALIFORNIA SOU T II L A N /) 



For Your Convenience 

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All Important Southern 
California Cities 

Within Radius of 75 Miles 
of Los Angeles 



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PHOTOGRAPHS OK DISTINCTION 
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California Southland 



M. Urmy Seares 

Ellen Leech - 


Editor and Publisher 
- Assistant Editor 


No. 37 


JANUARY. 1923 




CONTENTS 



PACE 

The Biltmore, Los Angeles Cover Design 

(Schnltze and Wearer, Architects) 
The Library, Pomona College Contents Design 

(Pencil Drawing by W • A. Sharp) 

Beauty and Environment Ralph D. Cornell 

Good Practice in Gardens Nathaniel E. Slaymaker 

The End of the Pasear Virginia Calhoun 

Professional Service and Building M. Urmy Seares 

A Castle in Spain — Riverside France* Matilda Purely 



Southland Opinion 14-15 

The Southland as Host Ellen Leech 16 

Recent Books — Reviews E. Taylor Houghton 18 

California Homes and Gardens 19 

The Earwig Cyril Carpenter, F.E.S. 20 

Wrought Iron as a Craft Georgia Nieman 21 

In Search of a Homesite — San Gabriel VALLEY 23 

Some Southland Batik Margaret Craig 24 

The Money Market Leslie B. Henry 26 

CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND is published monthly at Pasadena, Cal. 

One dollar and twenty cents for six issues, two dollars for tivelve 
For extra copies or back numbers call Main 408i, L. A. News Co. 
Copyright. 1922, by II. Urmy Scares 
Entered as second class matter. July 28, 1919, at the Post Office at Pasadena, 
California, under Act of March 3, 1879. 




History of California 
The American Period 

By Robert G. Cleland 

Is ready and completes our 
history of the state. The first 
volume is 

History of California 
The Spanish Period 

By Charles E. Chapman 
Price $4.00 each 

THE MACMILLAN CO. 
Publishers, San Francisco 



WlSSAHICKON INN 

Red lands, California 

At the Wissahickon Inn. a fam- 
ily hotel of fifty rooms, you will 
find a homelike place, good food, 
and careful attention to your 
wants. 

Steam heat, rooms with private 
bath and plenty of public baths. 
Cottages on the grounds. Near 
parks. Country Club and Munici- 
pal Golf Course. Tennis court. 
Ma ^nificent roads for motoring. 

For reservation and prices, ad- 
dress 

MRS. A. B. JOHNSON. 



Hillcrest Tea House 

I nvites Youi Patronage 
Luncheon and Dinners 
By Appointment 

Phone 1766 San Dimas, Calif. 



La Solano 



A quiet, well-appointed smalt 
hotel on the West Side near 
OraiK/e Grove Avenue. 



Expert 
Service 



Grand Ave. and Lockhaven St. 



THE HILL CREST TEA HOUSE AT SAN DIMAS. WHERE THE FOOTHILLS 
AND VALLEY MEET AND THE SAN (JA URIEL RIVER COMES THROUGH THE 

MOUNTAINS. 



Hawaii The Orient 

TRAVEL? 

TRAVEL SERVICE BUREAU 
Tickets to All the World" 

307 So. Spring St.. Los Angeles 

Alexandria Hotel Bldg. Main 4 10 
Raymond and Whitcomb Tours 



South America 



Europa 




CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF NATIONAL INTEREST 



BEAUTY AS A FACTOR IN EDUCATION 

<By RALPH D- CORNELL, SMaster in Landscape Architecture. 
Illustrations in Lead Pencil by W. A. Sharp 



v 

■ is 





V 



ALL man kind responds, either consciously or unconsciously, to the 
beauty of surroundings. As we are nourished, so we develop, 
and high fruition of character cannot be expected from a meagre life 
that has been denied the elements of beauty during its years of 
growth. 

Beauty is a qualita- 
tive attribute, the per- 
ception or recognition of 
which creates pleasure 
for its beholder. It has 
been denned as "complete 
unity of organization" 
with its opposite, ugli- 
ness, as "lack of unity"; 
but there is not space, in 
this article, for discus- 
sion of the abstract qual- 
ities of beauty nor even 
for the psychological rea- 
sons why it is pleasura- 
ble to perceive beauty. 
The reader will, however, 
probably grant this first 
premise that beauty is a 
source of pleasure to 
those who perceive it, 
even though there may 
be a difference of opin- 
ion, by individuals and 
communities, as to what 
is beautiful. 

The perception and ap- 
preciation of beauty is 
largely a matter of ex- 
perience, and it is through 
the experiences of an in- 
dividual or a community 
that individual or com- 
munity tastes are devel- 
oped. A man may set out 
consciously to develop his 
taste and his apprecia- 
tion of beauty and thus 
actually increase his ca- 
pacity for such pleasure, 
but, in the main, the 
processes of such devel- 
opment are effected with- 
out consciousness of 
change in the individual, 
coming about through 
personal experiences of 
beautiful things; that is, taste and the capacity for the appreciation 
of beauty generally evolve as a slow, normal development of which 
the individual is not consciously aware at the time. 

On the other hand bad taste may develop as readily as good taste, 
and it, too, grows from the experiences through which one passes and 
from the environment in which one lives. The development of differ- 
ent tastes is well exemplified in the many different schools of art 
which have flourished throughout the ages and which continue to 
exist, many of them in complete contradiction to one another. History 
records eras of high civilization and development in the arts, and 
times when entire nations have fallen into decadent concepts, of art, 
of beauty. The taste of the individual is largely influenced by that 
of the community in which he dwells and by the experiences that 
comes as a result of his life in the community which he serves. 




Hp 



'II 



THE TOWER OF THE NEW HALL OF CHEMISTRY, POMONA COLLEGE, WHICH HAS JUST 
BEEN COMPLETED. JAMIESON AND SPEARL, ARCHITECTS. 



Thus it is that the youth of any land grow up with all their future 
development and acpacity for joyousness toned by the background 
of experiences through which they pass in their years of growth; and 
they, in turn, express, through their own selection of pleasures, the 

environment from which 
they come. It is the con- 
currence of opinion, of 
tastes, of ideas that de- 
velops community cohe- 
sion to the point of cen- 
sorship of the minority 
members who do not ac- 
cord with the general, ac- 
cepted standards. In 
other words, it is very 
difficult to escape the in- 
fluence of environment, 
either of our animate or 
inanimate surroundings. 
The significance of this 
fact is recognized even in 
the raising of dumb ani- 
mals; and why not in 
that of children? 

Our students of crime 
and its palliatives have 
long since agreed that 
conditions of filth and 
darkness and ugliness 
and the bringing of such 
things into our homes 
through the papers, are 
abettors of criminal ten- 
dencies: that cleanliness 
and sunlight and beauty 
in both physical and 
mental food and sur- 
roundings reduce not 
only the tendency but the 
actual occurrence of 
crime. No one will dis- 
pute that a child reared 
under the tender influ- 
ences of a refined home 
has far greater likeli- 
hood of normal develop- 
ment and capacity for 
the enjoym ent of the 
beautiful than has the 
unfortunate youngster 
whose life has been emp- 
ty of beautiful experi- 
ences and whose mental food is picked up in the streets. Our schools, 
as our homes, influence strongly the future life into which the younger 
generations develop, and I strongly feel that the institutions of higher 
learning might bear a higher relation to the spiritual and aesthetic 
education of those who attend them than any other experience through 
which the individual may pass. 

There is an unsual opportunity for the display and influence of 
beauty, in many forms, by the college that takes our youth close to 
its heart for four years of life at a time when he is developing the 
most rapidly, when he is probably more susceptible to impressions, 
good or bad, than during any other four years of his unfolding growth. 
Surely one would not recommend sordid, unbeautiful surroundings 
for such a period; and by the law of opposites alone, the value of 
beauty rises to unknown heights. There may be the beauty of faith 




i 



8 



CALIFORNIA S O U T II L A N D 



1=3-. — . ^v.i„, 1 



THE SCHKME FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MAKSTON O.UADRANGLE. POMONA COLLEGE, THE 
GRADING FOR WHICH IS UNDER WAY AT THE PRESENT TIME. RALPH D. CORNELL & THEORORE 

PAYNE, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. 

rU_ ^r^nnicK ^ ee brown leaflet, blown into this wor Id By MARGARET 

1 I1C ^pdlllbll By winds of cham ( MAIDA RICE 

IVlotHcT g Nestled by the breezes where 

L.. | The sunbeams dance, 

ullclbyC Crooning by thy cradle I would 

Ever be. 

While my heart stands still in wonderment 
To worship thee. 
Sleep, leaflet, sleep. 



and teaching, of friendship and intellectual 
companionship, the beauty of good books, of 
exquisite sculpture, of painting, of architec- 
ture, of attractive campus with trees and 
flowers. 

Nowhere have I seen a quotation that so 
well voices this thought of beauty, as it should 
be applied to the environment of schools, as do 
the words of Hartley B. Alexander, Ph. D., 
Head of the Philosophy Department, Univer- 
sity of Nebraska, in his "Letters to Teachers." 
He says: 

"In the first place I would have the school 
buildings, if not monumental, at all events 
beautiful in form and proportion and attrac- 
tive in site; for I am a firm believer in the 
power of noble architecture to inspire noble 
thinking. . . . Architectural quality should be 
a prime requisite of every public building and 
most of all of educational buildings, where the 
whole spirit of the State is being formed. But 
architecture must be appropriately seated, and 
my second demand (not less imperative than 
the first) is that every school yard should be 
a garden. I do not mean a vegetable garden 
(though in cities space for even that is worth 
while), but I do mean a garden of trees and 
shrubs and flowers, and above all, a garden 
for the bright faces of children and youth — an 
embowered playground. The seat of the most 
famous of all universities, the Academy of 
Plato, was a grove; and nowhere should a fane 
of education be erected in less devoted sur- 
roundings. Every school yard should be famed 
for its elms and oaks, its lilacs and roses; 
since the beauty of architecture is never per- 
fect save it be set in the friendly context of 
the beauty of nature — nor, I think, is it far 
fetched to suppose that the subtle lesson of 
the interdependence of man and nature may 
be first impressed by his outward symbol. At 
any rate, beautiful groves have always seemed 
to men, sacred." 

It is hard to imagine a clime more sunny or 
a setting more perfect in which to mount the 
jewel of education, than is to be found in 
California. The natural beauty of plant life 
may be developed here without having to over- 
come the handicaps of a rigorous climate. The 
gems of architecture may be placed in their 
setting of perpetual green, and the garden 
embellishments of the campus developed to 
their highest perfection. Doubly emphatic 
then, is the obligation resting upon the col- 
leges and universities of this state. 

Education is not alone a matter of books; 
it is a matter of experience. Eooks record the 
experiences of others, co-relate them, com- 
press them and bring them to us that we may 
profit, through such short-cut methods by muc h 
that has gone before; they open great riches 
to lovers of beauty. But beauty in surround- 
ings, — in all things — is an invaluable factor in 
education, for it is absorbed unconsciously by 
the receptive student and makes up the very 
fiber of his character — the indefinable some- 
thing which he will carry with him through 
life. 

(The illustrations for this article are from 
the Campus of Pomona College, Claremont, 
California, an institution that has specially 
emphasized the aesthetic element in the con- 
struction of its campus and buildings. This 
element has been sustained even in such a 
building as the neiv Hall of Chemistry, noiv 
under construction, and in the development of 
the College Central Quadrangle, which is being 
made possible through the generous gifts of 
Mr. George W. Marston, of San Diego. Mr. 
Cornell is himself a graduate of this college.) 



Oh, babe, with eyes ivhere lies romance 

f ages past ! 

I nknown to thee, what magic fate thy tiny 

1 cat ii res cast! 

I I nknown the love in my brown eyes 

So like to thine. 
I r nknown my dreams for thee of future 
Fortunes fine. 
Sleep, leaflet, sleep. 



Sleep, brown leaflet, soft within my arms 

Thy dusky head; 
Sleep, brown leaflet, stranger soul , 

By my love led. 
Uncertain now, unknowing, you embody 

All my past, 
Dreams come to earth and taken form in you — 

Made flesh at last! 
Sleep, leaflet , sleep. 



•UP ^ ; 
W - (■<■' 



NATURAL BEAUTY FROM BLANCH ARD PARK, POMONA COLLEGE. MT. BALDY IN THE DISTANCE. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



9 



GOOD PRACTICE IN GARDENS 



% NATHANIEL E. SLAYMAKER 

PART II. ?A Paper Read Before San Diego Clubs 



THE discussion published in the preceeding issue of California 
Southland brought us to the question of what among all the pos- 
sibilities mentioned there you really ought to have in an aver- 
age city garden. Some sort of paths, carefully and judiciously laid 
out we must take for granted. Of the other items enumerated, I 
would say that some form of pleasant retreat or seat, arbor or the 
like is almost obligatory in any well intentioned garden. Equal in 
importance for Southern California gardens is the sight, and even 
the sound of water in some form, be it lily pool or bird-bath. A 
sense of peaceful, cool refreshment comes oftener from the presence 
of water in a garden than from almost any other feature. 

Finally, it is to the presence of a well defined boundary line "a 
visible mark indicating a limit" as some one so well said, or in other 
words, to the presence of a real garden wall, that a well-studied gar- 
den owes almost all its comfort, its privacy, its liveableness, its dis- 
play of personal taste and charm. In our country we are gradually 
learning to live outdoors more and more, and consequently we need 
an outdoor living room. The garden is replacing the piazza or ver- 
andah or balcony as the scene of many outdoor family activities, even 
to the eating of meals al fresco, and too much applause cannot pos- 
sibly be lavished on this happy, beautiful habit. But in order to have 
this so, you need the garden wall, and it makes not the slightest 
difference whether the house architect or the garden architect or just 
the householder builds it, so long as in doing so,- he conforms to the 
materials and style of the house proper and keeps it simple and 
straightforward. 

The garden wall of course, involves garden gates and entrance. 
This topic must be eliminated entirely from this paper. 

How often it happens that there are all the prescribed ingred- 
ients, walks, pool, arbor, even flowers andj vines, galore and yet no 
real garden. Does this not show how fine, how exact, how tasteful an 
art gardening is? A garden must have an atmosphere like a success- 
ful room and it depends just as much on the personal equation, ev- 
erything else being equal. Perhaps the mention of a few things not 
to do will help us get some real garden atmosphere into our outdoor 
living rooms. 

Don't spend your money on samples of all kinds and descrip- 
tions of garden ornament, stationary or moveable, but rather aim at 
a scarcity of such items. Restfulness and poise cannot be got in a 
garden that prickles with competing points of interest. Don't strive 
too hard for a special "effect" in a city yard, even though it be per- 
fectly proper to build your yard around a fine tree as a focal point, 
or a little loggia, or a pool or a charming vista that begins in your 
garden and leads off into the canyon or valley beyond and below you. 
If you do a straightforward thing like any of these, simply, you will 
have all the effect you want in "an art which conceals art". Don't 
let your house or garden wall seem to be distinct and separate from 
the lawn or garden proper, but relate them each to the other closely 
by the use of vines and shrubbery in proper scale. The whole home- 
stead should appear as one harmonious unit, and have throughout 
the same feeling, indoors and out. 

Don't have terraces or retaining walls unless you really need 
them and they become structural; nor grottos or rock gardens 
unless nature has started one for you. "When a nook at the back 
or one side of the house suggests a garden or a retired valley, tree 
and shrub should further emphasize perfect and complete the sense 
of seclusion. A wind-swept knoll with distant views should not be 
obstructed by many trees." This is what I meant by conforming to 
nature's demands. If you plan a semi-formal lay-out, don't put it at 




PORTAL OF BRIDGES HALL. POMONA COLLEGE. BEAUTY IN ARCHI- 
TECTURE SEEN THROUGH A PLEASING ENFRAMEMENT OF FOLIAGE 
TRACERY. MYRON HUNT. ARCHITECT. 

the far end of the yard. Put it next to the house so that all the for- 
malities and straight lines are together. The farther you go from 
the house the more natural can the garden become. On the other 
hand, don't forget that a natural garden may be adjacent to a house 
if a proper binder is used, namely, vines and shrubs. Don't clutter 
up your lawn with trees and shrubs or divide it with paths; keep 
the lawn centers free and open. "The lawn should be left as large 
and unobstructed as possible. The simpler picture is the stronger 
one." The horrible San Diego habit of plumping a date palm on the 
midst of each half of front lawn, cut through its middle by a glaring 
cement walk, is indescribably bad taste. If yours is to be a formal 




ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE DECORATIVE VALUE OF PLANTING IN RELATIO N TO BUILDINGS THAT ARE NOT OF THEMSELVES ATTRACTIVE, WITH 
FOLLIAGE MASSES AS A SCREEN. THE GYMNASIUM, POMONA COLLEGE, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 



10 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



garden, however small, and they are often most delightful, keep to 
straight lines, in the main, using only geometrical curves, if at all, 
and don't mix things, binding into cement a form that is formless, 
like an irregular natural pool, for instance. On the contrary, don't 
use straight lines in a frankly informal yard, but rather adhere to 
suave, logical curved lines in moderation. Finally, and this is a topic 
so large that like the theory of design, it could only be hinted at in 
this paper, plant in masses and not in isolated specimens dotted 
about here and there. Group things, instead of scattering them, 
and relate them to the house, or garden walls or larger features in 
the lay-out. Separate flower beds in varying shapes floating about 
the lawn are an abomination to good taste. Put your flowers in 
among the shrubs or in formal borders, or mass them all irr one bed, 
formal or informal as the need may be, and closely relate it to the 
house or main scheme of design. 

There is not time to go into the subjects of color and texture at 
all, and I have only hinted at the requirements of form in design. 
But I must not close without a final "don't". I adjure those who be 
sinners in this respect, and have pink and red geraniums together, 
or pure Bougainvillea against a red house to go home and before sun- 
rise to pluck the offending plant out by the roots. I have been 
asked many times by tourists why California alone seems to offend 
in these regards. I answer that the same crime is committed in the 
name of landscape art all over the United States, only it is far moit 
noticeable in California owing to the utter profusion and great 
masses of wrongly juxtaposed colors. Back East, the sarne thing 
occurs, only it is a difference in degree, not in kind. Let's fight 
against it. There is a trade secret that I'll give you to help you. 
Whether in painting, or interior decorating, o;- costuming, or garden- 
ing, the quickest and easiest way to obviate a cla.^h of c lors is to 
insert a mass of white between them. Try it and see. 



To all home-builders I hope I have given a hint or two. It is 
necessary for them to realize that there is a science of gardening as 
well as of building in the first place. They must not feel however, 
that that fact renders the case hopeless or even very bad. I grant 
that so far people are more apt to employ experts on their houses 
than on their gardens, but a better habit is gradually forming. 
What makes the case especially hopeful for the average home-builder 
is the easy access to the many garden magazines and periodicals 
whence, if he has eyes to see and an acquisitive mind, he can get a 
good deal of expert advice without paying much for it. But let me 
say that a great deal of the unsuccess of gardening is due to the 
niggardly sums allowed for it, in comparison with the house. It 
should be a rule that to have any useful and beautiful results at all, 
not less than ten per cent of the cost of the house should be allowed 
for the garden, and more than this in most cases. A $5000.00 house 
cannot have a decent setting under $500.00, nor a $10,000.00 one 
under 1000.00, and so on. This is the irreducible minimum for a 
garden worthy the name. 

Vitel, the great French landscape architect said "A garden is a 
place arranged for promenades, at the same time for the recreation 
of the eyes. But it is also an accessory to the house, serving it as an 
accompaniment, an environment; and within certain limits, it is 
simply another apartment, an annex to the house. Therefore, how- 
can the art which built and adorned the dwelling be refused the 
right to interfere in this exterior house?" 

And Emerson said, "Though we travel the world over to find 
beauty, we must carry it with us or we find it not. The difference 
between landscape and landscape is small, but there is a great dif- 
ference in beholders. There is nothing so wonderful in any land- 
scape as the necetwity of being beautiful, under which every land- 
scape lies." 



A PASEAR THROUGH CASA ADOBE WITH SENORA DONA 
FLORENCIA DODSON DE SCHONEMAN 

[Lineal descendant of the Sepulveda and Dominguez families, two of the original six grandee families of Spanish-Colonial California.] 



A SERIAL HISTORY 



% VIRGINIA CALHOUN 



PART IX. 



I^HUS Replica Casa Adobe walls speak of that new race "along the 
Pacific where sets the sun" — their provision for carnal sustenance 
and preservation; provision against "ills that flesh is heir to;" pro- 
vision for developing, maturing, and culturing the intellect; provision 
for their economic welfare; provision for refreshment and satis- 
faction of the sensibilities by patio, garden and fountain, by ver- 
andas' windows, and doors, by the big, open, blazing-log, fireplace, 
and by music, song and dance; provision for "tired nature's sweet 
repose, blessed sleep;" provision for hospitality towards all alike — 
friends, strangers — both good and bad, both rich and poof. And yet 
with all this there might have been continuous confusion and tur- 
moil within the quadrangle-walls and in the corral, had not provision 
been made also for the developing and maturing of good motives and 
manners for the entire population of the rancho, whereby could be 
perpetuated their precious heritage of "the best mannered people 
in the world." Casa Adobe walls speak also of this provision. For 
there was the family Chapel in every well-ordered, California, 
Spanish-Colonial Casa, built either apart in the garden, or as one 
of the rooms of the quadrangle. 

La Capilla, the Chapel, of Replica Casa Adobe, is located next 
to the business office, occupying the entire right wing of el Entrada 
del Corral wall. It is the largest room in the Casa and has stained- 
glass windows. This room was the sanctuary of the home. Here 
meditations and prayer of the lowliest menial as well as the pro- 
prietors of the rancho, of all the between-people, were respected- 
strict silnce was observed. Here everybody was ranked, only as good 
or bad, according to spiritual measurement. Here exterior trappings 



Miss Virginia 
Calhoun 
oAuthor of the 
Pasear Through 
Casa Adobe 
and of the Drama 
of Ratnona, 
California's Historic 
Indian Play 




did not count, or any kind of dexterity, or superior intellectual cul- 
ture. Here their souls stood naked before God — familyized. Pos- 
sibly, here too, some drowsy souls found agreeable sleeping-quarters, 
although there was no intention for this in its erection. 

The family Chapel was always furnished to satisfy the require- 
ments of their faith with many expressions of the most exalted 
affections, according to opportunity. Sometimes the vestments and 
objects of service were valuable art works of gold and silver and 
historic tapestries, laces, and linens. Sometimes the Altar itself 
was some rare architectural deposit in marble, wood or stone, whose 
venerated personages were commemorated in the finest sculpture, 
sometimes only the rude wooden handiwork of Indians. Sometimes 
the Altar candles were of bee's wax, sometimes of tallow which ador- 
ing family energy had molded to the purpose. Upon this room the 
Senorita Donas of the Casa especially lavished their skill in fine lace 
and drawn-work, for which Spanish women have always been famous. 
According to the Church's calendar they planted the patio roses, 
carnations, lillies and hollyhocks, and so on, thus they were enabled 
to keep the Altar decorated according to the traditional flower for the 
respective feast and fast days. Here they were married according to 
the Sacrament of Matrimony, here baptized according to the Sacra- 
ment of Baptism, and here received the daily Bread of the Holy 
Eucharist, and celebrated the holy sacrifice for the Mass, for the liv- 
ing, the departed, and the departing ones. This family worship did 
not in any way conflict with the regular Sunday worship at the 
Missions, although distances and hardships were a much more serious 
matter than we of today know anything about. 

When religion becomes a recognized factor in life, calling for 
individual consideration as other essentials for our well-being, not 
only manifesting itself in general outward conduct, but demanding 
interior development, maturing, and culturing, for permanency and 
strength, then the home provides for its demands, according to con- 
sciousness of them, then a place is set apart in the home for family 
worship in the attainment of spiritual unity. 

An admirably successful combination of drawing-room, library, 
music-room, and Chapel, were realized by Madam Modjeska, at her 
mountain home, Arden, in Orange County. The large room responded 
completely satisfactorily to the specialized requirements of these 
four different, but normal phases of human experience. 

It was a bay-room, longer than wide, connecting with the re- 
mainder of her rambling bungalow which extended at right angles 
with it, on both sides, by two doors, directly opposite each other. 
Below these, about two-thirds of the central room projected down 
into the garden, its entire bay-end surrounded by small, high win- 
dows, above wall-set bookcases where were, besides a valuable library, 
stacks of play manuscripts and many trophies, records of her world- 
triumphs. As music-room, there was adequate perspective for the 
baby-grand piano, and other furniture necessary for social comity. 
The bay-windows of the opposite end of the room were practically 
against the hill. They were of the usual size and disposition of the 
ordinary bay-window, only these glowed with the rich colors of rare 
Italian stained-glass of religious subjects, and made effective reredos 
for her white marble Altar. Except during devotions the gorgeous, 
silk tapestry portiers hung in the deep arch of the window-alcove, 
curtained it'off from the rest of the room. These rich hangings she 
had made and embroidered herself. Her Altar service contained 
objects of intrinsic and historic value, though much of it she had 
made herself. The chairs by unfolding and refolding became an 
agreeable Prie-Dieu. And as in Spanish-Colonial days, her neighbors, 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



11 



near and far were invited to worship with her, especially when she 
entertained a visiting priest. Her chapel room would accommodate 
about fifty persons. 

Replica Casa Adobe would accommodate somewhat more than 
fifty, and still there would probably be worshippers, who could not 
find room inside, kneeling in veranda and patio before the Altar. 




THE OLD MISSION CHURCH, LOS ANGELES, IN THE COURT MEXICAN AND 
JAPANESE CHILDREN MEET AND PLAY TOGETHER. 

If there were no visiting Padre to officiate, the Senor Don or Senora 
Dona would lead the rancho in morning and evening devotions. 

Rancho and hacienda-house routine began when the first sunlight 
struck the Casa windows, when the Senora Dona, already up and 
dresstd would be calling — "Up, up, muchachas, muchachos, up!" 
and forthwith began the sunrise hymn, the rancho devotional of 
praise and thanksgiving, sung by all the family, old and young. 

And as the patio, corral, and fields were flooded with sunlight, 
came the Major Domo conducting the house domestics through el 
Entrada del Corral, joined by field hands, vaqueroSj shearers, all 
singing full-throated, on their way to the Chapel for early Mass, the 
first act of every new day. Afterwards, breakfast, and then all went 
to their daily tasks — singing, but now it was love song or dance. 
The missionary Padres originated the sunrise hymn-singing for the 
Indians, in the Missions and in the rancherias. It effectively dislodged 
and replaced their aboriginal song and dance. 

There was no trouble whatever about community singing, Span- 
ish-Californians attained State-wide singing. This custom continued 
in California long after the Indians and Spanish-Colonials were 
isolated from the possibility of such rancho devotions. 



During something less than one hundred years, Spanish-Colonial 
California experienced much of the magical power and charm of the 
Seraphic soul of St. Francis of Assisi. For his principle of conduct 
was his vow and his consecration of poverty, and practicalizing 
of h is Faith for all the people all the time, actually reaching their 
suffering, poverty, and ignorance with its treasure. The conquest 
of California by conversion is unique in the history of conquests 
for it was the thirst for souls of the seraphic Franciscan pioneers 
and not by massacres, and enslavement of Indians in their thirst for 
gold by conquistadores, mad with the obcession of finding the gold- 
packed domains of El Dorado, the gilded one. 

And this unquenchable thirst for souls sprang forth from St. 
Francis' renunciation of pagan riches. Ruskin in his Mornings in 
Florence, discussing Giotto's famous picture of St. Francis, says: 
"That is the meaning of St. Francis' renouncing his inheritance; 
and it is the beginning of Giotto's gospel of Works. Unless this 
hardest of deeds be done first — this inheritance of mammon and the 
world cast away — all other deeds are useless. You cannot serve, 
cannot obey, God and mammon * * * You go to church because the 
world goes. You keep Sunday because your neighbor does. You dress 
ridiculously because your neighbor asks it. You must renounce your 
neighbor, in his riches and pride, and remember him in his distress. 
This is St. Francis' 'disobedience'." (To his merchant father.) 

After thirteen hundred years, the request of the Christ of the 
rich man's son, "Give up all thou hast and follow me," was obeyed 
by a rich man's son, St. Francis of Assisi. And in his utter 
simplicity in his love for nature, and in his supreme effort in getting 
away from conventionalities and back to nature, all unconsciously, 
he created the impulse and development of modern drama, together 
with modern poetic, literary, and esthetic ideas, and which eventually 
became the distinctive characteristics of California as a State. 
Today, reminders of his spiritual achievements for us may be read 
in the names of our two leading metropolises of the west — San Fran- 
cisco, his very own name; and Nuestra Senora Reina de Los Angeles 
de Portiuncula. This name of our City was the name of his Chapel 
Portiuncula (Little Portion") set up inside of the basilica of St. 
Mary of the Angeles in Assisi, where he experienced one of his most 
precious revelations. 

For in 1769 when Junipero Serra, the seraphic Franciscan 
pioneer, accompanied by the military governor, Portola, arrived at the 
Indian village where Los Angeles is today, and proceeding, crossed 
a river where Buena Vista bridge is now located, they named the 
river, Nuestra Senora Reina de Los Angeles de Portiuncula, in mem- 
ory of St. Francis' experiences. So it was that name of our City 
was written across the waters of the river long before the royal 
charter pueblo was established there. 

And continuing on its way, this exploring processional tra- 
versed the scene, where later, Spanish-Colonial Californians, accord- 
ing to political self-determination, accepted Cahuenga Capitulations, 
allying themselves with America's destiny. Thus, in January, 1847, 
Spanish-Colonial California, officially ceased. And thereby America 
acquired new citizens whose word was as good as their bond and who 
saluted Americans worthy successors of the Spanish Dons — "Viva 
usted seguro, Senores! Y duerme usted seguro, Senores!" 

And so passed the days of the years of California Spanish- 
Colonial Mission, Casa and hut, nestling in the valleys and among 
the purple hills, of which Replica Casa Adobe is perpetual monument. 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICE AS APPLIED TO CONSTRUCTION 

M. URMY SEARES 



THE building of Los Angeles is a fasci- 
nating thing to watch no matter from 
what point of view we make our observa- 
tions. From the beginning of the old Span- 
ish Plaza to the building of the Los Angeles 
Biltmore Hotel, on Pershing Square, is one 
hundred years; and yet the city itself as a 
modern entity is not that old. Los Angeles 
is, in fact, just about reaching its maturity 
in the fruition of all the tourist activities 
which have occupied its citizens during the 
first half century of its existence. With the 
building of this new hotel begins a new 
epoch. Great financial, manufacturing, and 
building organizations, such as exist in all 
the other large cities of America, are being 
developed by the terrific task of caring for 
the overwhelming population which has 
poured into Los Angeles almost as suddenly 
as a crowd collects on the street. Public 
service corporations, striving to keep up 
with this rapid growth in population, have 
been stressed to the limit in extending their 
services so as to meet these extraordinary 
thousands. Many a fine organizer has died 
at his post as truly as did our men in France 
during the last strenuous years. These are 
not the voices calling out over the Rocky 
Mountains for more people to come out 
simply because the weather is fine. Their 
work is too absorbing; but it is their work 
which is making Los Angeles find itself as 
the up-to-date metropolis of California's 
Solid South. 

So active has been the advertising, so fast 
have the people been brought west by the 
daily railway specials, so easy has it been 
made to stay and be comfortable both in 
winter and in summer, that now the brains 




Oscar Maurrr 

THE PLAZA, LOS ANGELES. ALL OUR HISTORY AN 
ROUND POINT SHOULD BE PRESERVED 



D ROMANTIC INTEREST CENTERS HERE AND THE 
AND INCORPORATED IN NEW PLANS. 



12 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



of the entire state must be concentrated on the 
problems of supplying the Southland with 
water and power, with ample transportation 
and housing facilities. Out of the confusion 
due to rapid growth, there now arises a plan, 
backed largely by older and native Califor- 
nians, to take hold of Los Angeles' problems 
and to organize the whole metropolitan dis- 
trict according to modern methods with the 
assistance of local and eastern experts, trained 
and experienced in their professions in less 
confusing times. The whole of Los Angeles 
County is now being planned for future 
growth as one municipality from the desert 
and mountains to the crescent coast; and this 
is being done by the men best trained in trans- 
portation, subdivision, parks, boulevards, 
zoning, flood control, and municipal law. 

The erection of the Biltmore Hotel in Los 
Angeles, involving all the latest of improve- 
ments and conveniences which go to make up 
the modern hostelry, is a case in point. Lead- 
ing bankers and business men of Los Angeles, 
deciding that the city — no longer a mere taur- 
ist town — needed a large, downtown hotel, 
financed the proposition and selected as lessee, 
Mr. Mc. E. Bowman of the New York and 
other Biltmore Hotels. Mr. Bowman has ap- 
pointed Mr. James Woods as managing di- 
rector and Mr. Charles Baad as manager. 

The architects for the new hotel are Schultze 
and Weaver of New York, who have designed 
all of Mr. Bowman's hotels as well as many 
others. The general contractors are the Sco- 
field Engineering & Construction Company of 
Los Angeles. 

Ninety-four per cent of the material and 
labor entering into this structure are supplied 
locally. As the building approaches comple- 
tion, the wonder of work as set forth in Pen- 
nell's canal series of etchings is manifested in 
the building of this big hotel to house and 
entertain thousands of the city's inhabitants 
and guests. The great corridor, reaching from 
north to south across the building on the main 
floor, will inevitably assume a place in the civic 
and social life of the city similar to that held 




The ceiling of the ballroom foyer, Biltmore Hotel, now under construction. Schultze 

and If eaver. Architects 

The Wonder of (f ork is exemplified in the construction of this great frame work, 
where the floors are laid and the plasterers at Work on the ceilings before the roof is 
poured. Scofield Engineering and Construction Company. General Contractors. L. A . 




by hotel corridors in eastern cities 
and will serve to crystalize the city's 
present amorphous life. Looking at 
the gigantic framework, rapidly re- 
ceiving its enclosing walls of pressed 
brick, terra cotta, and limestone, one 
who sits on a bench in Pershing 
Square on a warm sunny day in Jan- 
uary receives the unmistakable im- 
pression that Los Angeles has ar- 
rived. The building, pictured on our 
cover in Bonestell's fine drawing of 
the main entrance on Olive Street, 
fills nearly the entire block between 
Fifth and Sixth streets. Not only 
does it face Pershing Square, but 
dominates it from the west. No other 
building on this rapidly crystalizing 
pleasure park has so majestic a height 
combined with so handsome a facade. 
One wishes for a street cafe such as 
Paris offers, where luncheon may be 
eaten al fresco with the buiding in full 
view across the Square. For in this 
Biltmore Hotel the architects have 
given Los Angeles a very fine piece 
of architecture, far and away more 
entertaining as "frozen music" than 
is the jazz that greets our ears. 

Inside, one after another, the work 
of the various crafts is carried out in 
accordance with the schedule of the 
general contractor. To watch the 
work is to see Los Angeles in the 
building; to realize its future assured. 



The Main Lobby 

Biltmore Hotel 

Los Angeles. California 

Schultze and ft' eaver 

Architects 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



13 



PLEASURES AND PURSUITS IN THE SAN GABRIEL VALLEY 



LOOPING the loop in search of a home- 
site is the real name of this article on 
the San Gabriel Valley; but the editor ob- 
jected to the use of such a frivolous title in 
front of the center spread of Southland 
Opinion, so we will take a loop around those 
august editorial pages and tell about the 
luxury of living among orchards and vege- 
table gardens, chicken farms and berry 
acres in the department devoted to Cali- 
fornia Homes and Gardens on a back page. 
Meanwhile the Tournament of Roses, the 
San Gabriel Valley's chief pageant, is still 
a nine days wonder to those homeseekers 
who have come to California this year and 
have seen the pageant in all its beauty for 
their first time. For over thirty years the 
people of Pasadena have followed the exam- 
ple set by its founders, Charles Frederick 
Holder and Dr. Rowland, leaders in the 
sporty Valley Hunt Club, and have cele- 
brated the California climate in a sponta- 
neous gathering of roses and chrysanthe- 
mums, tournament sweet peas and Santa 
Monica carnations, to decorate in the most 
artistic manner conceivable by experts and 
experienced "float builders" the hundreds of 
chariots and pony carriages, public and pri- 
vate automobiles and trucks used during 
all these years in the procession which has 
never failed to appear on New Year's day. 
Into this beautiful festival is condensed the 
gratitude felt by the gringo who has come 
during the last three decades from the bliz- 
zard-swept country beyond the Rockies to 
the sunny winters of the California Coast. 
Originated in this purely impulsive spirit 
by men of such fine literary and artistic 
feeling as the writer of The Channel Islands 
and other scientific and sport books, the 
Tournament has never degenerated into a 
purely commercial show, but can read its 
title clear to a name on America's honor 
roll of folk festivals, expressive of a real 



By ELIZABETH WHITING 




a High 
School 
entrv. 



sentiment lying deep in the heart of every 
adopted Californian. Native Californians 
take the climate for granted, having been 
born to two seasons, green winters and 
golden summers, and sports clothes the year 
round. But the climate is still a wonder 
to newcomers. 

The Tournament of Roses, then is Pasa- 
dena's contribution to an appropriate ex- 
pression of sunny winter days crowned with 
flowers. When other towns have followed 
suit and arranged a real festival there will 
be no need for the hot air publicity now 
become obnoxious to lovers of the state. 

All Southern California comes to Pasa- 
dena on New Year's day and that day has 
become traditionally set aside for the Tour- 
nament of Roses and the Western football 
game. Flowers are planted which will bloom 
at holiday time and roses come from far and 
near to adorn the procession. 

The background for this fete is the Sierra 
Madre range of mountains and the tree- 
lined avenues of Pasadena. The new stad- 
ium, financed by the Tournament Associa- 
tion, will care for the more athletic side of 
the activities and perfection of detail will 
come with the years, as the modern arts of 
drama, music and painting develop in the 
community and are made manifest in the 
fete. 

This year the Art Students' League was 
represented by a prize-taking entry and 
while the towns and city organizations 
which have had long experience present 
exquisite flower-covered examples of pag- 
eantry, yet the introduction of marching 
boys and dancing girls, the costuming of 
historic tableaux and the singing of the 
populace must in tme be introduced to give 
variety. 

Pasadena and Altadena, its mesa district, 
are the great villa tracts above the lower 
(Continued on Page 22) 






THF TIROP CTTRTATN OF THF DFSFRT WHICH LIES BEHIND IT THE SIERRA MADRE RANGE IS THE BACKGROUND FOR THE TOURNAMENT OF ROSES 
WHIPH ?AKF ll ACF ?FVFRY NEW YEAR'S DAY IN PASADENA THIS YEAR THE NEW STADIUM SEEN IN UNCOMPLETED STATE ON THANKSGIVING 
WHICH TAKES PLACE EVERY NEW YEARS DA ^» ™ AU ^^ YEAR'S DAY ENTERTAINMENT. THE GAME WAS BETWEEN PENN STATE AND THE 

WAS WON BY THE LATTER IN AN INTERESTING GAME WHICH BROUGHT THOUSANDS TO THE 
ARROYO OPEN THEATER. 



DAY WAS USED FOR THE FIRST TIME AS A 
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND 



14 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




Art in the Metropolis 

NEW YORK seems to have waked up on the subject of 
Art. Joseph Pennell in his opening address at the 
Anderson Galleries startled the city by his arraignment of 
business men for being "so shortsighted that they could not 
see the financial value of making it possible for artists to 
exhibit their work with little or no expense to themselves 
and through exhibitions bringing in people who would 
spend money." 

Los Angeles may well heed this hint from the older me- 
tropolis. Thousands of our dollars are spent getting up 
mediocre shows which appeal to mediocre pocket books ; 
and while our show committees bring thousands of people 
to our streets they do not bring the people who spend 
money — rather do they drive such people, even our own 
residents, to New York and Europe for real art. Here are 
the artists of Los Angeles pleading for a place in which to 
exhibit their beautiful work down town; here are lovely 
paintings and exquisite sculptures begging the business 
men of Los Angeles to use them for attraction in a proper 
and accessible show room properly situated for customers. 
Los Angeles has no bigger feature than the art of its crafts- 
men, painters and modellers in clay, and it has only to give 
the artists a place in which to show these things and the 
world will come to our art center. 

Mr. Pennell in his address last month in New York proved 
that the recognition of art pays. "And while that is the 
lowest reason" for recognizing it, it is the one that makes 
a great city invest in a building to show the world its art. 

"Paris is not an industrial city, and it has lived on its fine 
arts for 150 years. It has put up one of the finest galleries 
in the world, where exhibitions are continually going on, 
and it pays so well that, for their exhibitions, the artists 
pay the Government only a franc a year. France knows 
what it is doing. Art brings the wealthiest people in the 
world to France, and they not only pay to enter the galleries 
and buy pictures, but spend hundreds of thousands of francs 
in the country. 

London gave to the Royal Academy land in the center 
of Picadilly fifty years ago, on which the Museum erected 
a building. Venice, a city which has gone to pieces, can 
afford an art exhibition gallery. They tried to build Venice 
up as a railroad center and as a naval port, but nothing 
came of it, and finally a fool artist said, "why not try art 
with which we were so successful in the middle ages," and 
now they have an international exhibition every other year. 

We should have an international exhibition of art here 
every Summer. There are more people here then than at 
any other time. It should be a matter for the country, the 
State and the city to consider. It is a short-sighted policy 
that will not consider it. Chicago is the only city that 
recognizes this need, and people pass by New York to go 
to Chicago. The Chicago Art Institute is in the heart of 
the city, and it is visited by many more people in proportion 
to the population than visit the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art in New York. The Brooklyn Museum shows the work 
of modern artists, but you don't find anything of that kind 
at the Metropolitan." 



The Art Students League 

ACTIVITIES at the Pasadena School of Art have taken 
recently, excellent form in an Art Students' League 
run by the artists themselves for their own benefit and 
advancement in art. This is the only way by which an art 
center can be formed in any community. Apprecation of art 
is acquired by hard study or by intelligent travel and the 
buying of mediocre art does not show intelligence nor does 
it aid civic development. 

At the Stickney Studios classes are being formed as they 
are demanded. Students from New York's League have 
asked Tolles Chamberlain to criticie. Mr. Alson Clarke has 
general direction of the painting classes and has given gen- 
erouslv of his time to the project. Miss Mary Allen, secre- 



tary of the league and to whom all communications should 
be addressed, is at the Stickney Memorial Art Building 
regularly to enter students and see that the model is paid. 
Miss Allen, well known for her excellent miniature painting 
in New York and California, has also a class on Saturdays. 
All visiting artists ai*e invited to use the Stickney Studios 
both outdoor and interior, which are well lighted for both 
day and night work. 

American and foreign artists who wish to work in Cali- 
fornia are being invited to Pasadena by the League and 
an effort si now on foot to see tha tthey are supplied with 
properly situated studios. 

Richard Miller, lately quoted in a private letter from 
Paris, still turns with appreciative eyes toward Pasadena 
and says it will be an ideal place for American painters to 
congregate when the city awakens to the necessity of more 
painter's homes and studios on the edge of our beautiful 
arroyo. Mr. Alson Clarke, Mr. De Wolf and Mr. Butler 
already have their own studios there, but transient painters 
must be given good quarters if they are expected to return 
or remain. This is the best beginning for an art center — 
the only one that will succeed in California. 



Monthly Summary of Pacific Southwest Conditions 

EXCERPTS from the report of the Pacific-Southwest 
Banks give a general idea of the products now raised 
in the San Gabriel Valley featured in this issue of California 
Southland : 

"Agriculturally the year just closed has been generally 
satisfactory, in spite of rather severe handicaps due to car 
shortage and decreasing prices for some products. With 
most crops out of the hands of the producers the total 
monetary return during the past year has been better than 
in any year in the history of the Pacific-Southwest; de- 
creases in the price of raisins, for example, having been 
offset by increases in the price of beans, field crops, cotton, 
etc. 

Although there are still some shipments of valencias 
being made from Southern California, the 1922 Valencia 
crop is practically off the market and the navel crop is 
moving in increasing quantities. Shipments are exceeding 
earlier expectations, there having been 1120 carloads of 
oranges shipped from south of the Techachapi and 3368 
carloads from the central San Joaquin Valley, between 
November first and December twentieth, as compared with 
984 and 3670 carloads respectively during the same period 
a year ago. About 60 per event of the total Tulare County 
navel shipments reached jobbers in time for the Christmas 
market, with f. o. b. prices averaging 50 cents per box less 
than last year. 

Increasing competition with foreign lemons is evident, 
as indicated by the fact that arrivals of foreign shipments 
at the port of New York, between November first and the 
middle of December, totaled approximately 300 carloads as 
compared with 55 carloads during the same period in 1921. 
Continuing unsatisfactory prices, because of foreign com- 
petition, is causing some growers to replace their lemon 
acreage with oranges. 

The grape situation has remained practically stationary 
during the month, with indications pointing to the loss of 
from 20 to 30 per cent of the total green grape crop because 
of inability to move the fruit. A movement has been started 
to secure a permit from the Internal Revenue Department 
to salvage this crop through the different wineries. It is 
reported that approximately 600 cars of fruit have been 
converted into grape juice in this manner and sold at prices 
ranging from $10 to $12 for ten gallon kegs. 

The California walnut season is practically closed, with 
the crop out of the hands of producers at satisfactory prices. 
Foreign nuts are being imported in large quantities with 
many Manchurian nuts entering the port of San Francisco. 

The superior quality of the California product is such, 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



15 




however, to prevent serious competition from these foreign 
nuts. 

The new contract being offered by the sugar refineries 
is stimulating interest in sugar beet production and present 
indications point toward an unusually large acreage in 1923. 
Considerable bean acreage has been purchased by sugar beet 
men and it is expected that this land will be planted to sugar 
beets during the coming years. 

After several years of depression the bean market appears 
to be returning to a basis satisfactory to producers. Prices 
for the 1922 crop have been strong, reports indicating that 
to a certain extent prices have been maintained." 

E. H. Tucker 

Director of Research, The First National Bank of Los Angeles and the Pacific- 
Southwest Trust & Savinirs Bank. 

Told on the Trolley 

CONVERSATION heard on the trolley car is often bore- 
some, but to one who sits in his office for many hours 
a clay the ride to Monrovia is just long enough for a pleasant 
chat with a congenial listener. Sometimes, therefore the 
commuter unloads a dissertation worth listening to, and 
seldom seen in print. 

Today the talk was of the rain and of our measures 
taken for flood control. "How seldom we prepare for the 
peak," remarked the engineer. Yet all agreed that the rail- 
roads, knowing the land as few others, have been foremost 
in preparation and are following up their lessons as well 
as can be expected. Will those elected to use the "dear 
public's" money do as well? "Perfectly good men," said 
a heavy voice behind me, "they remind me of what someone 
said of Taft when he was president: 'Perfectly good presi- 
dent surrounded by a group of men who know exactly what 
they want." 

The laugh passed and serious talk of the necessity of 
taking adequate care of the flood waters, which come down 
so suddenly from our wall of mountains, drifted to the work 
now being done in bridge building. Our problems are seri- 
ous ones, but the best brains of the South are now concen- 
trating upon them and we shall be prepared "for the peak" 
if it will only wait for another year or two. 

The Use of Public Funds 

IN a democracy where all citizens are free to express opin- 
ion whether they be experts in a subject or not, it is 
well that we become acquainted with the methods under 
which those elected to carry on the work of public officials 
must operate. The building of public schools, for instance, 
is so vital a matter that neglect of proper methods may 
result in criminal disregard of life and health of children. 

There are four ways by which the architect's plans for a 
building mav be carried out and the edifice erected: the day 
labor method, the percentage method, the segregated con- 
tract method, the general contract method. The first 
method eliminates expert supervision, the second is safe 
only when all men are honest, the third and fourth differ 
in the main in that one places the professional responsi- 
bility for sub-letting certain contracts on the architect as 
representative of the client, the other places that responsi- 
bility on the general contractor as an additional middle-man 
between the architect and the experts who bid on the lines 
of work which the general contractor is not able to carry 
out himself with his own men. 

A discussion on this subject brought on by a pamphlet 
issued by the Associated General Contractors of America, 
was productive of a long contribution read before the South- 
ern California Chapter, A. I. A. at its October meeting by 
J E Allison of the firm of Allison and Allison, well known 
for the beautiful public and semi-public buildings they have 
placed in California. The part of this paper applicable to 
public buildings follows: 

The principal reason that we advocate the segre- 
gated method for public buildings is that the laws of 
the State require that all contracts for public work be 



let in pursuance of a legal advertisement to the lowest 
"responsible" bidder, which means that we must give 
out our plans and specifications to any contractor who 
may apply for them regardless of his reputation or 
responsibility. Then the lawyers define the word "re- 
sponsible" in this connection to mean anyone who can 
furnish a surety bond. Now if the low bidder does not 
have the financial backing to enable him to secure a 
surety bond, it is a simple matter for him to apply to 
some planing mill or lumber company who will cheer- 
fully indemnify him in exchange for his business, thus 
enabling him to come through with a surety bond in 
compliance with the law, and here is where the archi- 
tect's trouble begins. 

If such a general contractor has bid too low and 
should fail financially before the contract is completed, 
as has often happened, the bonding company usually 
refuses to finish the job, advising the architect to finish 
it as best he can, and then the various sub-contractors 
are required to employ attorneys and enter suit against 
the bonding company for their claims. 

The last such contractor who failed on one of our 
school buildings as a result of the conditions above 
mentioned had not paid his sub-contractors and the 
School Board was obliged to employ others to finish the 
work and the sub-contractors who failed to enter suit 
against the bonding company within the limit of time 
specified by the law, lost every dollar they had in the 
work. 

This has never happened to our knowledge under the 
segrated method, as everyone employed has a contract 
direct with the owners and receives his money 
promptly according to contract, and the chances for 
such a one making a mistake in his estimate is con- 
siderably less than with the general contractor, because 
he usually not only knows how to figure his part of the 
work but to actually execute it without loss to himself. 

We all admit, of course, that there are many first- 
class and responsible general contractors and if we 
could always be sure of such on our public buildings the 
chances for the difficulties above mentioned would be 
negligible but I am speaking now of what very often 
happens on public work and a few experiences with the 
so-called "fly-by-night" contractor is, to say the least, 
very discouraging and is a strong temptation to the 
architect to seek some other method that will tend to 
reduce to a minimum the possibility of their re-occur- 
rence. 

A War Worker's Dream 

ONE day, making an appeal for some foreign relief fund, 
I was met too often with refusal in this form: "We 
should do things for our own people. We have no business 
to help the foreigners." Usually this was from those not 
conspicuous in any work for the home necessities. That 
night I dreamed of going to a meeting of the Belgian Relief 
Committee. The ladies all wore a white band around the 
head, and, seating themselves about a long table, made a 
sort of cabalistic sign by putting a hand behind the left ear 
in a listening attitude. I said to them, "I can understand 
the white badge across the forehead. It is clearly a symbol 
of the pure nobility of your purpose. But why did you put 
the hand behind the left ear?" The Chairman, Mrs. Rod- 
man, answered, "God gives us two ears. While He gives 
us the right one to listen to the appeals of the needy in our 
own country, He also gives the left one to hear the cries of 
distress from other lands." 

I awoke, repeating from Matthew XXIII— 23, "These 
ought ye to have done and not to leave the other undone," 
and thought of the refusals of the day before. 

Mrs. William H. Anderson. 



16 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



TOWN AND COUNTRY CLUB FUNCTIONS 

THE HOTELS AS HOST AT HOLIDAY TIME- By ELLEN LEECH 



Twenty or twenty-five years ago when Hotel Green, of Pasadena, 
was the property of Colonel Green and the winter home of himself and 
family, all the Christmas entertainments and parties were planned as 
for a home and the guests were included in the same manner. In those 
days the Green opened early in November, a number of guests always 
planned to come for Thanksgiving, and by the time the Christmas 
holidays drew near there were several hundred families in the house. 
The "Green Parlor," as the large parlor with the big open fireplace 
was known, was used for the tree and there the guests assisted in 
popping corn, and stringing the lovely white blossoms thus opened by 
the heat, combining them with the red berries brought in from the hills, 
and getting more pleasure from these preparations than would have 
been possible in having a tree provided with the decorations all intact. 
One of Colonel Green's friends was always the Santa Claus and there 
was a charming and inti- 
mate sentiment with each 
gift from the heavily laden 
tree. The tables were loaded 
with bowls of fruit, the 
rosy flush of red apples and 
the glint of golden oranges 
vied with the leaping flames 
in reviving memories of 
other Christmas tides in the 
older breasts while the chil- 
dren played games and 
danced. On Christmas Eve 
the children were allowed 
to hang their stockings 
from the big mantle board 
and they were told the same 
stories of the tinkling bells 
of the reindeer as they 
would have listened to if 
they had stayed amid the 
snows of the East for their 
holidays. 

It is hardly possible to 
sit around a Christmas tree, 
either in the glow of the 
firelight or under softly 
shaded candles and ex- 
change remembrances with 
your neighbor or repeat half 
forgotten tales dear to child- 
hood days and not feel bet- 
ter acquainted with those 
sharing the memories 
whether it be in a home or 
in a hotel. Therefore there 
is both precedent and rea- 
son in the continuation of 
this custom in the large re- 
sort hotels of California, it 
begins the winter season 
aright and forges a tie not 
easily overlooked. 

Los Angeles could hardly 
claim to have a "resort" 
hotel until the Ambassador 
was built but now every 
mode and manner of enter- 
tainment is provided, 
whether the guest be of the 
perennial or night bloom- 
ing variety. This year an 
old fashioned Christmas was 
planned for the house 
guests, and others fortu- 
nate to be invited by Mrs. 
Charles Jeffras. The well 
known Cocoanut Grove was 

used but there was no vestige of the tropics remaining, the beautifully 
decorated tree dominated the room, while the Christmas colors, red 
and green, flickered and wavered, danced and spun, in every con- 
ceivable form. Part of the time the tree was partially obscured by the 
progress of a snow storm, which was produced, and removed, by 
cleverly manipulated lights. The guests awaited the bestowal of the 
gifts with marked impatience, added to by the fact that each was 
accompanied by a verse, especially written for the recipient. 

Games of all kinds found favor, many including the invasion of all 
portions of the hotel, through the lobbies, the dining rooms, into the 
kitchens and out again, back to the beginning point, the foot of the 
wonderful tree. And at the end of the evening was the additional 
delight of finding there were to be prizes given by number, and the 
turning of the wheel of fortune to decide the lucky holder. 

The entertainments in the hotels at Christmas time can always be 
of a more intimate and homelike character because there are not so 
many guests until after the first of the year, when the affairs become 
more pretentious and formal. 

The Hotel Maryland has for a long time provided a Christmas tree 
and each year some novel and beautiful celebration. 

This year, as we were vouchsafed so balmy and delightful a yule 
tide, the tree of the Hotel Maryland was placed in the garden, and 



Klmare Grove 

MRS. CHARLES JEFFRAS. OF THE 



there grew and blossomed, and sparkled in the sun by day and the 
moonbeams by night through all the blessed week. 

The day is always opened with the singing of carols in the corridors 
and through the hotel by the choir from All Saints, and surely there 
is no more wonderful way to be awakened than by the strains of a 
Christmas carol. Even though on most mornings you may loathe the 
thought of facing the new day, can think of nothing to compensate 
for leaving the dreams of the night, somehow the distant floating 
strains inspire courage and bring the hope that there may be some- 
thing to look forward to in the living of the day, although you may 
have exhausted the delights of either giving or receiving. 

The Raymond Hotel has made a practice for many years of opening 
between Christmas and New Years, so while there are a few guests 
in the house, perhaps, at Christmas, the formal opening is never held 

until after the twenty-fifth. 
For this reason a Christ- 
mas tree is not provided but 
the opening dinner is al- 
ways made a particularly 
pleasant one, old friends are 
meeting again after a sum- 
mer spent in different por- 
tions of the world, and plans 
are made for the New Years 
day entertainment. The 
Raymond always enters a 
float in the Tournament of 
Roses and all the guests are 
interested to know what de- 
sign will be followed and to 
cheer their entry on to vic- 
tory. One of the teams 
entered for the football 
game of the New Years clay 
?ntertainment is entertained 
at the Raymond and the 
^^^^^^^^^ other at the Maryland, and 

their arrival marks the be- 
J^^^^^^^HL, ginning of activity around 

the house on the hill top. 
The Raymond grounds al- 
ways reminds one of Christ- 
mas festivities anyway, — 
all the twinkling' lights, 
winking, blinking, and beck- 
oning, with a more than 
^^^^M^j^^^V^^^^^fc "come hither look" about 

Mtf T them, and the gust of light 

Wfw from the eleval »r entrance, 

■W^ W comes out like the bright 

glow from an open fire, any 
child would be forgiven for 
running in there to find a 
place to hang up a greedy 
stocking. 

/The Hotel del C>ronado 
has for a long time been 
• known as a veritable giver 

% of "house parties" at Christ- 

£ mas time, it seems such a 
^ logical place to take guests 
U .^p* when you want to have a 

AjW j9 genuine good time, with a 

Am' homey atmosphere. No 

Hj family thinks of going down 
alone but always includes 
f H several friends in the ar- 

possible to interject your 
own personality into the 
hotel life there, because of 
the construction of the 
hotel and the desire of the management to surround each individual 
party with its mode of entertainment. The hotel offers so many 
unexpected nooks and corners that it is never difficult to convince the 
children that Santa Claus is lurking just around one of the turrets or 
towers and it is much easier to convince the grown-ups of his proximity 
at Coronado than elsewhere. Then one can be always sure of so many 
modes of entertainment, bridge, dancing, riding, yachting, tennis, 
golf and polo, — and as the polo tournament always opens soon after 
the first of the year, there is every reason for going early and staving 
- late. 

The West has a reputation for hospitality to be lived up to but 
whether or not this has anything to do with the manner in which the 
hotels are conducted is a question. Most of the resort hotels of this 
section being under the management of Eastern trained hotel men, but 
whatever the fount of the hospitality, the fact remains that the hotels 
are first and foremost the hosts to the visitors who come to this Coast 
whether they are drawn primarily by the vaunted delights of the cli- 
mate, or the mountains or the sea, or because they may play golf every 
day throughout the year, — and that is not a point to be overlooked by 
any visitor of either* sex because if both members of the family do not 
play one does, and the weather, the golf courses, and their proximity 
to the hotels are of vital interest. 




HOTEL AMBASSADOR, I.OS ANGELES 



MMMMMHMMMHIHHHHMHMHllMHHi 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




IS 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



RECENT BOOKS — REVIEWS 

% E. TAYLOR HOUGHTON 

One Man in His Time, This new novel by Ellen Glasgow is teeming 
by tilt* Glasgow with ideas, one big central one and several 

(Doubleday. Page IS Co.) ■ .- ' . , ,. _ , ., 

interesting minor ones shooting off from it. 

Here and there the theme has been treated 
inadequately, but the ideas remain unobscured. We are impressed 
with the book in spite of ourselves. It is the story of a Governor of 
Virginia, a man of the people, a one-time member of the circus, who 
was big enough, sincere and courageous enough to stand, in his sym- 
pathies, between labor and capital. In his genuine effort to "vitalize 
tradition and discipline progress' there was only one thing which could 
happen to a man of his integrity in his partiuclar position — and this 
happens to him in the novel. 



Bill, the Bachflor. 
by Denis Mac tail 
(Houghton. Mijilin Co.) 
Pritr f2.no 



It is neither the plot nor the characters which 
make this novel such fun, but the way the 
author says things in general, the queer little 
twists he gives his phrases and especially his 
clever detached views of this life of ours. He 
has an amusing aloofness from his book which seems to have given 
him an added enjoyment in the writing of it. Bill the Bachelor is 
really something of a detective story and makes very diverting li^ht 
reading. 



Senescence or 

The Last Halj of Lift 

by G. Stanley Hall 

(D. .Ippletnn W Co.) 



Senescence is no preachment or wild cat 
panacea for old age, but merely a straight- 
forward sane presenting of facts. G. Stanley 
Hall, the well-known psychologist who until 
recently has been president of Clark Univer- 
sity has written this impressive and peculiarly interesting account of 
old age as a sister volume to his famous Adolescence. In it he helps 
us think out all the problems which we know will confront us in 
later life if they have not already done so. He develops his own 
idea of death and old age and emphasizes what he considers the 
all-important responsibilities that the old and the near-old have in 
the community. For all those who are not like ostriches in regard to 
age and death, this book written in a fascinating intimate way by 
a student of human nature offers a rare treat. It helps us take 
stock of ourselves which is an excellent and stimulating thing to 
do at any time of life. Perhaps the best way to give an idea of the 
book is to quote from the author's foreword: "I have tried to present 
the subjects of Old Age and Death from as many viewpoints as 
possible in order to show how the ignorant and the learned, the child, 
the adult and the old, savage and civilized man, pagan and Christian, 
the ancient and the modern world, the representatives of various 
sciences and different individuals have viewed these problems, letting 
each class, so far as possible speak for itself." Senescence is a book 
to which we shall turn with increasing frequency as the years slip by. 



From a Bench in Our Square, 
bv Samuel Hopkins A dims 
(Hcuchton Mijilin Co.) 
Price $2.00 



From a Bench in Our Square is made up of 
good short stories written about odd and in- 
teresting characters who have drifted from 
time to time into a strange little sidetracked 
square "walled in" by New York slums. Each 
story has its own universal appeal. Kindly humor lights up the 
whole book and makes it refreshing. 



The Mercy ol .lllah. 
hv Hilaire Belloc 
(D. Appleton Is Co.) 



In telling the adventures of a dishonest 
greedy millionaire of the Orient, Hilaire Belloc 
intended, evidently to write a satire of the un- 
scrupulousness of business methods the world 
over. He makes ingenious use of Oriental proverbs, stringing together 
many unrelated incidents. The irony, quaint settings and sayings 
which at first we find most entertaining finally pall because of their 
sameness. 

//. G. Welles" Those inclined to puzzle about the relations of 

The Secret Places oi the Heart men an( j women j n these modern times will 
(Th^TaTmiilan Company) be started thinking strenuously by H. G. 

Welles' new novel. We are apt to agree with 
him sometimes, more often to disagree violently. Though his book 
makes us think, it fails to make us feel as any real novel should. 
However, as it has no plot it can scarcely be called a novel in the 
true sense. Welles has tossed forth all his pet theories — with pros 
and cons — apparently conceived while he was doing research work 
for his History of the World, in order that his characters may play 
battledore and shuttlecock with them. He theorizes his way through 
The Secret Places of the Heart. 

I Correction In the November issue of The California 

Southland an excellent new publication of the 
Macmillan Company was reviewed. Through an error the author's 




Beautiful Garden Pieces 
in 

Sculptured Terra Cotta 

H 

Italian Terra Cotta Co. 

W. H. Robison 
1149 MISSION ROAD 
Opposite County Hospital 
Phone Lincoln 1057 Los Angeles 



Clark Vase No. 3 5 



name was misspelled. This book, The Principles of Interior 
Decoration, was written by Bernard C. Jakway, a professor in the 
University of California. 



3L WL. ftobtnsoit Co. 

SEVENTH AND GRAND 

Whatever is new and interesting in travel, biography, fiction — 
literature in general — is procurable in the Book Section. First Floor 




J. H. Woodworth 
and Son 

DESIGNING 



-and- 



BUILDING 

Telephone Fair Oaks 218 

200 E. Colorado St. 
Pasadena, California 




Pictorial 

Photographs 

of 

California Landscapes 

Hand Colored in Oil 
J. 

The KORIN 

KODAK AND ART SHOP 
522 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Opposite Pershing Square 



THE BATCHELDER TILES 




We produce Tile for Fireplaces, Fountains, Pave- 
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made from clay. :: :: :: :: " 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



19 



CALIFORNIA 
HOMES AND 

Biiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

The publication of the sketch to be sub- 
mitted in the Architectural Club's Small House 
Competition is postponed until February. The 
delay is unavoidable, due to the extra work 
entailed in preparing the Exhibition of the 
work of the Southern California Chapter of 
the American Institute of Architects, during 
the month of January in the Art Museum, 
Exposition Park, Los Angeles. 

In the place of the proposed sketch is an 
unusually good example of a brick house, with 
the plan, and a detail of the living room, by 
Arthur Kelly, Architect, Los Angeles, Califor- 




DETAIL OF LIVING ROOM. ARTHUR KELLY, 
ARCHITECT. — From California Homes by California Architects. 



GARDENING 
MANUAL 

■iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

Pruning the Roses 

IT is probably a correct statement to say 
that roses are grown more in the American 
garden than any other flower or shrub. Par- 
ticularly might this, be true of California and 
the Pacific Coast in general, although the dis- 
tance of a very few miles in geographic loca- 
tion may spell the success or failure of a given 
variety in our Southland. Soil, exposure, hu- 
midity, fog and many other elements vary so 




Sun kissed 

Ocean washed 
Mountain girded 
Island guarded 



SANTA BARBARA 

If you like California 
you will love Santa Barbara 

JOHN D. BURNHAM, Realtor 
1012 State Street Phone 69 



You'll Never 
Tire of a Pool 
of Water 
Lilies. It ivill 
hold your in- 
terest from 
April to De- 
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Let us tell you how simple it is to have a water-garden. Our catalogue 
free from Dept. A on request. Better still, visit us and see for yourself. 

ALLEN'S WATER GARDENS 

Childs Ave. and Rowena St. 
1 Block South of Los Feliz Blvd. near Griffith Park, Los Angeles. Cal. 
The Only Aquatic Nursery on the Pacific Coast 
Mail Address, R. F. D. 5, Box 407 





20 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




SWIMMING POOL AND LAWNS OF THE CLARKE THOMPSON PLACE IN SANTA BARBARA, CALIFOR. 
NIA. AN EXAMPLE OF WHAT CAN BE DONE WITH LONG AXIAL DEVELOPMENT ON A VERY NAR- 
ROW LOT. R. T. STEVENS, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT, SANTA BARBARA. 



markedly within exceedingly short distances 
that the best rule for the rose grower to fol- 
low, in choosing his varieties, is that of experi- 
mentation of either himself or his neighbors. 

Because of our generally favorable climate, 
however, rose-culture and garden methods gen- 
erally are quite haphazard, being followed 
along the lines of least resistance. Pruning 
of roses is rarely indulged in for gardens that 
do not boast a professional gardener; while 
correct pruning of roses is an unheard of con- 
dition to the average amateur. Still, it is true 
that proper pruning will do as much or more 
than any other one thing to control size and 
beauty of blooms. 

In the first place, roses should have seasons 
of rest, at which time it is proper to prune. 
The rest periods should be created once or 
twice a year by witholding of water, although 
the winter is the normal season for dormancy, 
particularly during a cold season. Roses that 
are relatively dormant may be pruned now. 

The pruning of hybrid perpetuals is influ- 
enced by the type of bloom desired. For large 
masses of flowers, leave four of five canes 
three feet high, and cut out all of the old, 
weak wood. This will give a large number of 
flowers, effective on the bush but small and 
with weak foot-stalks, unsuitable for cutting. 
After the bloom is entirely over, the long 
stalks should be shortened back to stimulate 
new wood for the next season of bloom. 

For cutting roses of the hybrid perpetuals, 
one should retain all strong, healthy canes 
and cut them back to six or eight inches, al- 
ways just above a bud. This will force larger 
flowers, with stronger stems. The number of 
canes retained will increase each year with the 
age of the bush. Pruned in this way the flow- 
ering stalks should not require stakes. 

Dwarf-growing tea roses do not endure so 
severe pruning as do the hybrid perpetuals. 
All good, strong canes should be retained, un- 




THE RAINY SEASON. ALONG PERSHING SQUARE 
OPPOSITE THE NEW BILTMORE. LOS ANGELES, 



less too close a head is thus formed. Shorten 
the shoots one-third of their length, and prune 
the longest ones sparingly after each season 
of bloom. 

Fertilize the flower garden heavily, this 
month, spading rotted manure deeply into the 
ground. Sow seed, in flats, of acroclinium, 
antirrhinum, calendula, calliopsis, candytuft, 
centaurea, celosia, candytuft, centaurea, cel- 
osia, chrysanthemum, cosmos, gaillardia, lark- 
spur. Sow in the open ground seed ot alys- 
sum, clarkia, collinsia, cosmos, eschscholtzia, 
Hiram, lupinus, mignonette, nemophila, poppies, 
sweet peas. Transplant carnations, petunias, 
pansies, shasta daisies and stocks. Continue 
to plant all Dutch bulbs, iris, Lilium auratum, 
L. speciosum, L. huiriboldtii, calla lilies, gladi- 
olus, amaryllis, lily-of-the-valley, spiraea and 
dielytra. 

Ralph D. Cornell, Landscape Architect. 

THE COMMON EARING 

By CYRIL F. CARPENTER F. E. S. 

FOR many people the common earwig will 
have no "endearing charms," but perhaps 
a slight knowledge of its life-history may en- 
able them to~ regard it with more equanimity 
than formerly. 

It is, of course, an unfounded superstition 
that these insects creep into the ear, and pierce 
through to the brain, causing death. The ear- 
wig, on the contrary, shows a distinct aver- 
sion to "animal matter" in living form, and 
unless starving will not evince cannibalistic 
tendencies toward its own kith and kin, as its 
chief articles of sustenance are composed of 
vegetable matter, with the occasional delicacy 
of a dead fly or moth a la mode. 

This insect is known to all by its round, red- 
dish colored head, long antennae and, more 
especially, by the forceps at the end of its 
abdomen, which are shaped like two crescents 
joined together at the upper extremities and 
open at the lower. These forceps are used to 
assist the insect in folding up its delicate 
wings, but seldom as a means of offense and 
defense, though they can, on occasion, adminis- 
ter a sharp pinch. 

The female earwig lays her eggs under 
stones, in crevices in wood, or under the bark 
of trees. In appearance these eggs are oval, 
of a yellow color and very minute. Unlike 
many insects the mother earwig has the credit 
of possessing strong maternal instincts, and if 
the eggs are displaced will carefully gather 
them together again. Such care, however, is 
impossible to the many female insects who die 
naturally almost immediately after laying 
their eggs. 

The earwig's eggs soon hatch, not into larvae 
or into caterpillars, but into what are known 
as nymphs, though these are without wings or 
elytra. That is to say, they have the form of 
the adult insect at this stage, though they are, 
of course, much smaller in size. As the 
nymphs grow older they pass through several 
moulting stages. Immediately after shedding 
their skin each time they remain soft and 
white, but gradually become darker in hue, 
and harder in texture, the longer they are ex- 
posed. After the fourth or fifth moult the out- 
line of the wings may be observed marked on 
the thorax. When the last moulting stage is 
passed the insects are adults, and have a pair 
of elytra, or hard wing covers, under which 
to protect their more delicate wings. These 
wings are about seven times the size of the 
elytra, so it may be imagined that the insects 
need to exercise considerable ingenuity in fold- 
ing these extremely fragile wings carefully 
back to their resting place. 

The earwig is very voracious and feeds 
chiefly upon vegetable matter, doting upon the 



HEWSON STUDIOS 

MANDWOVEN HOMESPUNS For 
Dresses, Skirts, Scarfs, Blankets and Bags 



b02 E. Colorado Si 



Pasadena 



corollas of such flowers as dahlias and nastur- 
tiums, spoiling the symmetry of the petals. It 
is also partial and destructive to ripe fruit. 

The ichneumon fly is parasitic upon the ear- 
wig's body. In course of time this egg hatches 
into a larva which lives on the vital tissues. 
It is, however, a debatable point to what ex- 
tent the ichneumon fly keeps earwigs in check. 

Earwigs dislike light and have a penchant 
for dark, gloomy and damp places. Gardeners 
may easily make suitable dark traps and 
fasten them during the evening about the at- 
tacked plants, and in the morning take round 
a bucketful of boiling water with which to 
kill the captives. The earwigs drop to the 
ground at the lightest touch, so that it is ad- 
visable when dislodging them to have the 
bucket directly beneath the trap. 




The University Club 



NORMAN D. BISHOP 



220 West Fifth St. 

LOS ANGELES 



Bdwy. 34J0 



Lighting Fixtures. Andirons, Lamps 
Designed and Executed in 
Wrought Iron. Bronze and Brass 
Plant on North Hill St. 



Do you 
want to 
subscribe ? 
Take the 
scissors and 
cut out this 
coupon. Fdl 
it out with 
care and 
send it to 
Subscription 
Department, 
California 
Southland, 
Pasadena 
California. 



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'c 



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-o 
< 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



21 



THE SECOND OF A SERIES OF LESSONS ON PROCESSES IN HANDICRAFT 
HAMMERED OR WROUGHT IRON— ^ Georgia nieman, Designer 



ANYONE at all familiar with the crafts 
will be able to go about hammered or 
wrought iron with more or less intuition, those 
inexperienced will require study, perseverance. 
The methods used are very simple, unless one 
goes into the more intricate and elaborate 
work where brazing and welding are neces- 
sary — although in a small way these may be 
accomplished over a kitchen range or gas 
flame. 

Many small ornamental and useful objects 
may be made in one's own home, such as — 
candle sticks, trays of various sorts and sizes, 
and fire sets; in the latter a heavier metal 
will be required than that which is mentioned 
below. 

In the present day home, the use of wrought 
iron is most attractive and very much sought 
after; the early Spanish being of a more 
simple and almost crude workmanship, but, 
even in the crudeness, the artistic ability ob- 
viously presents itself. 

Spanish metal work has many branches; 
and is, historically, too prolific for one small 
article. But its excellence makes it worthy of 
serious study. 

For the construction of an early Spanish 
candelabra 14 inches in height, with an arm 
spread of 10 inches (that is from center of 
one candle cup to center of other) one 
requires : 

1. Nine inch piece of quarter-inch iron for 
main body. 

2. 28-inch length of 1/16 inch by %-inch 
cut in four equal lengths for base, 7 inches 
each, and a 16-inch length of same for cross 
arm. 

3. Light weight iron, brass or copper, 7 




a very effective rusty appearance. Chemicals 
are used mostly in finishing, but rather a 
long process. 

If copper or brass is used, the surface should 
be thoroughly cleaned (vinegar and salt solu- 
tion is very good), heated, then lacquered with 
camel hair brush, heated again to attain 
smooth even surface. 

Sometimes one prefers the natural colors 
in copper, by just dipping in sulphuric acid, 
rinsing, lacquering, and time and age or a 
little heat will do the rest. 

Supplies 

Tin snips, cutting pliers, round nosed pliers, 
flat nosed pliers, steel punches — various sizes, 
reamer, riveting hammer, bench hammer — 
about % -pounds, bench anvil and anvil stake, 
rivets, bolts, sandpaper, soldering iron, solder- 
ing fluid, solder, lacquer, flat black paint, oil 
paints in Venetian Red, Cobalt or French Blue, 
Gamboye or Yellow Ochre, Terre Verte 
(Green) and Gold. Turpentine or Cial Oil 
for thinning colors, solid bench or table, wood 
blocks for moulds can be cut into shape, or 
lumps or hard pitch. 

The colors are used sometimes on leaves or 
iron to give them the desired effect of Poly- 
chrome. 



FRENCH and ITALIAN ARTS and CRAFTS 

Imported by 
MISS HOLLINGS WORTH BEACH 

Evening Bags. Old Silver, etc. Antiques 
Embroidered Linens Potteries 
630 E. Colorado Street Pasadena. Calif. 



F.gr 



A ft 




T< ci nr. 






E> c 



W\A7 





TV g , 




a a 

















Ti $r BE. 




inches by 8 inches from which are made two 
circles 4 inches in diameter for plates, and two 
rectangles 3 inches by 4 inches for candle 
cups; file and sandpaper edges. 

Fig. I. The main body may be twisted in 
center for break by heating to almost red heat 
— put in vice and with wrench twist around 
twice, see that the rod keeps perfectly straight, 
and that both ends are square before cooling 
metal. 

Fig. II. Now each of the four 7-inch 
lengths are bent over an anvil and hammered 
into a curve, somewhat straight at one end 
and more rounding at the other to allow for 
the spread and proper support. 

Fig. III. The arm length is shaped by the 
same method, but with both curves being 
equal. Three holes are stamped through for 
construction, one in center and one at IV2 
inchecs from each end, using %-inch stamp. 

Fig. IV. Cutting the 4-inch circles with 
rather an uneven edge lends character — these 
hammered and rounded slightly upward to 
form a sort of dish — stamp hole in center with 
%-inch stamp. 

Fig. V. Hammer the 3V2-inch edge of rec- 
tangle for candle cup, making an uneven, 
slightly flaring top (A), cut sections from 



lower edge % inch in depth, (B), hammer 
into cylinder and rivet or solder (C), then 
bend lower points together to complete cup 
(D). If leaves are used, they are shaped over 
anvil or block into form — light sheet iron 
may be formed in the same way, avoiding 
soldering or riveting, only necessitating a 
inch hole in bottom. 

Fig. VI. The clamp to secure base to main 
body- — light wire may be used for this — also 
decorative scrolls. 

Fig. VII. Scrolls welded together. 

The four sections of the base are fitted to 
the main body, soldered, then clamped. The 
cups and saucers are riveted to the arms leav- 
ing the rivet heads on lower sides of arm, then 
place arm on top of main body in which a %- 
inch hole has been drilled — a little solder used 
at this joining is quite necessary — a larger 
bolt or knob may be used here as a termination. 

A simple and quick finish, if a dull black is 
desired, is Flat Black, which is applied with a 
soft brush, a glass may be attained by wip- 
ing surface (after paint is dry) with boiled 
oil. Some people prefer an antique finish 
which is gained by using white or light gray 
paint — burying the article for some weeks in 
which the paint chips off in places and gives 



An Ideal School for Young Women 

Cumnock §?>cf)ool 

COLLEGE WORK IN THE FOLLOWING 
COURSES: 
Vocal Interpretation of Literature 
Literary Appreciation Story Telling 
Public Speaking Journalism 
Dramatics Short-Story 
Voice and Diction Dancing 
French Psychology 

Art and Art Appreciation 
An accredited High School and Junior School 
under same management 
HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
200 S. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles 

54720— Wilshire 79 



Mtiss Jpriscilla Gabsbun 

TEACHER OF DANCING 
Hotel Maryland — Hotel Vista Del Arroyo 

Tel. F. O. 4060 Pasadena, California 



The 

Gearharts 

ETCHINGS AND 
BLOCK PRINTS 

By Local and Foreign Printmakers 

611 South Fair Oaks Ave. 
Near California St. 
PASADENA 
Phone Colorado 4449 




22 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



San Gabriel Valley. This residence dis- 
trict of paved streets, tree-lined and parked, 
extends from the heights of Altadena Golf 
Club down to San Gabriel Mission, to other 
towns along the foothills and to the city 
of Los Angeles itself on the west and south. 

Looping the loops on trolley or boulevard- 
ing in a touring car, one goes out from the 
metropolis on many potent trips to find just 
the right spot for the home of one's dreams. 
Chambers of Commerce, those centers of 
citizenship and enterprise, are bureaus of 
information to guide the homeseeker not 
only to a house, but to a farm, not only to 
the particular kind of house one wants, but 
to the particular business or line of horti- 
culture one has chosen to play with for his 
sojourn in California. Everything is here 
to play with from a whole town which needs 
remodeling in conformity with our tradi- 
tions of California architecture to the 
tiniest chicken ranch or violet farm. 

At La Verne the situation of the town 
itself invites the lover of a perfect view 
and outlook on life as well. Remarkable 
are its school advantages. 

At San Gabriel great doings thrill the 
heart of the lover of this Spanish-conquered 
land. The building of the new Mission 
Play house in the style and material of the 
old Mission of San Antonio, the most beau- 
tiful of them all, is in itself a fine feat. But 
San Gabriel is not satisfied with that. She 
is remodeling the whole business center of 
the modern town to fit in with this ambi- 
tious scheme. Like Santa Barbara, the 
town will build around an old Spanish plaza. 




THE SAN GABRIEL VALLEY LOOKING TOWARD OUR DOMINANT MOUNTAIN MOUNT SAN ANTONIO 
FROM A PAINTING BY BENJAMIN C. BROWN. PASADENA, CALIFORNIA. MR BROWN WAS BORN IN 
THE OLD SOUTH AND TRAINED IN ST. LOUIS AN ) PARIS AND HAS PAINTED THE NFW SOUTH OF 
CALIFORNIA WITH SYMPATHY AND FINESSE U 




THE NEW CITY 
CONTRIBUTION 
OF A NEW PLAY 



HALL FOR SAN GABRIEL NOW BEING ERECTED AS THE FIRST UNIT OF A BEAUTIFUL CIVIC 
TO THE RESTORATION OF THE MISSION BUILDINGS AROUND THE CHURCH AND THE BUILDING 
HOUSE COPIED AFTER THE MOST BEAUTIFUL OF ALL CALIFORNIA MISSIONS, SAN ANTONIO DE 
PADUA NEAR PASO ROBLES, CALIFORNIA. 



At El Monte, end of the Santa 
Fe Trail and the heart of the 
valley, diversified farming is 
developing rapidly and the ideal 
life is worked out in a live town. 

Baldwin Park offers oppor- 
tunities as a growing center of 
combination farming. 

In the eastern end of the San 
Gabriel Valley the Puente hills 
give variety and give Puente its 
own valley, full of fruit, garden 
products and avocados. 

Pomona, larger than the other 
valley towns, has developed un- 
usual and distinctive character- 
istics as a model home town sur- 
rounded by orchards and is well 
worth careful investigation by 
town-house seekers this year. 

Looping back along the foot- 
hill boulevard we stop for lunch 
at the inn in Claremont, that 
lovely college town. 

Motoring on we climb the foot- 
hill boulevard to glide through 
villages that beckon us. We 
must stop at Glendora, loveliest 
example of a foothill town, with 
little streets running off into 
the hills and an enterprising 
business center, leaving nothing 
to be desired by the seeker after 
California home life. 




All along 

the 
b.ulevards 
are-little 
towns. 

J itretl in 
Glendora. 
MBit charming 
oi all on the 

foothill 
boulevard. 



El Monte is 
the center of the 
garden oj 
Los Angeles. 



A book of photographs, sketches, and plans of represent- 
ative California homes designed by your leading archi- 
tects. Price $1.00. Title— "California Homes." 

Address: Ellen Leech 
544 So. El Molino Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 




COMBINATION FARMING. WALNUTS AND CHICKENS REPRESENTATIVE OF 
THE CENTER OF THE GARDEN OF SAN GABRIEL VALLEY, BALDWIN PARK. 



CALIFORNIA 




LADY WASHINGTON BEANS IN A SUNKIST ORANGE GROVE REPRESENTA- 
TIVE OF THE FERTILE SAN GABRIEL VALLEY AND THE PUENTE VALLEY, 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY. CALIFORNIA. 



'Dominating the San Qabriel Galley at Its Western Edge is 
the Raymond Hotel, Foremost oAmong the Tourist Hostelries 



The. 




This Beautiful Home 

in Altadena, 1550 feet above sea level, above the 
winter fogs, where killing frosts are very rare, 
where the stars are undimmed by city lights, 
where the view on clear days extends from 100 
miles East to 105 miles West, and many miles of 
the shore-line of the Pacific are clearly visible, 
where country life has all city conveniences with- 
out the crowds and noises, is for sale at a reason- 
able figure by the owner. 

PAUL F. JOHNSON 

560 East Colorado Street Pasadena, California 



OUTHLAND 23 

UN CASTILLO DE ESPANA 

By FRANCES MATILDA PURDY 

ALMOST everyone is familiar with the sight of the Mission Inn, at 
Riverside, California, from the vewpoint of a well known and 
Justly celebrated hostelry. So familiar, in fact, have we become with 
it, that a rather commonplace attitude has blinded many of us to the 
possibilities of a visit to this charming place from the angle presented 
towards any other natural attraction of Southern California. 

For it is "natural" attraction, at the present time, whatever may 
have been the appearance of this building in the begnning, and the 
cunning methods in construction and landscape gardening to obtain 
an effect of great age, have been so well supplemented during the 
many years that have passed since then by nature, that it has in truth 
become, under the genuinely accumulated marks of time and almost 
tropical luxuriance of shrubbery and tree growth in which it is nearly 
hidden, an old Spanish castle of the Mission type. 

This impression is not only experienced at first sight of its uneven 




IN THE GARDEN OF THE MISSION INN. RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA. 



red brick paved patios, whose weather stained beams above seem to 
sag heavily with age, but the very atmosphere, once inside its arched 
gates conduces to dreamy reflection, in which the abhorrent thought 
of modern rush, and bustle, produces that lazy "manana' feeling, 
suggestive of aeons of time ahead. A brooding, restful quiet pervades 
its arched portals and lazily swinging seats, while the occasionally 
gutteral murmur of brilliantly hued macaws, and musical splash of 
falling water transports one to a world remote from clanging cars and 
honking motors just outside this cloistered retreat. 

Everywhere the eye is charmed by apparently convincing evidence 
that this "Castle" has long been the luxurious home of some hospitable 
Spanish family; and this effect is never spoiled by the harsh intrusion 
of everyday facts, such as noisy bell boys, and intrusive attendants, 
a courteous management permitting to the casual visitor who sends 
in his card the same unhampered freedom in every corner of build- 
ing or grounds as to any registered guest. Once the guest of the 




A PERGOLA EXTENDS ACROSS THE ENTIRE SOUTH FACADE OF THE 
MISSION INN AT RIVERSIDE. ARTHUR BENTON, ARCHITECT. 



24 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




BROADWAY COR. SIXTH 
LOS ANGELES 



OFFERS a distinguished 
collection of gowns for 
Milady which express the air 
of dainty refinement as well 
as correct style. 



Master of the Inn, one may follow the dictates of his fancy, wandering 
at will from catacomb to turret, in perfect happiness, disturbed by no 
apprehension as to being out of place in such an environment. 

The catacombs alone are worth a trip to the "Castle," endlessly 
twisting and turning ahead, narrow and low-ceiled, one leading into 
another, apparently far down into the very depths of underground 
beneath the building; but in reality only a few feet below the level of 
the floor above, winding around the Chapel, and dark recesses, mys- 
terious and enchanting to the imagination. 

Admiration for the genius who conceived and executed the whole 
scheme of these underground passages continually fills the wanderer. 
With truly Spanish ingenuity, they baffle the determination to seek 
their outlet. Here, a step or two up discloses interminable vistas; 
now down, into a "cul de sac," wherein is set a lighted altar, hundreds 
of years old perhaps, ornamented with doll-like images of the saints; 
then back around a corner, where, far ahead at the end of a dimin- 
ishing perspective, in the dusky light is distinguished a man in armor 
and casque, standing posed, immovable, inspiring a hesitatingly doubt- 
ful apprehension of some uneasy wraith wandering in these' ghostly 
underground regions. But, upon drawing near, the knight is seen to 
be part of a group of very real looking wax figures, standing about 
the small alcove behind a railing in lifelike attitudes and correctly 
ornamental dress of that period. An interpretation of the meaning 
shown in their arrested pose, displayed on the well illuminated tablet 
at one side, is given as an historic Catholic ceremony, and indeed close 
study of the waxen features reveals a startling likeness to old for- 
gotten drawings. With thoughtful attention, a long seat has been 
placed opposite that they may be studied in comfort and at leisure. 

These catacombs are indirectly and duskily, but adequately lighted, 
frequent ventilator openings also being utilized most artistically to 
illuminate with carefully regulated, bluish daylight rays, some 
statuette, or picture, with all the startling effect of a spotlight, against 
the unearthly dimness. 

Each step reveals some new object for study, inviting the inspec- 
tion of small cells containing Indian treasures of basket work, and 
Navajo blanket-hung walls, whole corridors being lined with Indian 
pottery. Another has an interesting collection of firearms and 
"espadas," the blades and daggers silver and gold inlaid; scabbards 
of ancient design — multitudes of sharp pointed, deadly looking objects 
impossible to describe; old saddles and harness — a perfect storehouse 
of old Spanish mementoes. 

We pass through an old gate of twisted sticks, held together in 
primitive fashion used by the Indians, with hardened yucca thongs, 
and wander into a narrow, brick-lined corridor, whose rough surface 
is constructed in a series of unusual, and architecturally perfect 
overhead arches, meeting in a dome, and whose sides, at intervals con- 
taining niches, are lined with jewel-like pictures, suggestive of some 
ancient mission's walls. And, following this suggestion, splendidly 
executed sepia photographs of immense size, illustrating every Mission 
in California, as well as events of prominence connected with each, are 
contained within many of these corrdors, illuminated in such an ex- 
pert manner as to mystify the bewildered and delighted enthusiast. 

The strains from the pealing organ, apparently far above, follow, 
echoing down below, and it is with absolute amazement, so perfect has 
been the acoustic effect of dark remoteness in regions underground, 
that one steps directly from catacomb to chapel. 

And a most wonderful Chapel it is, with its high backed, carven 
chairs and benches from Spain; its velvets and tapestries; its stained 
glass, and heavy rugs. No detail has been left to sigh for that will 
help to transplant the modern, haste-loving American to another en- 
chanting world. Its great organ, "played by a master hand," carries 
with it that subtle suggestion of a religious atmosphere, inseparable 
from any Mission, conducive to reverie, in its subdued and restrained 
restfulness. 

Just as in old Spain, too, every room in the house opens upon an 
iron railed balcony overlooking and entirely encircling the patio, so 
also this castle has its arily wrought balconies with drooping green- 
ery; its cages of singing birds; its gaudily colored macaws and 
parrots. 

And no surprise whatever is felt when, upon one of these graceful 
balconies are seen, apparently enjoying their home to the utmost, two 
Spanish caballeros, lounging in the velvet and silk of their country's 
costume, guitarras and mandolins in hand, conversing animatedly 
with the beautiful senorita beside them, a black lace mantilla draped 
over her high combed tresses, in which a red rose is coquettishly set 
with Carmenesque effect; while, not far away, their Indian maid, 
dressed in yellow buckskin, with beaded band across her straight 
brows, fingers her harp for their entertainment. 

Languidly, she seats herself, and the harpist ripples the air with 
delicate melody, to be in turn succeeded by a fandango, fingered 
rapidly upon mandoline and guitarra by the senores, echoes of the 
quickening music falling back from the awninged canopies lazily 
flapping above to veil the hot rays of el sol. 

Inspecting these balconies more closely gives one an even greater 
thrill, their green twined arches forming a satisfying prspective in 
every direction, old marble garden seats and sundials offering a 
loitering place that invites a waste of all too limited time. An ancient, 
iron-railed staircase, has been bodily transplanted from some old 
Spanish building to ornament the wall of this castle, its genuine age 
apparent by the chipped-off carvings from old wooden beams, and 
broken bronze bolts. 

Bronze, indeed, is a metal more prominently in evidence, just here, 
than any other part of this dream castle, as, slightly above, and to 
one side of the patio, is "The Roof Of The Bells"— hundreds of bells, 
ranging from tiny bell-lets to heavy cracked monsters that must have 
sent their tones of joy or sorrow afar, when Padre Serra trudged 
after his slow going beast over the dusty eaminos. A round little 
tower, built on this roof, is hung with bells of all sizes and shapes, 
while set upon every possible space, and around the edge of the roof, 
are large bells of all descriptions. One cannot help feeling what a 
"Tintinnabulation of the bells, bells, bells," there would be, should 
some spirit hand start them all going at once! 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

When California plays the hostess, she decorates her home with fruit, 
as well as flowers and Autumn foliage. 



25 




Out on the Veranda in November persim- 
mons added their rich color to 
the Thanksgiving feast. 



A RANCH HOME IN THE SAN GABRIEL VALLEY IN WHICH THE EFFECTIVE DECORATIONS 
THANKSGIVING DAY WERE MADE UP ENTIRELY OF FOLIAGE AND FRUIT. 



FOR 



"AMY MAY" BATIK BANDANAS 



By MARGARET CRAIG 



Of all the styles that have stirred the imagi- 
nation and that have enriched a costume, there 
have been none so challenging as the Batik 
bandanas. 

These colorful squares of silk are used for 



every costume, but they are particularly effec- 
tive for sports wear. In the mountains they 
are worn about the bead, gypsy fashion, about 
the shoulders, or fastened to the belt. 

For the afternoon or evening wear, the ban- 
dana, if small, is caught through a ring, the 
end of a necklace or if larger, is worn at the 
waist. 

In the "Amy May" Studio, 527 California 
Terrace, Pasadena, California, there are dis- 
played many lovely batik costumes, blouses, 
negligees, draperies, and lamp-shades, but at 
the present moment, concentrated attention is 
being bestowed upon the bandanas that have 
taken the West as well as the East, by storm. 





IN THE PASADENA STUDIO. 



Photographs by Margaret Craig 



THE BATIK BANDANA IS WORN ON THE HEAD 
WITH SPORTS COSTUME. 



OR LOOSELY TIED AROUND THE NECK TO GIVE 
COLOR. 



26 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



THE MONEY MARKET 



LESLIE B. HENRY 
Blythe, Witter & Co. 



WITH the coming- of the new year the investor who is looking- for 
the trend of interest rates for the next twelve months would 
appear to find the best material for his or her deductions in the 
combined banking, industrial, and agricultural situations of the last 
nine months. 

Since March, 1922, at which time borrowing was at its minimum, 
the total loans and investments of member banks in principal cities 
where the effects of industrial activity are felt most have increased 
but $1,250,000,000 or a trifle over eight per cent, according to the 
December Review of the Federal Reserve Agent at New York. This 
very small inroad into credits for the purpose of industrialism is its 
own indication of what may be expected during the coming twelve 
months by way of borrowing for industrial purposes. This becomes 
particularly notable when it is remembered that since October of 
1920 commercial loans in member banks of the Federal Reserve Sys- 
tem have dropped nearly thirty per cent, while in turn the total of 
investment by the member banks including acceptances and United 
States Government securities has moved up less than ten per cent, 
in the same period of time gold in the Reserve Banks has increased 
fifty-two per cent and in almost the same ratio as the known gold 
stock of the country. 

What the situation is in the industrial field is best represented by 
the fact that the outstanding commercial paper of the twenty-seven 
principal dealers in the United States has dropped from $1,350,000,- 
000 as of February, 1920, to $750,000,000 in November, 1922. A 
continuance of the renewed industrial activity that marked the last 
ninety days in the manufacturing centers east of the Mississippi 
River as well as the re-financing operations on a long term basis 
being undertaken by corporations seeking the benefits of tax relief 
through stock dividends and other methods, should make a demand 
on the splendid supply of credit available in our banks that will 
change the situation from what it has been during the last two years. 
Added to this, the efforts of the Inter-State Commerce Commission 
once and for all to present to the investment bankers of the country 
as well as to the shippers a national railroad situation that can 
properly command money for both maintenance and extension that 
have been in most cases too long delayed, will produce an added de- 
mand upon tho country's capital that should be reflected in the in- 
terest rate before the year is through. 

Abundant crops the past year drew prices that permitted of little 
increase in the capital funds of the country as is represented by 
the still weakened condition of banking institutions in the middle 
western districts. However, another crop of similar proportions — 
and it is important to note that out of the last crop sufficient was 
saved by the farmers to assure them of current credit for seeding 
and harvesting through the coming twelve months — in all likelihood 
will bring a better price with resultant buying against renewed in- 
dustrial production. 

Everything would indicate a period of renewed prosperity through- 
out the country since the largest possible store of investment funds 
in the banks is by no means superior to the demand to be made upon 
them by merely a renewal of our normal borrowing in view of the 
fact that in the particular field of railroading upwards of five years 
of extension work and in many cases from two to five years of simple 
maintenance work require financing. 



THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 

PRIVATE ESTATE 

c Requires the most thorough study of the 
many conditions involved. BE SURE 
you secure competent service. 



€\nvtmt f. Jag 

LANDSCAPE ,\ ENGINEER ,\ CONTRACTOR 
PASADENA 



1 820130 \s 
PHONES J ( 8 22803 




f/ An office for your 
business at $ 1 0.00 
per month 


CAMPBELL 


OFFICE SERVICE 



823-824 LOEWS STATE BUILDING 

BROADWAY AT SEVENTH LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 



Financial Pirates! 



By promises of fabulous 
profits they persuade you to 
place money in highly specu- 
lative ventures. In most cases 
you lose, they win. 

You will have more money 
in the end if you select a 
SAFE investment for your 
savings, although the percen- 
tage of profit is smaller. 

Such a place of safe invest- 
ment is a Savings Account in 
a Pasadena Bank. 



PASADENA CLEARING 
HOUSE ASSOCIATION 



Harmonizing Profit 
With Safety 



Large profits and strong security do not travel together. 
It is usually true that to make hig gains one must take 
hig risks; and, conversely, to insure safety of principal 
one must be content with a moderate return on the in- 
vestment. 

However, it is frequently possible for one who keeps in 
close touch with financial matters to increase his income 
materially w ithout in any way jeopardizing his principal. 

To assist investors in harmonizing profit with safety, and 
obtaining the most attractive returns consistent with 
strong security, is one of the important functions of our 
organization. 

Send /<«■ new booklet "Fuels Important to Investor*" 

Drake,*Riley ^Tliomas 

Government, Municipal and Corporation Bonds 
314 Van Niivs ItMg.. Log Angeles — Telephone Pico "87 

Santa Barbara San Francisco Pasadena 

1014 State Street 603 Cal. Commercial Union Bldg. 16 So. Raymond Ave. 
Telephone 494 315 Montgomery St. Fair Oaks 26 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



27 



THE BLUE LANTERN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheon Afternoon Tea 

Dinner 
Distinctive Service 
Dinners and Luncheons Delivered 
and Special Orders Taken 
198 No. Los Robles, Pasadena, Cal., 
Phone Fair Oaks 1832 



REAL CALIFORNIA CANDIED FIGS 
A Delicious Confection 

I lb. Box, Parcel Post Paid .... $ I .50 
4 lb. Box, Parcel Post Paid . . . . $5 .00 
Samples Upon Request 

EL MOLINO CANNING CO. 

2651 Nina St., Pasadena, Cal. Col. 756 



PASADENA LEATHER GOODS CO. 

Suit Cases, Purses, Bags 
Puttees for Men, Women and Children 
Insured and Guaranteed Trunks 

742 E. Colorado St., 
Fair Oaks 354 Pasadena 



PASADENA 

WINDOW SHADE 
SHOP 

Makers of Exclusive 
WINDOW SHADES 
The Best in Materials and 
Workmanship 
12 Holly Street. Fair Oaks 48 




THE PEACOCK 
Delicious Food — Daintily Served 
Luncheon — Afternoon Tea 
Dinner 

Dinner Every Night $1.00 
Chicken Dinner Tuesdays and 
Thursdays $1.50 
SPECIAL DINNERS 
30 Garfield Ave.. Pasadena, Cal. 
Fair Oaks 179 



Pasadena Music House 

Established 1S92 
Pianos, Victrolas, Records 

87 East Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 




HERBERT F. BROWN 

Stationery, Books 
And Picture Framing 



190 E. Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 66 



WUICK 

HOWARD MOTOR CO. 

267 W. Colorado St. 

C. S. Brokaw. Res. Mgr. Col. 397 



MARGARET CRAIG 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Photographs Taken in Your Own 
Home 

610 So. Western Ave., Los Angeles. 
Telephone 56254 



rJ he 

CATERERS AND 



fa/if i 



CONFECTIONERS 

prepare the most delectable cool, crisp salads and the 
daintiest, yet altogether the most satisfying of sandwiches. Of 
course, there are the frozen dainties together with the wonder- 
ful French pastries for which the Elite has long been famous. 
Those who prefer hot dinner dishes such as steaks, chops, 
chicken, roast turkey or duck and other meats or fish are served 
daily a la carte from 11 :30 a. m. to 11 :30 p. m. The Catering 
Department is prepared to serve at your home for all occa- 
sions on short notice any number of people. 

A box of chocolates and Bon Bons 
or other candies of our own make 
can not fail to give satisfaction. 

629 to 641 SO. FLOWER ST., LOS ANGELES 
634 E. COLORADO ST., PASADENA 



Pasadena Corset Shop 

Mrs. H. B. Ford 
CORSETIERE 
Corsets and Accessories 
Lingerie, Negligees, Robes, Silk and Wool Hosiery, 
Sports Hose 
308 East Colorado Street 
Fair Oaks 3388 Pasadena, Calif. 

( )pposite the New First National Bank 



THE RADIO STORE 

SO quickly do we become accustomed to the applications of research 
in science, that what was last year a marvel for the feature page 
now takes its place in the advertising columns of the papers. A word 
about the new store for devotees of radio is not therefore out of place 
in these columns. Improvements are constantly being made in radio 
sets for the home and broken or worn out parts must be replaced. 
Apparatus for enabling more than one person to listen in at a time 
is now receiving expert attention and various devices are used. All 
these up-to-date sets and attachments are to be found here at home 
in Pasadena. Mr. Paul F. Johnson, who has spared no pains to 
complete his remarkable stock, has shown that no one need send away 
for anything in this line that is now on the market or at the command 
of local shops and investigators. 

If, as has been predicted, there will be 20,000,000 receiving sets in 
operation in 1927, then Pasadena may be expected to be the first to 
put in the wires with the house when it is built. 




The Most Complete- 
ly Equipped Radio 
Store in the South- 
west. 

PAUL FRANKLIN 
JOHNSON 
RADIO SALES & SERVICE 

Stork No. 1 
560 E. Colorado St.. Pasadena 

F. O. 3281 

Store No. 2 
S20 W. 7ih St., Los Angles 

Tel. 824-627 

Stori: No. 3 
306 E. Colorado St., Pasadena 



Phone, Colorado 5118 

H. O. CLARKE 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 



829 Earlham Street 



Pasadena, California 



Books . . . Toys 

Gulck Stationery Co. 

173 E. COLO. ST., Pasadena 
Fair Oaks 39 

Picture Framinir, Arti.t's Supplies 



THE 

Eleanor Miller School 

Expression and Music 
PASADENA 
Send for Catalogue 
Phone F. O. 3970 251 Oakland Are. 



QUALITY SERVICE 

THE ELITE 

DRY CLEANERS AND DYERS 
Plant: 797 So. Fair Oaks Ave. 
Colo. 1349 Pasadena, Cal. 




Pasadena Gas Appliance Co. 

Our Expert Estimators 
Can Solve Your Heating Problem 
Exclusively a Gas Appliance Store 
We Carry 
THE CLARK JEWEL GAS RANGE 
901 East Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 93 



WHY NOT HAVE THE BEST? 

American Laundry Co. 

Fair Oaks 514 
501 South Raymond Ave. 



Permutit Soft Water Saves 
Clothes 
TROY LAUNDRY 

In Business for Twenty Years 
Pasadena. Cal. Phone C. 146 

Alhambra 243 -J 



LAUNDERERS DRY CLEANERS 

Royal Laundry Co. 

461 So Raymond Colo, 67 

Pasadena, Calif. 



Qr 7T^" Batik 

( — a gown or negligee reflecting your 
own individuality.) 

527 California Terrace 

Phone Colo. 3655 



J. R. BRAGDON & CO. 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Rentals and Bargains 
15 So. Raymond Ave., Pasadena 



Claremont 

California 

Seat of 

POMONA 
COLLEGE 

which is charmingly 
featured in this issue 

Write the Chamber of 
Commerce of Clare- 
mont for further infor- 
mation. 



The place you have 
been looking for 

Glendora, 
California 

"The Pride of the 
Foothills" 

The beauty spot of the 
San Gabriel Valley in 
the heart of California's 
best Citrus district. 



oAltady 



ena 



The pretty suburb in the 

foothills of Pasadena where 

no cramped condition exists 
— where lots are large, views 
are attractive, and the climate 
more even than in the lower 

lands — the fogs are fewer 

the sun shines oftener. 

We invite to this section 
the home-seeker wishing these 
advantages in a suburb, not a 
city. 

Mountain water is plentiful 
and pleasant. 

All city conveniences are 
available. 

Consult us for information 
and property values in 
ALTADENA 

The Hogan Company 

Phone F. O. 849 
Altadena Office: 
Lake and Mariposa Streets 



POMONA, CALIFORNIA 

The Place Where You'd Like to Live 

POMONA has an estimated population of 16,500. The eleva- 
tion is 861 feet. Four strong banks and two building and 
loan associations have assets of $12,000,000. A Cainegie 
Library with 50,000 volumes. The city is the trade center for 
a population of over 40,000. The products within a ten-mile 
radius total annually about $35,000,000. Fine parks w!th picnic 
accommodations for over a thousand at one sitting, fine plunge 
and playground and a large and well-equipped public automobile 
camping ground. For further information address 
POMONA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



<£>0 YOU PREFER 

A Small Community with City Advantages 
Twenty Minutes from Los Angeles? 

EL MONTE 

hud of the Santa be Trail 

The most fertile district in the most productive county in the 
United States. School, Churches, and Real Neighbors. Products: 
Tons of walnuts, celery, cauliflower, etc., sugar beets, potatoes, 
milk. The ideal home site. 

EL MONTE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

California 



THE SAN GABRIEL VALLEY 



BALDWIN PARK 

One hundred per cent increase in popula- 
tion in the last three years 

Wonderful social conditions combined with farm- 
ing and orchard industries. 

Excellent schools, clubs and church facilities. 



Grow Up With San Gabriel 

THE Ideal Home City — With climate that no valley in the 
Southland can rival. 

An unending water supply for your rich, rich land. 
Two new, excellent schools under construction. And a class 
of residents that ANY would be pleased to live amongst. 

Visit the city beautiful. The home of the Great Mission Play. 
Just ten miles east from Los Angeles on Pacific Electric car line. 

SAN GABRIEL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



La Verne 

A Homelike College 
Town 

"Heart or 
the Orange 
Empire" 

Write to the Secretary 
of the Chamber of 
Commerce for descrip- 
tive booklet. 




^uente, 
Califc 



ornia 



Home of the world's 
largest walnut packing 
house. 



Home of 
Four Truck 



the Big 
plant. 

Home of the Big 
Golden Orange, the 
Yellow Lemon and the 
Lucious Avocado. 

W rite the Secretary 
of the Chamber of 
Commerce for free il- 
lustrated booklet. 



A beautiful illustrated 
booklet will be mailed 
to those who wish to 
know about 



^asadt 



'.ena 

California 

The Crown City of the 
San Gabriel Vallay 



Pasadena Chamber 



of C 



ommerce 




SOUTHLAND 




Courtesy of Cannell and Chafin Caihnes. Los Angeles, Califo 



From a Painting by Edward Pofthast 



THE PARKS OF LOS ANGELES » BRAND PARK 
HOME SITES IN THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY 
ART AS AN ADVERTISING AGENT OF CLIMATE 



No. 38 FEBRUARY, 1923 20 Cents 

CALIFORNIA'S HOME AND GARDEN MAGAZINE 




This Beautiful Home 

in Altadena, 1550 feet above sea level, above the 
winter fogs, where killing frosts are very rare, 
where the stars are undimmed by city lights, 
where the view on clear days extends from 100 
miles East to 105 miles West, and many miles of 
the shore-line of the Pacific are clearly visible, 
where country life has all city conveniences with- 
out the crowds and noises, is for sale at a reason- 
able figure by the owner. 

PAUL F. JOHNSON 

560 East Colorado Street Pasadena, California 

Fair Oaks 3281 



CHOICE COUNTRY PROPERTY 




FLINTRIDGE is today the 
scene of the greatest build- 
ing activity in its history. 

There is only one Flintridge — 
there is only just so much Flint- 
ridge. 

1 hose incomparable Flintridge 
homesites, overlooking moun- 
tains, fairway, parkland, lake and 
valley, will not be long available 
at present prices. 




Flintridge Sales Company 

727 Title Ins. Bldg.. Los Angeles. 
Tel: 10601. Main 685 
Tract Office: Fair Oaks 212 



AN ATTRACTIVE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY HILLTOP HOME 




NESTLED among the oak covered hills 
this charming modern home overlooks 
the beautiful San Fernando Valley 
through glorious picture windows giving en- 
chanting views of ever changing beauty through- 
out each day. 

It lias all the joys of country life: a private 
swimming pool, picnic grounds, bridle paths, 
golf course, and country club nearby; also a 
wonderful scenic boulevard to motor over into 
the city a few miles away. The grounds are 
eight and half acres, part in a fruit orchard. The 
house is ten rooms of modern comfort. It is 
for sale. 

JAMES FARRA 

With Nevin-Reed Company 

20 South Raymond Ave., Pasadena 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



3 



giiiiiiiini i tin in iiniiiiiiiiiu ii i i i iiiiiiitiimiiiiniiiniimis 

I SOUTHLAND I 
I CALENDAR 



aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiitiiiii 1 1 ii.i 1 1 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiB 

Announcements of exhibitions, fetes, 
concerts, club entertainments, etc., for 
the calendar pages are free of charge and 
should be received in the office of Cali- 
fornia Southland, Pasadena, at least 
two weeks previous to date of issue. No 
corrections can be guaranteed if they are 
received later than that date. 

The public is warned that photog- 
raphers have no authority to arrange for 
sittings, free of charge or otherwise, for 
publication in Southland unless appoint- 
ments have been made especially in writ- 
ing by the Editor. 



Clubs 



■If ALLEY HUNT CLUB: 
" The dates and programs for February 
are : 

Sunday evening suppers at seven 
o'clock ; programs are Feb. 4, Miss 
Anne Kavanaugh, "Stories of the 
Street and of the Town." 
Feb. 11, Piano Recital, Miss Edna 
Gunnar Peterson. 

Feb. 18, "Leaves From My Alpine 
Journal," a lecture by Mrs. Julia W. 
Henshaw, Fellow of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society, London ; illustrated 
by her own colored lantern slides. 
Feb. 25, Song Recital, Mrs. G. B. S. 
Steward, soprano. 

Thursday evenings, Bridge and Mah 
Jongg, eight o'clock. 

Feb. 1, 8, 15 and 22, Club prizes. Sup- 
per served 10 :30. 

Monday afternoons, Bridge and Mah 
Jongg. 

Feb. 5, 12, 19 and 26. Club prizes. 
Tea served at 4 :30. 

Mah Jongg Party, Friday evening, 
Feb. 16, seven o'clock. Club prizes. 
Special Club Dinner will be served at 
seven. 

A NN AND ALE GOLF CLUB: 

The afternoon bridge and tea parties 

will continue on Wednesday afternoons 

throughout the season. 

The second Friday of each month is 

open day at the club. 

Thursday evening, Feb. 15, Musicale. 

Saturday evening, Feb. 24, George 

Washington Dinner Dance. 

The usual Wednesday and Saturday 

Sweepstakes during February. 

E1LINTRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies' Day has been changed from 
Monday to the first Tuesday in every 
month. On every Ladies' Day the 
women golfers from the clubs in the 
Southern California Association will 
be welcome. 

T OS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB: 
*^ Ladies Days, second Monday of each 
month. 

Music during dinner, followed by 
dancing, every Saturday evening 
during the month. 

Luncheon served from 11 :30 to 2 
p. m. on Saturdays. 

Sunday night concerts during month 
twice a month. 

Tea served as requested and tables 
for cards always available. 

ILSHIRE COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies' Days, third Monday of each 
month. 

Dancing* every second and fourth 
Saturdays during the month. 
A musical is arranged for each Sun- 
day night in the month. 

jytlDWICK COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies' Days, fourth Monday in each 
month. 

Tea and informal bridge every after- 
noon. 

Polo, Wednesday and Saturday of 
each week. 

Dancing every Saturday night in the 
month. 

T OS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB: 

Dinner dances, Tuesday and Friday 
nights of every week. Tuesday night 
informal ; Friday night semi-formal. 
Plunge open to the ladies Tuesday and 
Friday of every week. 

T\/rONTECITO COUNTRY CLUB: 
i.YX p rov jd es an 18 hole golf course, two 
concrete and two dirt courts for ten- 
nis, bowls and croquet. 
Tea is served and informal bridge 
parties arranged as desired. 
A buffet supper is served every Sun- 
day night. 

EWPORT HARBOR YACHT CLUB: 
Extensive additions and improvements 
are planned for the club and will be 
completed before the opening of the 
yachting season. 

/CALIFORNIA YACHT CLUB: 

The new commanding officers of the 
Club took over the flag Saturday, 
January 20 : The officers are Com- 
modore, Eugene Overton ; Vice-Corn- 



w 



N 




Renier Ansloo Rembrandt 

ANNOUNCING THE OPENING 

OF THE 

CANNELL & CHAFFIN PRINT HOOMS 

We are devoting special galleries tn fine etchings, 
engravings and color-prints by ancient and modern 
masters of print-making. 

Now Showing — W his tier, Rembrandt, Etc. 

Coming Feb. 5th. Etchings by the Great French Modernists. 

Canneil S; Cfjaftm, 3nc. 

720 WEST SEVENTH STREET, LOS ANGELES 




Marshall 
Laird 



Specializing 

in the 
reproduction 
of the finer 

Spanish, 
Italian and 
English 
A ntique 
Furniture 



WORK SHOP: 

416 East Ninth Street 



LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA 



modore, Herbert L. Cornish ; Rear- 
Commodore, Benjamin P. Weston ; 
Fleet Captain, Paul Jeffers ; Port Cap- 
tain, J. T. Dickson; Fleet Surgeon, 
George Laubersheimer ; Judge Advo- 
cate, H. T. Morrow ; Fleet Secretary, 
C. E. W. Hubbell. 



Art 



rpHE Los Angeles Museum of History, 
Science and Art, Exposition Park, an- 
nounces : The Board of Governors and the 
Directors of the Los Angeles Museum of 
History, Science and Art, will hold a re- 
ception for the visiting members of the 
Western Association of Art Museum Di- 
rectors on the occasion of the opening of 
Western paintings in the Gallery of Fine 
and Applied Arts, Friday, February Sec- 
ond, from three to six o'clock. 

Second annual traveling Exhibition of 
Western painters, opening February 1st 
and continuing through the month. 

Wood block prints and etchings, shown in 
the print rooms, by May and Frances 
Gearhart, Feb. 1 to 13. 

The Print Makers' Society will hold the 
fourth International Exhibition during the 
month of March. 

rpHE Southwest Museum, Marmion Way 
and Avenue 46, Los Angeles, announces 
the following programs for February : 

Feb. 3, Music. Monte Vista School Or- 
chestra. Talk, "Lo I The Chinese Mer- 
chant Comes, Hear His Gongs 1" Mr. Her- 
bert E. House. 

Feb. 4, Music, Courtesy of Carl Bron- 
son. Lecture, "The Russian Peasant's 
Expression of Art." By Baroness Otili de 
Ropp. 

Feb. 10, Music, Courtesy Page School for 
Girls. Talk, "The Home Beautiful." Story 
for boys and girls. By Mrs. Henrietta H. 
Kapps, Courtesy Barker Bros. 

Feb. 11, Music, Hilda Brockway, 
Pianiste. Lecture, "Havasupai Indians," 
by Frederick R. Maude. 

Feb. 17, Music, Miss Rose A. Borch, 
Bird and Flower songs. Talk, "The Story 
of the Butterfly," illustrated. By Dr. 
John A. Comstock, Director. 

Feb. 18, Music, Chorus of Bullocks' De- 
partment Store, under the direction of Miss 
Antonette Sabel. Lecture, "Wonders of 
the Insect World." By Dr. John A. Com- 
stock, Director. 

Feb. 24, Music, courtesy of Southwestern 
College of Music. Talk, "Legends and 
Stories on California Wild Flowers." By 
Mrs. Francis M. Fultz. 

Feb. 25, Music, Samuel Pettigrew (In- 
dian I Baritone, Ruth Zuckerman, Pianiste, 
Rebecca Golub, Pianiste. Lecture, "The 
Life of a Butterfly." Illustrated. By Dr. 
John A. Comstock, Director. 

Butterfly exhibit opens Feb. 5. Classes 
wishing to attend, please make reservations 
a few days in advance. 

rpHE Miniature Painters' Society of Cali- 
fornia will hold their annual exhibition 
at the Canneil & Chaffin Galleries Jan- 
uary 29 to February 10th inclusive. It 
will be a most notable showing of the 
newest works by our own local artists in 
this beautiful and aristocratic medium. 

TyjARION KAVANAUGH WACHTEL will 
show her latest and finest water-colors 
at the Canneil & Chaffin Galleries from 
February 12th to March 10th, inclusive. 
Mrs. Watchel's superb, colorful rendition 
of the epic grandeur of California needs 
no introduction to lovers of the beautiful. 

TAAVID EDSTROM, the Swedish-Ameri- 
can sculptor's exhibition will be held 
February 12-24th, inclusive at the Canneil 
& Chaffin Galleries. His heroic conception 
of "Man Triumphant" has received much 
favorable comment in the press. 

rpHE Group of Independents will hold 
their first show at the MacDowell 
Club through the month of February. The 
officers of the Group are, George H. Fisher, 
president, Desmond V. Rushton, secretary ; 
Sophia Lerner Fisher, treasurer. Com- 
munications may be addressed to the secre- 
tary, 631 Bryson Bldg. 

DAUL SWAN, painter, sculptor, and 
dancer, will exhibit through February 
at the Stendahl galleries, Hotel Ambassa- 
dor, portraits in oil, and pieces of sculpture. 

J-JAVID ANTHONY TAUSZKY is now 
installed in the studio on the roof of 
Vista del Arroyo, Pasadena, where he has 
just finished a portrait of Wanda Hawley, 
the film star. Two recent portraits by 
Mr. Tauszky, one of Captain Paul Peri- 
gord, (14th French Infantry) loaned by 
Dr. and Mrs. James McBride, and one 
which he calls "Youth," are very charm- 
ingly hung on the walls at the Vista. 

T. DWIGHT BRIDGE of Santa Barbara, 
" held an exhibition of fourteen portraits 
and four decorative panels in one of the 
galleries of Canneil and Chaffin, Los An- 
geles, during January. The artist was a 
pupil of Albert Herter at the Art Students' 
League of New York, and has been living 
in Santa Barbara for about three years, 
where Albert Herter has established his 
permanent studio. 

fUY ROSE held a one-man show at the 
" opening of Stendahl's gallery in Hotel 
Vista Del Arroyo in January. 

TJALPH M. PEARSON will exhibit his 
" etchings in the Public Library at 
Long Beach, during February. 



4 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




RUINS OF TEMPLES AT BAALBEK, 
SYRIA. 

REPRODUCTION of a carte postale rc- 
*• ceived from Mrs. Parker Earle. now 
traveling in Egypt. 

rpHE Metropolitan Museum of Art in New 
York and other American museums are 
expected to receive some of the articles 
discovered in the fabulolusly rich tomb of 
King Tutankhamon by the Earl of Carnar- 
von and Howard Carter, but the amount 
which the Egyptian government will per- 
mit to be taken out of the country has 
not fveen decided. 

Announcements 

/OFFICERS and directors of the Assistance 
" League, elected Jan. 23. to serve during 
1923 : Mrs. Hancock Banning, President : 
Mrs. Homer Laughlin, First Vice Presi- 
dent ; Mrs. R. D. Shepherd, Second Vice 
President; Mrs. Robert M. Weed. Third 
Vice President ; Mrs. E. P. Werner, Execu- 
tive Secretary, Mr. D. C. MacWaters. 
Treasurer. 

(Preceding six names should also be in- 
cluded on Board of Directors!: 

DIRECTORS 
Mrs. Arthur Wright, Mr. D. C. MacWaters, 
Mrs. E. R. Collins, Mrs. Page Warden. 
Mrs. Edward Doheney, Mrs. Will S. Hook. 
Mrs. Joseph T. Hixon, Mrs. Kirk Johnson, 
Mrs. Lee Allen Phillips, Mrs. William Rus- 
sell. Mrs. F'rederick Seares, Mrs. Godfrey 
HelterhorT, Mrs. Charles F. Gray, Mrs. 
W. J. Jewett, Mrs. Geo. Leslie Smith, 
Mrs. John H. Henry, Mrs. W. A. Edwards, 
Mrs. E. Avery McCarthy, Mrs. Harry Lom- 
bard, Mrs. Stuart W. French. Mrs. Willis 
G. Hunt, Mrs. J. W. Montgomery. Mrs. 
F. Gates Allen, Mrs. Gurdeon Wattles, 
Mrs. Edwin J. Marshall, Mrs. Fred E. 
Keeler. Mrs. Giles Hall, Mrs. Wm. Gibbs 
McAdoo, Mrs. Charles Jeffras, Mrs. Henry 
M. Robinson. 

A LINE BARRET GREENWOOD will give 
a series of Current Monthly Reviews 
in the Palm Room of The Maryland, Pasa- 
dena, Monday mornings at eleven o'clock. 
The dates are January 29, February 2S, 
and April 30. Each review includes cur- 
rent world events, books and their authors, 
music and art, new plays. 
npiIE Pasadena Public Library issues an 
invitation to attend the two Book 
Talks to be given by Miss Helen E. Haines 
in February and March. The dates and 
subjects are: Thursday evening, Febru- 
ary 8: Life and Literature in the United 
States. Thursday evening. March 8: Our 
classic heritage, as revealed in the Loeb 
Classical Library and recent books on 
Greece and Rome. 

rpHURSDAY, January 11th, Bishop H. 

Johnson officiated at the ground-break- 
ing ceremonies of St. Paul's Cathedral to 
be built on South Figueroa street, Los 
Angeles. It is proposed to begin con- 
struction at once and to have the struc- 
ture finished by the first of February. 
1924. Johnson, Kaufman and Coats are the 
architects. 

rpHE calendar cf the Community Players 
of Pasad?na, in The Community Play- 
house, for the month is: 

Feb. 5-10, "My Lady's Dress," by Edward 
Knoblauch. 

Feb. 19-24, "Love's Labours Lost," by 
William Shake pzare. 

WALTER WEBBER. William Field 
Staunton, Jr., and Sumner Maurice 
Spaulding announce the formation of a 
partnership for the practice of architecture 
and engineering under the firm name of 
Webber, Staunton & Spaulding, 101" 
Hibernian Building, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. Telephone Pico 440. 
JOHN COWPER POWYS. distinguished 
" English lecturer, philosopher, poet, 
lectures on The Complex of Nations, in the 
Patio, Vista del Arroyo, Pasadena. Cali- 
fornia. Thursday mornings at 11:00. Feb. 
1st, France or the Art of Life Anatol 
France. February 8th, Germany's Contri- 



When Robin 
Hood Gave 
Money Away 

Those bags of money, which Robin Hood so boldly 
took from the rich and gave so liberally to the poor, 
undoubtedly contained many a coin made from 
silver imported into England by the "Easterlings." 

They were an organization of merchants from 
Eastern Germany, whose silver alloy was so pure 
as to be gradually adopted by the English as a 
standard. It was just about the time of Robin 
Hood that this standard silver was being given the 
name of "Sterling," which is simply an abbrevia- 
tion of "Easterling." 

That was in the twelfth century. Ever since then 
"Sterling" has meant solid silver, and now by 
statute is defined in England and America as con- 
taining 925-10()0ths pure silver. 

Many centuries older than its name is the esteem 
for Sterling felt by all nations. In the palaces of 
Rome — in the baronial halls of England — in the 
chateaux of France — the keenest pride has uni- 
versally been felt in its possession. 




In the modern home, Sterling is enjoyed in far 
greater variety than anciently. Complete serv- 
ices of both flatware and hollow ware for the 
table, besides candelabra, and other ornamen- 
tal pieces, are all available at surprisingly 
moderate cost. 

'Visitors Welcome 

Brock 6 Company 

515 West Seventh Street 

^Between Olive and Grand~ 

"The House of Perfect 'Diamonds" 



bution to the World — Bismarck. February 
15th, England or the Secret of Individual- 
ism — Lloyd George. February 22nd, Russia 
or the Unknown Future- Dostoievsky. 

JLJILNOR AND MUMPER invite you to 
visit The Yellow Lantern Shop, Ray- 
mond Hotel, Pasadena. A beautiful and 
unusual selection of jades, crystals, ivories, 
ambers, kimonos, Haori coats and Spanish 
shawls are shown. 

Vy. B. LUCAS, of Washington. D. C, 
until recently connected with the U. S. 
Shipping Board, has arrived in Los Angeles 
to act as director of concessions for the 
first annual American Historical Revu? 
and Motion Picture Exposition, to be given 
in Exposition Park here next June under 
the auspices of the motion picture industry 
as an international celebration of the 
Monroe Doctrine's hundredth anniversary. 
Mr. Lucas accompanied the returning dele- 
gation which went to Washington to 
invite President Harding to attend the 
Premiere of the Revue and Exposition. 

rpHE Opportunity Club invites you to be 
present at its Annual Charily Card 
Party (proceeds for local charity t Hotel 
Maryland, Pasadena, Wednesday afternoon, 
February Tth. Reservations, Mrs. C. Z. 
Jackson. 1477 North Raymond avenue. 
Phone Fair Oaks 1228. 

THE Ambassador Hotel Corporation takes 
pleasure in announcing the appoint- 
ment of Benjamin L. Frank as Manager of 
The Ambassador, Los Angeles. 

THE PASADENA LECTURE COURSE 



The Pasadena Lecture Course on Current 
Topics given for the past three seasons will be 
continued during that of 1923. The lectures 
will be held in the auditorium annex of tie 
California Institute of Technology, corner of 
Wilton Avenue and California Street, on 
Tuesdays at 4:30 p. m. The object of the 
lectures will remain the same, to encourage 
the intelligent discussion of public affairs. 

Arrangements, which are necessarily subjeo 
to change, have been made as follows: 

RAYMOND ROBINS 
January 16" — "America's Answer lo the Bol- 
shevik Challenge." 
DR. JAMES A. B. BCHERER 
January 23 — "Prohibition Enforcement." 
MRS. VERNON KELLOGG 
Associate of the Belgian Relief Commiltion 
January 30 — "The New Women of Europe." 
DR. EDWARD THOMAS WILLIAMS 
rnircrjify of California 
February 13 — "Political Conditions in China." 
PAYSON TREAT 
Stanford U nii-ersity 
February 20 — "Japan Since the Washington 
Conference." 

DR. ROBERT A MILLIKAN 
February 27 — "Gulliver's Travels in Science." 

DIIAN GOPAL MIKERJI 
March 13 — "The Personality of Ghandi; Its 
Effect on India." 

FIRMIN ROZ 
Of the French Academy 
March 20 — "French Opinion and the Political 
Problems of Today." 

EDWIN MINIS 
Professor of History at landerbilt University 
March 27— (Subject to be announced.) 

BURGES JOHNSON 
Associate Professor of English. I aisar College 
April 3 — "The Distortion of News." 

S. K. RATCLIFFF. 
Special Correspondent of the "Manchester 
Guardian" 

April 17— "The Changing British Empire." 

MME. PIERRE PONAFIDINE 
April 24 — "My Experiences in Soviet Russia" 

HUGH WAI.POLE 
Friday Evening, April 27, at 8:15— "The 
Realists — Bennett, Wells and Galsworthy." 
UNDER THE AUPICES 
of 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gates Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold O. Ayer 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Barrett 

Mr. and Mrs Frank F. Carpenter 

Mrs. M. Ringen Drummond 

Mr. Arthur Fleming 

Mr. and Mrs. Tod Ford 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanton W. Forsman 

Dr. and Mrs. George E. Hale. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Stevens Halsted 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hixon 

Mrs. Howard Huntington 

Mr. and Mrs. William K. Jcwctt 

Rt. Rex and Mrs. Joseph II. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. John McWilliams. Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. James MiBridc 

Miss Mary B. McDougall 

Mrs. A. Moss Merwin 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Millikan 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pitcairn 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Stevens 

Mrs. Katherii.c Wauon 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Sellers 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Harold O. Ayer 
Mrs Frank F. Carpenter 
Miss Teresa Cloud 
Mr-. George E Hale 
Mi - Mary B. McDougall 
Mrs. Robert Pitcairn 

TREASURER 
Mr. Frank F. Carpenter 
309 Slavin Bldg. 

COURSE AND~SLNGLE TICKETS 
Course Tickets, *I0; Single Tickets. $\. 
Those desiring course tickets are requested 
to send name and check to the Treasurer. 

Checks should be made payable to Frank 
F. Carpenter, Treasurer. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



5 



HTHE CALIFORNIA ART CLUB has de- 
cided to hold monthly exhibitions of 
varying character during this year, at the 
temporary galleries at 1027 West Seventh 
St., Los Angeles, and artists of the Club 
are invited to submit works under the fol- 
lowing conditions : 

The first exhibition begins Feb. 15th, 
and will consist of typical California sub- 
jects, from "High Sierras" to the ocean, 
including landscape, desert, street or city 
subjects, or anything typical of Califor- 
nia, with this exception, please note: No 
figures or portrait subjects. These may be 
given a special exhibition later on. This 
is a California exhibit and only typical 
subjects such as mentioned will be 
exhibited. 

Submit only works in color. Black and 
white will not be acceptable. Small or 
medium sized canvasses are preferred, and 
let them be your very best. 

All paintings to be delivered by the 
artist at the galleries at 1027 West Sev- 
enth Street, between 1 and 5 p. m., not 
later than Sat., Feb. 10th, 1923. 

fpHE exhibition of paintings by Guy Rose 
at the Stendahl Galleries in the Vista 
del Arroyo, Pasadena, will be followed 
by a showing of the work of Orrin White, 
beginning Feb. 17th. The gallery is open 
to visitors every afternoon and until eight 
o'clock in the evening, and at other hours 
by appointment. 

A CTIVITIES at the Stickney Art School 
Pasadena, are still increasing. There 
is now a small group working from the 
costumed model from nine until eleven- 
thirty every morning ; and the night group 
has become so large that the number of 
sessions will probably be increased from 
three nights a week to four or five. Re- 
cruits from both afternoon and evening 
classes have formed the habit of going out 
in a body to paint the trees and moun- 
tains whenever they can find an oppor- 
tunity, an especially helpful arrangement 
for beginners in landscape painting, and 
those who have not been in Pasadena long 
enough to know what there is to paint. 

rpHE CALIFORNIA ART CLUB an- 
nounces : 

Next meeting Saturday, Feb. 3rd at 8, 
at Club House, 623 Park View St., 
Board of Control at 7 :30, interesting 
program. Madam Sprotte will talk on 
Bohemian Folk Songs, illustrated with 
vocal and instrumental selections. Dr. 
and Mrs. George McCoy will be the 
guests of honor. 

The University of Southern California 
invites the members of the Club to 
their First Annual Exhibition of Paint- 
ings by California artists, in the Ad- 
ministration Building, 35th St. and 
University Ave. Opening Reception 
Friday evening, Feb. 23rd, 8 to 11, and 
Tea, Sunday, Feb. 25th, 3 to 5 p. m. 
West Jefferson or University cars. 

T OUIS HOVEY SHARP announces his 
Annual Exhibition of paintings of the 
Southwest. LeRoy D. Ely Gallery, 335 
East Colorado St., Pasadena, February 1st 
to 28th, 1923. 

TV/fAX WEICZOREK exhibited his portrait 
of Ruth St. Denis in the annual com- 
bined exhibition of the American Water 
Color Society and the New York Water 
Color Club, after showing it for some weeks 
in Boston. 

rpHE first comprehensive showing of 
works by French Modernists in etch- 
ing, lithography and wood block, will be 
held in the Print Rooms of the Cannell & 
Chaffin Galleries from the 5th to the 19th 
of February. This exhibition contains 
examples by Degas, Manet, Toulouse-Laut- 
rec, Derain, Picasso, Besnard, Gaugin, 
Steinlen, Legrand, Larsson, Sequin, Viu- 
arlde, and others of the new schools. These 
Print Rooms are providing a resort for 
collectors and lovers of fine prints. Arthur 
H. Millier is curator of prints. 

A MONG the portraits exhibited by David 
" Anthony Tauszky recently at the Can- 
nell and Chaffin galleries were those of the 
two sons of Victor H. Clark, Edwin and 
Woodruff of Hollywood. Mr. Tauszky is 
now doing a portrait of Mrs. Clark. 

An exhibition of modern paintings by 
Peter Krasnow was held in the McDowell 
Club, Tajo Building, Los Angeles, January 
1st to February 1st, galleries open daily 
ten to five, Sundays, two to five. 



Music 



rpHE dates and the artists of the Philhar- 
monic Artist Courses, presented by 
L. E. Behymer during February are : 
Evenings February 6 and 8, Feodor Chali- 
apin ; Matinees, February 10 and 16, Josef 
Hofmann ; and 21 and 25, Ignace Pader- 
ewski. March 3, matinee, Theo Karle. 

rpHE Philharmonic Orchestra, Walter 
Henry Rothwell, conductor, announces 
that beginning February 4, the orchestra 
will give four special Sunday afternoon 
concerts, each devoted to a particular pro- 
gram. The first to be an all French pro- 
gram, including the Saint-Saens concerto 
No. 4 in C minor, played by Annie Altman, 
Russian pianist. The second to be an all 
Wagner program, with Theo Karle, tenor, 
as soloist. The third concert will be an all 
Tschaikowski, Russian violinist as soloist. 
The fourth will be made up of selections 
from the work of living Americr.n com 
posers, with Estelle Heart-Drefus, con- 
tralto, as soloist. 




JOHNS.KESHISHYAN 



640 Joiifb ^Osroac/uKvy 







'Or 



ck 



Saturdays 



rpHE February concerts of the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra, Los Angeles, Walter 
Henry Rothwell, Conductor, are as follows: 

Wednesday evening, Feb. 1 — Fullerton. 
Symphony concert, auspices, Fullerton 
Union High School. 

Sunday afternoon, Feb. 4 — 3 :00 o'clock, 
seventh popular concert, Philharmonic 
Auditorium. 

Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 6 — 4 :00 o'clock, 
School concert, Philharmonic Auditorium. 

Friday afternoon, 3 :00 o'clock — Saturday 
evening, 8 :30 o'clock, February 9-10 — 
Ninth Symphony concert. Philharmonic 
Auditorium. 

Friday afternoon and evening, Feb. 12. 

School concert and Symphony concert, 
Spreckel's Theatre, San Diego. 

Thursday evening, Feb. 15 — Pasadena. 
Second symphony concert. High School 
Auditorium. 

Sunday afternoon, Feb. 18 — 3:00 o'clock. 
Eighth popular concert, Philharmonic 
Auditorium. 

Tuesday afternoon at 4 :00 o'clock — Feb. 
20. School concert, Philharmonic Audi- 
torium. 

Wednesday night, Feb. 21 — Santa Monica 
Symphony concert, auspices, The Woman's 
Club. 

Friday afternoon, 3 :00 o'clock ; Saturday 
evening, 8:30 o'clock, Feb. 23-24. Tenth 
Symphony concert, Philharmonic Audi- 
torium. 

Monday night, Feb. 26 — Santa Barbara. 
Second symphony concert, Potter Theatre, 
auspices. Civic Music Association. 

Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 28 — Orange. 
Symphony concert, auspices, Orange High 
School. 

TN the Pacific Conservatory, College of 
the Pacific, the Artist Course has been 
placed upon the basis of several years ago, 
with four artists appearing before the 
student body and the San Jose public 
twice each semester. The first recital was 
given in November by Marcel Dupre, and 
the second in January by Herbert Gould. 
The artists of the second semester are 
Freida Peycke, in musically illustrated 
readings, March 20, and Jessie Isabel Chris- 
tian, who will provide the closing recital 
of the May Festival on May 29th. 
rpHE University Club of Pasadena has in- 
augurated a series of Sunday after- 
noon musicals. In January the program 
was arranged by Will Rounds, conductor of 
the Pasadena Community Orchestra. The 
February musical will be under the direc- 
tion of Arthur Farwell ; Merle Armitage, 
of the Fitzgerald Concert Direction, will 
provide the March program. 
TN February, the Los Angeles Oratorio 
Society, John Small, Manager, is to 
sing Paolo Gallico's "The Apoclypse," 
which won the $1,000 prize offered by the 
National Federation of Musical Clubs for 
the best oratorio by an American. "Sam- 
son and Delilah" in concert form is sched- 
uled to end the season, May 1. 
fT*HE next concert of the Los Angeles 
Chamber Music Society will be given 
Thursday evening, February 1st, Gamut 
Club Theatre, Los Angeles. 
rpHE Fitzgerald Concert Direction, Merle 
Armitage, Manager, will present Titta 
Ruffo, of the Metropolitan Opera Company, 
in concert at the Philharmonic Audi- 
torium, Los Angeles, March 9th. 
fPHE recently organized Pasadena Quintet 
is composed of the following artists: 
Oscar Seiling, first violin, Arthur Gramm, 
second violin : Adolph Tandler, viola ; Her- 
bert Riley, 'cellist, and Mrs. Alice Cole- 
man-Batchelder, pianist. The Quintet has 
announced they will give three concerts 
in Pasadena this season, under the auspices 
of the Pasadena Music and Art Associa- 
tion, and other concerts in Los Angeles. 
TTNDER the Fitzgerald Concert Direction, 
Merle Armitage, Manager, two concerts 
were given by Erwin Nyiregyhazi, pianist, 
during January, in the Philharmonic 
Auditorium, Los Angeles. 



THE Ellis Club of Los Angeles wil 
pear in concert February 7. 



ap- 



I^HE Los Angeles Trio, May MaeDonald 
Hope, pianist, Ilya Bronson, 'cellist, 
and Calmon Lubovski, violinist, announces 
the date of the fourth concert has been 
changed from February 8 to February 9, 
at the Ebell Auditorium. Jay Plowe, flutist, 
will assist. 

TJEGINNING Monday evening, Feb. 12, 
the San Carlo Opera Company Com- 
pany, Philharmonic Auditorium, Los An- 
geles, presents the following operas : 
Feb. 12, La Tosca ; Feb. 13, Madame But- 
terfly ; Feb. 14, Aida; Feb. 15, Martha. 
(Matinee) ; Feb. 15, La Boheme, (Eve- 
ning) : Feb. 16, Rigoletto ; Feb. 17, Car- 
men, (Matinee) ; Feb. 17, II Trovatore. 
(Evening); Feb. 19, La Gioconda ; Feb. 
20, Madame Butterfly; Feb. 21, Jewels of 
the Madonna; Feb. 22, Faust, (Matinee): 
Feb. 22, Cavalleria, (Evening) ; Feb. 23, 
Lohengrin; Feb. 24, Salome, (Matinee). 

TTNDER the auspices of the Pasadena 
Music and Art Association, the San 
Carlo Grand Opera Company will appear 
in Pasadena the evening of February 24. 

IT<HE soloist appearing with the Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra in Pasadena. 
Thursday evening, February 15, is Theo 
Karle, tenor. 

T TNI VERSITY of Southern California 
*^ Women's Club present Mischa Elman. 
violinist, Feb. 5, and the Tony Sarg Mar- 
ionettes, March 9, in the Bovard Audi- 
torium, Los Angeles. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



13th National 

ORANGE 
SHOW 

San Bernardino 

February 16-26, 1923 

An Exposition of Beauty 
Where Reigns 
King Orange 
in Gorgeous Display 

GREAT INDUSTRIAL 
SECTION 

Amusements and Enter- 
tainment for All, featuring 
Santa Monica Municipal 
Band of 40 Artists — 18 
Soloists — with Carol Bra- 
vo and Ethelyn Ostrom in 
Grand Opera. 

10 Regular Trains Daily 
From Los Angeles 

PA C I F I C 
ELECTRIC 
RAILWAY 

O. A. Smith 
Passenger Traffic Manager 
Los Angeles 



La Solano 

A quiet, well-appointed small 
hotel on the West Side near 
Orange Grove Avenue. 

Expert 
Service 

Grand Ave. and Lockhaven St. 



Certified 
Milk 



Particular Milk 
For Particular People 

Arden Dairy Farms 

have produced this high quality 
milk, exclusively, for particular 
families of Los Angeles County 
for sixteen years. 



Distributed by 
CRESCENT CREAMERY CO. 



California Southland 



M. Urmy Seares 

Ellen Leech - 



Editor and Publisher 
- Assistant Editor 



No. 38 



FEBRUARY, 1923. 




CONTENTS 

PAGE 

A Painting by Potthast Cover Design 

(From the Cunnel and Chaffin Galleries) 

The Memory Garden, Brand Park. .Mrs. Martha Nelson McCan 7 

California for Painters Medora Clark 9 

Richard Miller in Pasadena M. Urmy Seares 10 

The Art of Etching Arthur Milliar 12 

The Desert, Verse Anita Scott Lavanigno 13 

A California Game Preserve Alcyon Robinson 13 

Southland Opinion 15 

A Speech by Robert Millikan. 
A Book by John Buchan. 

A House of Influences Ellen Leech 1(5 

Recent Books E. Taylor Houghton 18 

The Small House Competition Sumner Spaulding 19 

The Birds in Griffith Park Theresa Hornet Patterson 20 

The Lure of Beads Edna Gearhart 21 

Recent Radio Developments Paul R. Johnson 22 

The Money Market Leslie B. Henry 23 

In the Search of a Homesite Elizabeth Whiting 24 

Some Southland Styles 24 

San Fernando Valley James A. Farra 25 

The Town of San Fernando , Bess Munn 26 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND is published monthly at Pasadena, Cal. 

One dollar and twenty cents for six issues, two dollars for twelve 
For extra copies or back numbers call Main 408i, L. A. News Co. 
Copyright. 1922, by M. Urmy Scares 
Entered as second class matter, July 28, 1919, at the Post Office at Pasadena, 
California, under Act of March 3. 1879. 

ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT AND RATES 
For Pasadena advertising call Colorado 7005 
For Los Angeles advertising call 820130 
or address California Southland, Advertising Manager, 
Pasadena, California. 



The... 

RAYMOND 

Opens 

December 28, 1922 

PASADENA 
Southern California 

Walter Raymond, 

Proprietor 




History of California 
The American Period 

By Robert G. Cleland 

Is ready and completes our 
history of the state. The first 
volume is 

History of California 
The Spanish Period 

By Charles E. Chapman 
Price $4.00 each 

THE MACM1LLAN CO. 
Publishers, San Francisco 



Hawaii The Orient 

TRAVEL? 

travel service bureau 

"Tickets to All the World" 

507 So. Spring St., Loa Angeles 

Alexandria Hotel Bldg. Main 410 
Raymond and Whitcomb Tours 



South America 



Europe 



A cordial invitation is extended to 
visit the ALOIS FREY FREESIA 
GARDENS at Chatsnorth Drive 
and Woodley Ave., San Fernando. 
Many brilliant varieties in bloom 
during February and March. 




L'ART DECORATIF 

With Parker Judge Co. 
1255 West Sixth Street, Los Angeles 

Phone 581 107. MLLE. Sr.MON, Manager. 
Old English crewel embroidery, Spanish 
applique work, French Batik, gold 
leaf on velvet stained glass velvet. 
For wall hangings, balcony throws, 
piano drapes, cushions, lamp shades. 



Draperies 



Antique Furniture 



Oscar Maurer 

Portrait Photographer 

Portrailt Taktn in Your 
Own Qardin 
Studio 3863 W. Sixth St. 
068347 Los Angeles, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF NATIONAL INTEREST 



- - 



THE PARKS OF LOS ANGELES— BRAND PARK, SAN FERNANDO 

% MARTHA NELSON McCAN, Chairman of the Board, Los Angeles Park Commission. 



BRAND PARK, in the San Fernando Valley, comprises about seven 
acres of land situated between Brand Boulevard and Mission 
Street, directly in front of the old Spanish Mission at San Fernando. 

This strip of land was presented to the City of Los Angeles by the 
Mission Land Company, at the solicitation of the women of San Fer- 
nando, who saw the possibility of the fruit packing industry encroach- 
ing upon this territory until the old Mission should be entirely hidden 
from view. 

On November 4, 1920, the land was formally accepted by the City 
Council and dedicated for park purposes. 

The remoteness from the city of this park and lack of funds pre- 
vented the Park Commission from developing or improving this newly 
acquired property until the Spring of 1921, when the Commission 
conceived the idea of endeavoring to bring back the old atmosphere 



designs to be incorporated in plans of the Memory Garden. This trip 
of over 1600 miles by automobile consumed more than a week's time. 
Most of the Missions were visited; many valuable suggestions re- 
ceived, and a large collection of cuttings' of various plants, shrubs, 
and vines brought back to be propagated for the garden. The names' 
of the plants and the Missions from which they came will be inscribed 
on labels. From some of the Missions, old tiles were donated for use 
in portions of the work. 

After study of all the gardens, it was decided to model a Memory 
Garden similar to the Sacred Garden at Santa Barbara Mission, 
which was laid out in geometrical design and is the only example of 
a Mission type garden now in existence. Work was started on the 
preparation of plans and drawings, and methods devised for financing 
the scheme. The project was endorsed by practically every woman's 




Bronsoa Dt C.ou 

THE SAN FERNANDO MISSION SEEN THROUGH THE WEEPING WILLOW TREE IN THE OLD GARDEN. THE FOUNTAIN ON THE RIGHT HAS BEEN 
RETAINED AND THE LARGER STAR-SHAPED FOUNTAIN HAS BEEN PLACED IN THIS PARK, WHICH IS NOW BEING MADE INTO A REPLICA OF THE 

OLD MISSION GARDEN OF THE PADRES. 



which belongs to this park by virtue of having been part of the 
grounds of the old San Fernando Mission. 

The romance of old Spain still dwells among the fast crumbling 
ruins of the California Missions and it was the idea of the Park Com- 
missioners in designing this memory garden to preserve the historical 
relics on the property and to construct a replica of a Mission garden, 
incorporating therein some of the old world ideas of landscaping, 
brought to this country by the Padres. It was, therefore, arranged 
by action of the Board that the writer should go as a Commissioner 
and visit the Missions of this State during the month of April, 1922, 
for the purpose of gathering data on landscape and architectural 



club and civic organization in Los Angeles and most earnestly sup- 
ported by the residents of the San Fernando Valley, who have no 
other recreation center aside from Brand Park. The City Council 
made an initial appropriation to start the work and the people of San 
Fernando Valley procured subscriptions from numerous persons and 
organizations in that district, while the writer received many large 
private contributions from individuals and organizations. A total of 
$7000 was subscribed for this worthy enterprise, the City Council 
agreeing to appropriate dollar for dollar raised by private subscrip- 
tion. It is estimated that the complete cost of the park will amount 
to $25,000. 



8 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



There is nothing of a religious nature connected with the garden 
and for this reason, all creeds endorsed the work and lent their finan- 
cial assistance and moral support. 

On privately owned land adjoining the park, which at one time was 
a portion of the Mission property, there was an old star-shaped foun- 
tain, built by the Indians over 125 years ago and copied by the Padres 
from one which existed at Cordova, Spain. The owners of this foun- 
tain graciously offered it to the Park Commission. On June 6, 1922, 
this huge mass of cement, brick and tile, weighing some fifty tons, 
was moved safely into the park, where it rests near a smaller foun- 
tain with which it was originally connected as a part of the old 
Mission irrigating system. The fountain is 30 feet in diameter and 
has a capacity of 1600 gallons. A bronze tablet reciting the history 
of this fountain was placed at the base. 

Interesting and impressive ceremonies were held in connection with 
the fountain moving, which were attended by many of the old pioneer 
families. On July 4, 1922, the fountain was dedicated and officially 
presented to the City by Mr. L. C. Brand of the Mission Land Com- 
pany, who arrived at the park in his aeroplane and presented the city 
a bill of sale for the fountain. Speeches were made by prominent 
people, followed by a barbecue and old fashioned Spanish festival, 
with display of fireworks in the evening. 

The old masonry vats that were used centuries ago for the render- 
ing of tallow are still in existence on a portion of the park property 
and these will be preserved. It is also intended to restore an old 




A PAINTER'S DAY OVER THE ARROYO SECO. WHICH WILL BE PRESERVED 
AS A NATURAL PARK. THE ROAD ON THE WEST HANK RUNS PAST 
FLINTRIDGE AND THROUGH MONTE VISTA VALLEY TO THE SAN FER- 
NANDO VALLEY. 

adobe building which may be utilized as a small repository for the 
display of various objects of historical interest. 

There is talk of abandoning the Administration building of the 
Mission which is now being used temporarily for religious services; 
the remains of the old church are back of the present Mission. In 
the event that this is done it is hoped that sufficient funds may be 
realized for repairing the structure and turning it into a spacious 
Museum building. 

The property is bordered by two wide city streets, affording ample 
parking space for automobiles. The park is now becoming a mecca 
for winter tourists. 

The Memory Garden occupies one and one-half acres of the seven- 



acre plot. Solid concrete standards, in Mission style, with ax-hewn 
timbers placed on top, form pergolas at the northern and southern 
ends of the garden. On the eastern and western sides, there is a 
concrete Mission wall rising to a height of four feet, capped with 
Spanish tile. Entrance gates are provided on two sides of the park. 
There is also an attractive waiting station erected on the eastern 
side for the accommodation of street car passengers of the interurban 
line, which passes the park. 

The design of the garden reverts back to days in Europe when 
all gardenesque ideas were expressd in conventional and geometrical 
design. The formal landscape arrangement consists of diagonal, right 
angle, semi-circular and oval designed gravel paths, the intersections 
providing numerous flower beds. History informs us that the Padres 
loved flowers and the flora of their native Spain and Mexico with 
native California flowers predominated at San Fernando Mission in 
the early days. In keeping with this sentiment, a profusion of sweet- 
smelling flowers will bloom in the Memory Garden. This Mission was 
one of the last to be built and was noted for its flowers, many of 
which were native wild flowers, grown from seed gathered by the 
Indians from surrounding hills and valleys. 

The central portion of the design will be devoted to native Cali- 
fornia trees, shrubs and flowers as follows: Palo Verde, penstemons, 
carpenterias and bush nimulus. Hollies, Matilija poppies, yellow 
tree poppy, sage, lupines and blue curls. 

Outer borders will be planted with the direct descendants of original 
plants introduced into California from Europe in days of the Padres. 

Pergolas will support a variety of climbing plants brought from 
the old world during the early period, such as jasmine, bignonias, 
grapes, climbing roses, passion vines and solanums. 

Two sections of the garden will be devoted to native California 
cactus, ferns and allied plants. 

In portions of the garden devoted to plants there will be a tree, a 
shrub, and a perennial flowering plant secured from and represent- 
ing each Mission in this State, starting with San Diego on the south 
and ending on the north with Sonoma Mission, thus symbolizing the 
chain of twenty-one Missions in their geographic relation. Surround- 
ing the water pool in the bed of native California ferns, flat floor 
tiles secured from old Missions, will be inlaid on the parapet of the 
pool with the names of the Missions from which they came cut in the 
tile and letters filled with bronze metal. A bronze tablet will be 
erected at this pool inscribing the fact that the collection has been 
made to form a "Memory Garden" as, sad to relate, many of our 
Missions are now memories only. 

Outside of the pergolas will be planted oleander, pomegranate, 
Kuava, lemon, lime, crepe myrtle and orange trees, while along the 
pergola standards will be placed Mission grape vines raised from cut- 
tings secured from vines at Santa Clara Mission, which were grown 
from cuttings from the first grapes planted at that Mission. 

The Rose of Castile, an old fashioned moss rose, will have a promi- 
nent place in the Memory Garden. The Spanish people hold much 
sentiment for this rose and it is used medicinally. Cuttings of this 
rose came from San Jose Mission. Another old Spanish rose, known 
as "Seven" Sisters," so named because there are seven blooms in each 
cluster, was dug from the garden of the Mission at Monterey and 
donated to the city. 

The park will be entirely surrounded by pepper trees raised from 
seed gathered from the original trees planted at San Luis Rey Mission 
in San Diego County. 

A walk, lined on each side with Mission olive trees, extends from 
the Memory Garden to the music stand at the north of the park and 
forms an entrance avenue from the park to the Memory Garden. 
Benches under the pergolas provide ample seating accommodations 
for visitors to reflect on the garden, and there are also pleasant quar- 
ters in the park for picnic parties. The park, in some respects, is one 
utility as well as beauty. 

The Spanish Ambassador, who has signified a keen interest in the 
restoration of California Missions, stated that they are splendid mon- 
uments to commemorate Spain's early achievements in establishing 
the foundations of civilization in California. It is to be hoped that 
the awakening interest in preserving our Missions may obtain a 
strong foothold with the people of California, so that future genera- 
tions may know of the early accomplishment of the Padres of Spain. 




Im tii>»,i: T T- m^m^W^'^- **** 



THE PLAN OF THE MISSION MEMORY PARK AT SAN FERNANDO MISSION, LOS ANGELES, WHERE THE FLOWERS AND SHRUBS OF 
THE OLD CALIFORNIA MISSIONS WILL BE KEPT ALWAYS BLOOMING. ENGRAVING LOANED BY THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

OF LOS ANGELES. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 9 

EUROPEAN LANDSCAPE VERSUS CALIFORNIA medora clark 



WE live in an age of classification; science 
has divided and labelled most of our 
conduct, but up to date, perhaps I should say 



everywhere from landscape. The painter 
shivers when he sees it beginning to emerge, 
and moves on, for the hand of man is rarely 



gentle, and usually unswervingly egotistical. 
It has, even in this enchanting territory, 
evolved the ornamental with wonderous surety, 
but there is a spot — Pasadena has a feature 
— (I wrote 'future') almost untouched. I'm 
lauding the Arroyo Seco — and, I hope, be- 
tween the lines, pleading for its protection — 
for it seems to have been preserved for 
painters. They have begun to cling to its 
precipitous banks, and to spread out with a 
feeling of hopeful security. They perch on 
its edge and receive unconsciously that punch 
to which I have just referred. They sense 
the vastness of the place and feel the thrill 
of space, with the mountains a pulsing beauty 
all about them, and the untouched glory of the 
wild growth spreading out below. Spurred 
by their surroundings, they set up their easels, 
adjust their canvases, grasp their brushes, and 
set to work feverishly. In a word, the Arroyo 
Seco is one of the main ingredients in "back- 
ground." They arrive, they see, they want to 
stay, they buy and begin to build. 

And southern California lends itself gra- 
ciously to construction for the painter. He 
loves to design his shelters — studio, house or 
garage — with the thought of making it a 
pleasing part of the landscape. He enjoys 
studying the play of light and shade, the 




THE STUDIO OF JAMES SCRIPPS-BOOTH ON THE WEST BANK OF THE ARROYO, PASADENA. THE 
GREEN BANK ABOVE IS A MASS OF NATIVE CHAPARRAL AND THE OPEN ARROYO BED GIVES A 

SENSE OF SPACE AND FREEDOM. 



"as we go to press," to make sure, there has 
been no analysis of what constitutes inspira- 
tion for a painter. Inspiration as an abstract 
subject baffles because its composition is so 
varied, but I think I may place among its 
prominent ingredients, "background." Back- 
ground has an enormous influence on the 
painter. I don't mean the back-drop sort of 
background where the sheet conceals what is 
behind, but an unobtrusive consciousness of 
surrounding beauty, of tempered solidity, of 
"landscape poise." Briefly, he must get .•; 
punch from what's about without sensing the 
punch. 

That's why Europe has fed the painter. 
Spain is rampant with such spots, so is 
France; but both countries are barren of 
Mazda bulbs, jiffy heaters, open plumbing, 
sewers, floorplugs and gas at 22 V2. The 
painter is human; he doesn't in the least ob- 
ject to having the rough spots in life smoothed 
for him, and thrown in with a landscape which 
stirs. He accepts with pleasure modern con- 
veniences when they roll alongside continuous 
inspiration. He even succumbs to the lure 
of a tile tub, so long as he can see the moun- 
tains from the window just above it and cajole 
himself into the belief that he is laved by a 
mountain brook. 

Few cities of America can boast of such a 
compromise, for, thanks to the avid hand of 
the subdivider and the sightless gesture of the 
dumping committee, real estate has emerged 




THE STUDIO OF ALSON S. CLARK ON THE EAST BANK OF THE ARROYO IN PASADENA. NEARBY 
ARE THE STUDIOS OF MR. W. M. BUTLER AND MR. WALLACE DE WOLF OF PASADENA AND CHICAGO. 




ENTRANCE TO THE STUDIO OF ALSON S. CLARK, SITUATED ON THE EAST BANK OF THE ARROYO 
SECO, PASADENA. HERE A CHARMING GROUP OF HOUSES DESIGNED BY REGINALD JOHNSON IN 
COLLABORATION WITH THE ARTIST COMPOSE THE STUDIO HOME OF MR. AND MRS. ALSON CLARK 



masses of sunlight and shadow on his plaster 
walls and tiled roofs, and acheiving colorful 
splashes of bloom against his somber build- 
ings or about his doorways. He revels in the 
pattern cast by his swaying pepper trees. Na- 
ture co-operates with a twentieth-century effi- 
ciency, and he can actually create motifs on 
his own domain and play with light effects as 
though he regulated them from a switchboard, 
for the Big Light is always working. 

London's winter is an almost unbroken sea- 
son of rain; Paris runs her a close second, 
but in southern California the sunlight — if I 
don't watch my pen I'll be boasting about 
the climate and as a topic it has already been 
covered. 

A painter is an asset to a community. He 
may not be a great commercial activity, but 
indirectly he acts enormously for the good of 
the place, just the way rhubarb is good for the 
system, or snail-eating ducks for the garden. 
He is as good advertising as you can get, for 
his Missouri proofs of the beauty of the place, 
canvas of the hills, the trees, the beaches, the 
shore, the canons, all the variety and charm of 
the landscape — travel broadcast over the 
country, silent and powerful propaganda. He 
doesn't cost the Chamber of Commerce a cent, 
but incidentally he is one of their biggest 
folders — of course with frosts and floods left 
out. The possibilities and conclusion are ob- 
vious; so I don't need to use good South- 
land space to enumerate them. Vive l'Arroyo, 
may fate and the city dump deal kindly. 



10 



C A Lib OR A I A S () IT H LA X D 



RICHARD MILLER IN A CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



By M. URMY SEARES 



WHEN men who are 
known at home and 
abroad as accomplished and 
talented artists come to Cali- 
fornia's southland to live, to 
paint, and thus to make the 
country truly famous, a rec- 
ord of what they have done 
here is a vital document of 
existing conditions more po- 
tent, more convincing than 
anything presented by Pro- 
motion clubs or Chambers of 
Commerce bulletins. 

For a great painter is of 
all men the most unpreju- 
diced. He paints what he 
sees; and, if by virtue of his 
talent and training he is 
enabled to see more beauty 
than does the ordinary mor- 
tal, yet does the record which 
he makes contain that inde- 
finable, universal essence of 
beauty in nature which ap- 
peals to the emotions of the 
common herd though they be 
but dumb, driven cattle plod- 
ding through their ordinary 
lives. 

In a facetious editorial, 
holding up to us the critical 
mirror of American journal- 
ism, the New York Sunday 
Times is good enough to 
ilesignate California South- 
land as "that interesting 
magazine which judiciously 
plays up the landscape and 
architecture and soft-pedals the 
peachment that in the wide We 
opportunity and accomplishment 




A TYPICAL PAINTING UY RICHARD MILLER. ONE OK AMERICA'S MOST TALENTED 
DRAUGHTSMEN AND PAINTERS, WHO FOR MANY YEARS HAS TAUGHT AMERICANS 
IN PARIS TO PAINT IN THE MOST IMPROVED TECHNIQUE OF THE MODERN FRENCH- 
AMERICAN SCHOOL. THIS CANVAS WAS PAINTED IN THE GARDEN STUDIO OF MRS. 
ADELBERT FENYES. PASADENA. 

inhabitants." Not to deny the im- 
st we find much more of interest in 
than in introspection or morbid self- 



analysis, we would remind 
the writer in the great Amer- 
ican daily that architecture 
and building and engineering 
feats are the open records, 
more lasting and more vitally 
indicative of the character 
of a people, than is the ephi- 
meral printed page of the 
worn and weary writer of the 
daily grind of "news:" 

Shrewd as our writers of 
community advertising have 
become, they know how to 
appeal to tha eastern people 
who crowd our southern city's 
thoroughfares to the stop- 
ping of traffic and the con- 
gestion of all appliance in 
the necessities of life. What 
has been accomplished by 
loyal cooperation is the real 
record of the first generation 
of Americans in Los Angeles. 
That all sorts and conditions 
of men and women live here 
as in other communities, is 
better presented in our ap- 
preciation of the arts of life 
than in any other way. 

As to the landscape, Rich- 
ard Miller, coming from Giv- 
e: - ny, the Forest of Fontain- 
bleau and the Coast of Nor- 
mandy, said as he painted on 
the edge of our Arroyo Seco, 
"Give me but a little studio 
on the bank of this lovely- 
canyon, a porch on which to 
pose my model, a eucalyptus tree nearby and that blue hill for dis- 
tance and I should never want. No valley in France is more beau- 
tiful, no Eastern scene more ready to the painter's hand." 




DELIGHTED WITH THE FLICKERING SUNLIGHT OF THE LITTLE FORMAL MORNING CAI I " NOTABLE FOR THE HANDLING OF LIGHT THROUGH 

GARDEN NEAR MRS. FENYES' STUDIO, MR. MILLER PLACED HIS MODEL A MORNING UALU a dlCj iu» i ni n p .. „ T „„ 

THERE AND PAINTED A SERIES OF PICTURES WHICH DREW INSTANT THE SILKEN SCREEN OK A PARASOL AND NOW SOLD THROUGH THE 

ATTENTION IN NEW YORK AND CALIFORNIA. MACBETH GALLERIES, NEW YORK. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



11 



In the garden of Mrs. Adelbert 
Fenyes in Pasadena, Mr. Miller 
found a hospitable studio full of 
rich tapestries or simple, colorful 
textiles, oriental pieces; in the garden, 
formal walks or sylvan dells. His 
search for a model was longer than it 
might have been in Paris; but the 
interesting people of Hollywood have 
made life more full of interest for 
us all since he was here. The Art 
Students' League, which now oc- 
cupies the Stickney Memorial with 
its Richard Miller garden, has little 
difficulty in supplying the visiting 
artists or themselves with models. 

Mr. Miller did not advise the 
painter to settle down and stay here 
always. Art is long but it moves ever 
forward and unless new men come to 
us constantly we must go to them to 
study and to find appreciation for our 
art. 

Of this series, painted in Pasadena, 
Mr. Miller sent all but four or five 
to Macbeth in New York and did not 
even show them in Los Angeles where 
there was no place convenient at 
that time. 

But though few of his canvases re- 
main, his influence at a critical mo- 
ment in California's art was potent 
and widespread. His methods were 
the best for an interpretation of our 
dappling sunlight, his brilliant color 
and fine draughtsmanship a vital 
force in the work of local painters. 
Those paintings which he sent East 
are now hung in various collections, 
telling of California's lovely light and 
beauty and cheering those who can- 
not come. Those sketches and fin- 




MUCH DISCUSSION HAS BEEN AROUSED OVER THE DIFFICULT FEAT ACCOMPLISHED IN PAINTING 
THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE FORMAL POOL. THE DELIGHTFUL COLOR IN THIS PAINTING HAS MADE 
IT FAMOUS AND IT ADDS MATERIALLY TO THE FAME OF PASADENA. 




ished paintings which he left here are among our cherished 
treasures. 

As to the population in its finer aspects, let Richard Miller's 
serene and beautiful women, surrounded by the scintillating 
sunlight and their heritage of color from the ancient East, the 
Meditteranean and the Atlantic speak for us in California. 




LIMITED BY THE FORMALITY OF THE STUDIO GARDEN. MR. MILLER WANDERED 
THROUGH THE EXTENSIVE GROUNDS OF THE FENYES ESTATE AND FOUND A 
SYLVAN SPOT WITH A POOL. THIS PAINTING REMAINS IN CALIFORNIA IN THE 
POSSESSION OF MR. AND MRS. W. C. BAKER, PASADENA, CONSIDERED BY MANY 
CRITICS THE MOST CALIFORNIAN OF THE SERIES PAINTED IN PASADENA. 



JUST AS MR. MILLER WAS PACKING HIS SEASON'S PAINTINGS TO 
SHIP TO NEW YORK, A COLLECTOR OF NOTE WHO GOES TO EUROPE 
EVERY YEAR TO BUY OPJECTS OF ART, CAME TO THE STUDIO 

AND CARRIED OFF THIS PAINTING IN HER LIMOUSINE. 
THE PRINCESS OF THE LAND OF SUNSHINE, IN THE GALLERY OF 
MRS. ALLAN BALCH. LOS ANGELES. 



12 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




CALIFORNIA OFFERS ALL SORTS 
OF SUBJECTS FOR PRINT MAKERS 
AND PAINTERS 

The New Interest in Etching, By Arthur H. Miller 

California Etcher and Curator of the 
Cannell & Chaffin Print Rooms 




SCENES SUCH AS THIS IN THE RED ROCK CANYON ABOVE THE DESERT WHICH LIES NORTH OF OUR PROTECTING MOUNTAINS OFFER A CHALLENGE 
TO THE ETCHER AND REMIND ONE OF WHAT OUR AMERICAN PAINTERS OF THE HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL DID. 



THE perfection of the photo-engraving pro- 
cess, which for a time seemed likely to in- 
jure seriously the existence of etching and en- 
graving, by depriving the worker in these 
mediums of his livelihood, has ultimately suc- 
ceeded in raising the standard of etching, for 
only as "fine arts" can it now be successfully 
practised. The etched line was always a fav- 
orite means of expression with the Masters, 
since it's discovery by the craftsmen of the 
middle ages, but in the nineteenth century it 
fell into the hands of coypists who misused it 
by reproducing paintings, — works depending 
entirely on tone for their effect, — in this es- 
sentially line medium. 

When Whistler won his battle with the carp- 
ing critics who protested against his "unfin- 
ished" etchings, he taught the public eye to re- 
joice in untrammeled line, and definitely placed 
etching once more in its true position — the 
most personal of graphic arts. With its new 
recognition came a revival of interest in col- 
lecting. The strange taste of eighteenth cen- 



1 




tury England which preferred Hollar to Rem- 
brandt, is incomprehensible to us. We have 
learned again to follow with delight those open 
lines, sparsely but intuitively drawn, which 
Rembrandt saved for the very heart of such a 
plate as "The Death of the Virgin," without 
feeling a lack of finish. Nor would we demand 
that the "Hundred Guilder Print" be etched all 
over with that amazing network of lines which 
lends richness of tone to the quiet, neutral por- 
tions of this masterpiece of etching, where the 
rich blacks and somber masses of shadows are 
only used to carry the eye to the figure of 
Christ. Yet it can be said of this superbly 
drawn figure that it is only a sketch. 

Working only with black and white, Rem- 
brandt achieved a poignancy of expression in 
his finest plates rarely equalled in his painting. 
Whistler is remembered as an etcher, for it is 
on copper he drew those nervous lines which 
were the direct response of his sensitive soul 
to the beauty of the world in which he lived. 
Haden insisted that a good etching should be 




THE PICTURESQUE STREETS OF EUROPE MADE DELIGHTFUL INSPIRATION FOR ALSON CLARK, 
ETCHER AND PAINTER NOW IN PASADENA, CALIFORNIA. 



drawn upon the copper directly, at a single 
sitting. Certainly spontaneity is an essential 
etching quality, and Hammerton's blunt state- 
ment that a "cold etching is a bad one" con- 
demns many of those dull technical labours 
which cover large sheets of beautiful hand- 
made paper with carefully placed, uninterest- 
ing webs of dead lines. The first quality 
requisite to the making of an etcher is a "liv- 
ing" line. 

The growing interest in this art medium has 
produced a fine body of artists. D. Y. Cam- 
eron, Muirhead Bone, McBey, Lee Hankey, and 
the distinguished painter Augustus John, 
whose beautifully etched portraits disappear 
into collections almost as soon as they leave 
his press — these are at work in England. In 
France, Lepere, Brouet, Beaufrere are part of 
the revival of etching, which in that country 
has given birth to a new school of men who 
combine aquatint, soft-ground, sulphur-tint 
and other means of obtaining tonality with 
pure line drawing, in a manner perhaps de- 
rived from Goya. D. S. MacLaughlan, Arthur 
Heintzelman, Levy, Troy Kinney, Arthur B. 
Davies and others in this country make etch- 
ings which will live, and in California, thanks 
to the encouragement of associations like the 
Printmakers of California, the California So- 
ciety of Etchers, and the lively interest which 
a few dealers take in young etchers, there are 
those working with copper and acid whose 
prints win national recognition. 

The desire to own prints has ceased to be the 
special passion of the collector. People have 
discovered the lasting joy of owning a fine etch- 
ing. Prints have come out of the portfolio into 
the frame, because that personal quality which 
is the special virtue of good etching, achieves 
a tie between the person and his surroundings 
in a peculiarly satisfying manner. Between 
the impersonal wall and the mind of the inhab- 
itant, an etching can often be intermediary; 
for though on the wall as decoration, it can 
never be of the wall — its inception was too 
vital, the etching-needle lies too close to the 
impassioned fingers of the true etcher. He 
cannot disguise his true self; it will out upon 
the copper. Many an artist finds that while 
with charcoal he can make only a dull drawing, 
color will often lend the semblance of vivacity 
to a conception fundamentally unsound. This 
help is denied the etcher. So the keen-minded 
French say "On their good days, painters etch." 

Discriminating people are discovering that 
a fine print brings them into contact with vig- 
orous and original artists wh.>se work would 
otherwise be inaccessible to them. In many of 
our cities print-rooms are forming a new cul- 
tural nucleus. In Southern California, the 
growing desire to see and own etchings is re- 
flected in the presence among us of several new 
galleries in Los Angeles and Pasadena devoted 
entirely to this art. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



13 



A GAME PRESERVE FOR CALIFORNIA-£^^ 5S 



THE southern part of California has in the past been notable for 
its prodigal use of natural resources; but a new era is at hand 
when preservation of its woodlands and woodland creatures in the 
leafy retreats is being seriously considered. Rare plant life and 
precious waters, timbered tracts and mountain parks are to be the 
special care of the State and Nation. 

Usually it is necessary for individuals and groups such as the 
Sierra Club, Chamber of Commerce of Los Angeles and other power- 
ful metropolitan centers to call attention to the fact that laws are 
needed to safeguard our natural inheritance. An example of fructi- 
fying efforts by these organizations is afforded in the recent signing 
of the Congressional bill by President Harding, creating the Monu- 
ment of Palms and saving to the enjoyment of future generations the 
only remaining native palms, found in the canyons near Palm Springs, 
approximately one hundred miles from Los Angeles. 

This article will deal with the project to create a National Deer 
Preserve in the San Jacinto Mountains in the region touching the 
newly created Monument of Palms. H. R. 11581, introduced by Con- 
gressman Phil D. Swing, would set apart 26,000 acres of land ideally 
situated and suited to game-territory unfit for agriculture, timbering 
or other commercial uses. 

Stretching over the top of Mt. San Jacinto and down its eastern 
slope to the desert, the tract embraces altitudes of 2500 to 10,805 feet 
and provides ample winter and summer forage that fatten our deer 
for the hunt. Too high to permit grains to mature, the meadows of 
the upper reaches provide pasture nine months of the year for the 
black-tail and mule deer of the region, while the remaining months 
the herds are forced out by snows to the desert, where century plants, 




FIR AND PINE IN THE GAME PRESERVE AFFORD PROTECTION FOR GAME 
BUT ARE USELESS AS TIMBER. 

cholla and other spiney fare of the Colorado Desert prove even more 
palatable than the tender grasses. Three plant belts supply foods 
within this forty square miles of projected park; and there is a plen- 
tiful supply of water from springs and snow-cold streams. 

When this wholly unproductive area is converted into a sanctuary 
for deer, water will still be available for irrigation without depriving 
the "first families" of their drinking water in any season. It will be 
advantageous to future agriculturists who, in nearby areas, will plan 
to utilize the mountain waters now pouring wastefully down barren 
slopes. 

Dry desert wind the year 'round fans yellow pine and white firs 
cresting the inaccessible rock ledges and makes their timber pithy. 
Moreover, lumbermen would never find an easy road into these for- 
ests, conveniently secluded for game within the Cleveland National 
Forest. And the turning of this unprofitable area into really serv- 
iceable lands is a bit of shrewdness on the part of those framing 
the bill. 

Providing the measure passes in its present form, there will be no 
expense connected with acquiring the property. Half of the land, 
every other section, is owned by the Southern Pacific, which offers to 
trade its holdings for desert territory; and the other sections are 
already under federal control. The new preserve is to be administered 
by the Forestry Service under the Departmnt of Agriculture. State 
game laws will be rigidly enforced, restocking of game and planting- 
grouse will be undertaken by the State Game Commission. Experts 



THE DESERT 
By Anita Scott Lavagnino 

Lonely? Ah, no, that could never be — 

Only an infinite rest, 
Where the sentinel hills brood slumberously 

And there's peace in the quiet li est. 

What though my youth be past and gone! 

Never a weakling tear, 
For the twilight haze brings memories 

And God is my neighbor here. 




HIDDEN LAKE. A SCENIC GLADE IN THE PRESERVE, ELEVATION 9000 FEET. 

will be delegated to study the forage difficulties and diseases of the 
wild game of the region, and secure scientific breeding. 

Although the measure aims to preserve deer, it is also intended to 
increase other native game and birds within the bounds of the reserve, 
including native big-horn sheep, fox, squirrels, not to mention one 
hundred and fifty varieties of song birds. 

Recognizing the immediate need for such a preserve, the Los An- 
geles Chamber approved the bill in its present form and numerous 
commercial organizations in the counties of Orange, San Bernardino, 
San Diego, and Riverside have endorsed the measure. During the 
past season alone thirty bucks were killed in the region, a propor- 
tion too great for the resident herd not over one hundred and fifty in 
number. 

Threatening to forbid the capture of deer entirely, because of its 
scarcity, interested individuals and organizations yet wish to avert 
this ruling and provide for an increased supply of game for the hunt 
by prompt action. As is pointed out by one of the chief supporters of 
the measure, southland deer may become an economic factor, and 
under the methods prescribed by the government, Southern California 
may develop as valuable game precincts as did Alaska; in the north 
country within twenty-nine years reindeer were increased from 1280 
animals to 250,000. It is to California that sportsmen have turned for 
game with the continued shutting down of other deer quarries of the 
country and not to disappoint these sportsmen coming long distances, 
is the determination of supporters of the Deer Preserve. California 
has long been known for its hospitality and for its unlimited ability 
to satisfy a variety of wants along sport and amusement lines and its 
fame is not going to be dimmed as Land of the Chase. Nature lovers 
will be spared the ruthless destruction of these splendid creature since 
only in season will individuals be prey when wandering outside 
bounds of the reservation. 

With the passing of wild herds of buffalo from the plains of Colo- 
rado and other middle western sections, the United States lost one of 
its valuable meat and leather supplies and to prevent the repetition of 
such wastage of our deer is to be effected through the painstaking 
care and vision of residents of this Southland, many of whom as 
artists and lovers of the great outdoors have come to know the lonely, 
picturesque haunts of our untamed brothers, forever inaccessible to 
the passing motorist by reason of unscalable approaches on the east. 
Biologists and ornithologists are as eager as are hunstmen for the 
preservation of the beauty in these wildwood solitudes that belong 
as much to future residents as to us who are fast civilizing this 
Southland empire. 




SUNSET NEAR MOUNT SAN JACINTO. SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY, 

CALIFORNIA. 



14 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



SOUTHLAND 



Germany Over All of Us 

IT has been suggested by an American from Boston that 
if we do not approve of the way France is attempting to 
collect from Germany it might be more satisfactory for us 
to pay France and Belgium what is due them and then col- 
lect the sum from Germany ourselves. Perhaps America's 
kindhearted methods might create in German profiteers a 
higher sense of business honor; but the German whine 
that echoes through our daily papers makes us hesitate to 
put our flabby leaders to the test. 

Vive la France is the spontaneous cry that wells in the 
heart of every real American who has the patience and the 
brains to dig down through the twisted mass of words which 
comes to us from Europe and find a modicum of news. We 
have so many emigrants from Berlin's conquered Germany 
in our own communities that the papers think to please 
them by repeating German telegrams, forgetting, or not 
knowing, that America has always been a haven for those 
most dissatisfied at home. 

Knowing how the world dreads another war, Germany, 
whose trade is war and whose strength lies in the world's 
fear of it, now shows her skill in propaganda to convince 
Americans that if a war comes it will be the fault of France. 
This very camouflage should warn us of the probable pres- 
ence in Germany of arms and munitions for another war. 
One striking German characteristic which our boys learned 
to look out for in the trenches is the habit of accusing others 
of the things they intend to perpetrate themselves. They 
are so adept in the art of war, which they have developed 
into a perfect science and system, that they think only in 
terms of war and expect every one else to do the same. 
When, therefore, the allied armies learned their system and 
knew precisely what the German army would do and what 
the German war system expected them to do, they had only 
to do the opposite and the Germans were nonplussed. So 
precisely was the system carried out that our own individ- 
ualistic soldiers learned how to continue alive under its 
murderous fire. If the allied armies had conformed to the 
regular rules of warfare as compiled by the Germans they 
would have been annihilated by the perfect German ma- 
chine; and the German officers never understood why they 
were not. 

Can we expect a nation, trained for forty years to think 
war and breathe war, to change in a few years of armistice? 

By spiritual forces and by superior intelligence the world 
managed to stop this last invasion of the Goths and Vandals ; 
and now this unconquered people, war-steeped and impeni- 
tent, tries clumsily to use the weapons with which it was 
driven back within its own confines. This effort is indica- 
tive of another German characteristic with which we should 
be familiar if we would save the world from the supremacy 
of a warlike race. For they are adepts at copying the in- 
ventions of other nations and using them in warfare, eco- 
nomic or military. We have so many shrewd salesmen of 
that type in our own country that Germany and her meth- 
ods may be said to have won and germanized our methods 
of trade ; but so far removed from American thought is the 
murderous idea of military warfare that we do not realize 
the fact that Germany would rather make another war than 
pay her bills. 

True to form we now see Germany taking the art of ad- 
vertising and propaganda, invented in America to arouse 
our own people, and use it shrewdly to persuade Americans 
that Germany is being badly treated at the present time. 
Daily papers this country over headline dispatches and let- 
ters from Berlin with such sympathy and docility that a 
stranger to the geography of the situation might think New 
York and Los Angeles are German cities and Berlin the 
favorite city of America — so lovingly has Germany thrown 
herself into the arms of our senators. 

Realizing dimly that her trade of war is no longer hon- 
orable, Germany would have us think she has discarded it 
as a business and calls our attention to its threatened use 



in other localities. Striving to speak the language of the 
rest of the world so lately schooled in sacrifice and service, 
Germany asks of others for herself that which she should 
get down on her knees and grub for in order to give some 
small measure of reparation to a world she has insulted and 
condemned to untold suffering. 

So has she overreached herself in the eyes of a world 
grown wise enough to read between the lines of dispatches 
from Berlin and Coblenz; so has she added to the disgust 
which Republics feel for a nation unable to govern itself yet 
presuming to conquer the world. 

A Man's Speech to the "M. and M." 

THE Los Angeles Times, from which the following ex- 
cerpts are taken, reports the address given by Dr. Robert 
A. Millikan, of California Institute of Technology, before 
the Merchants' and Manufacturers' Association as "a re- 
vealing, straight-from-the-shculder address on the Euro- 
pean situation and its effect on industry and commerce." 
This Los Angeles daily has done a great service to its 
readers by printing this speech in full and we send it on to 
our readers for their study and cogitation in a condensed, 
but more permanent form. 

The Merchants' and Manufacturers' Association, meeting 
at a banquet at the Ambassador hotel on January 22, heard 
first the speech of its president, I. H. Rice, on the fight 
which the association has carried on for the continuation 
of the open shop in Los Angeles. Speaking of strikes and 
the deplorable Herrin massacre, Mr. Rice showed the terrible 
cost to fruit growers and farmers in California resulting 
from the railroad strikes and pointed out the benefits accru- 
ing to both employers and employees alike when the open 
shop is established in a community, and men are free to 
run their own business, whether as president of a corpora- 
tion or laborers by the hour. 

"But while we are satisfied that workers and employers 
alike are here enjoying the most wonderful industrial and 
economic conditions in America, we must not slump into 
the acceptance of these conditions as comparable to the 
God-given climate that is our heritage. The open shop is 
a principle that will live only if the principle in all its details 
is right. For its greatest success, the open shop depends 
upon every employer so conducting his industrial relations 
that the open shop is the most attractive place for any man 
to work. 

"It should be an axiom in industry that nothing is really 
settled until it is settled right and every employer may well 
accept at once the responsibility that is his to live and work 
for the open shop." 

In the main speech of the evening, Dr. Millikan gave a 
forceful and logical arraignment of warfare as such ; and 
analyzed the three great causes of war, the personal ambi- 
tion of rulers, the false idea that the past has proved war 
to be a natural phenomenon, and, third, ignorance and 
selfishness. "The towering personal ambitions of single 
individuals or of small groups of individuals has been slowly 
and now wellnigh completely eliminated by the aroused con- 
science of humanity. * * * "The last war saw four czars 
dethroned and the species has now taken its place forever 
with the dodo as a rapidly vanishing type. But what was 
the cause of that particular war? Not solely the vaulting 
personal ambition of a group of would-be world lords. It 
was a philosophy of life which is in no wise confined to 
Germany, which made the last war and which is threatening 
now to make still more war. 

% * * * * * * 

"The great war was in a very large part made by the 
Eduard Meyerses, the Smolletts, the Nietszches and the 
Bernardis of Germany who had convinced themselves that 
these armed clashes between nations are not only an in- 
eliminatable but on the whole a desirable agency in the 
development of the race. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



15 




"But mark you, that philosophy is not confined to Ger- 
many. Turn to 'The Crown of Wild Olives' and you will 
find one of the most inspiring writers of the English race 
speaking thus: T found (through the study of history) that 
all great nations learn their truth of word and strength of 
thought in war ; that we were nourished in war and wasted 
by peace. In a word, that we are born in war and expire in 
peace.' The plain teaching of John Ruskin in that passage 
is, war is neither eliminatable nor undesirable, and that 
philosophy is widely current in the United States today and 
presumably is represented in my audience tonight, but de- 
spite that fact I wish to brand it as a demonstrably false 
philosophy which must be eliminated by your thought and 
my thought, by your word and my word, by your act, and 
my act. If that philosophy is correct, then neither you nor 
I can point the finger of reproach or criticism at Germany 
for bringing on the great war when she did. 



"But no scientist today believes that we can predict the 
future solely by calling upon the lessons of the past, or that 
the law of the jungle must ever control in the affairs of 
intelligent men because it has controlled in by-gone days. 
Even the lessons of modern history, when rightly read, 
compel emphatic denial of such a point of view. 

"The elimination of this second cause of war in the United 
States is up to you and me and every thinking man who can 
exert an influence against the policy which will make us in 
a generation as much of a robber nation as Germany ever 
hoped to be. You may be interested to know that an English 
friend of mine who has traveled largely and is a critical 
observer has expressed it as his judgment that there is 
more of the war spirit abroad in the United States today 
than he can see in any country of Europe. It is one stimu- 
lated by a few unscrupulous demagogues, and it feeds upon 
the third cause of war about which I wish to speak, namely, 
ignorance. Try to put yourself into the position of a citizen 
of another nation which you are disposed to condemn, and 
I should like to present to you this evening and to analyze 
with you the other fellow's point of view in Germany, 
France and England." 

With consummate skill Dr. Millikan gave a clear view of 
disappointment, seen through the eyes of a young German, 
who called America to account for deserting Europe in its 
extremity. So, too, in France we are looked on as having 
failed to help solve the great and terrible problems of the 
war. 

* * * * * * * 

"The Englishman," continues Dr. Millikan, "thank God 
for him, has shouldered his burdens of appalling taxation 
such as you and I know nothing about, straightening his 
back, setting his jaws and saying, T do not want my de- 
scendants to ever say I did not pay my debts, and we are 
going to meet our obligations to the last cent whatever the 
United States may choose to do.' He regrets in the bottom 
of his soul our unwillingness to join him in trying to 
straighten out the present international muddle. He is 
extremely sorry that we did not go into the League of 
Nations, but Briton that he is, is keeping his mouth shut 
and sawing wood. 

"The elimination of ignorance, the last of my three causes 
of war, however, is one which is going to be brought about 
very slowly and by a long process of evolution and enlight- 
enment in which you and I and all the influences which con- 
tribute to the growth of the public opinion of democracy 
have a part. 

"The elimination of war through the banishment of the 
false philosophy which has engendered the war spirit, and 
the banishment of the ignorance and prejudice upon which 
it has fed, may be a long way off, but I am optimistic enough 
to think it is coming and that you and I are going to have 
some part in the ushering in of a new day of international 
relations." 



Not All Is Lost 

TO THE BOYS who came home and who are now sad- 
dened by the thought that the work they did over there 
has been made of no avail by our present desertion of 
Europe, the following paragraphs from John Buchan's 
History of the Great War let in the light that surely shines 
ahead. 

And so to those who hoped through dark days that dear 
ones shattered, broken by the crushing conflict might be 
spared to them, but who today are plunged into the deepest 
trial of their faith by loss greater far than had it come when 
all were keyed to sacrifice — may these last paragraphs of 
John Buchan's fine English prose embody what small mead 
of comfort lies in truth-transmitting words : 

"The gains and losses are not yet to be assessed, but 
there is ground for humble confidence that that sowing in 
unimaginable sacrifice and pain will yet quicken and bear 
fruit to the bettering of the world. The war was a vindi- 
cation of the essential greatness of our common nature, for 
victory was won less by genius in the few than by faithful- 
ness in the many. Every class had its share, and the plain 
man, born in these latter days of doubt and divided purpose, 
marched to heights of the heroic unsurpassed in simpler 
ages. In this revelation democracy found its final justifica- 
tion, and civilization its truest hope. Mankind may console 
itself in its hour of depression and failure, and steel itself 
to new labors with the knowledge that once it has been 
great. 

"The sacrifice was chiefly of innocence and youth, and in 
computing it there can be no distinction between friend and 
enemy. Hanc ex diverso sedem veniemus in uuait. That 
Country of the Young knows no frontiers of race or creed. 
Most men who fell died for honorable things, and perversi- 
ties of national policy were changed into the eternal sanc- 
tities — love of country and home, comradeship, loyalty to 
manly virtues, the indomitable questing of youth. Innocence 
does not perish in vain, against such a spirit the gates of 
death cannot prevail, and the endurance of their work is 
more certain than the coming of spring. The world is poor 
indeed without them, for they were the flower of their race, 
the straightest of limb, the keenest of brain, the most eager 
of spirit. 

"In such a mourning each man thinks first of his friends ; 
for each of us has seen his crowded circle become like the 
stalls at an unpopular play; each has suddenly found the 
world "of time strangely empty and eternity strangely 
thronged. Yet to look back upon the gallant procession of 
those who offered their all and had the gift accepted, is to 
know exultation as well as sorrow. The youth which died 
almost before it had gazed on the world, the poets with their 
songs unsung, the makers and the doers who left their tasks 
unfinished, found immortal achievement in their death. 
Their memory will abide so long as men are found to set 
honor before ease, and a nation lives not for its ledgers 
alone but for some purpose of virtue. They have become, 
in the fancy of Henry Vaughan, the shining spires of that 
City to which we travel." 

Perspective 

UNLESS we know well what is the "close up" in a man's 
perspective, we do not understand him no matter how 
he may explain. Unless we realize that it is our very near- 
ness to the earth that makes our night a dark one, we shall 
fail to grasp the universe of light extending out on every 
other side. "God is a Spirit" is the great answer to our 
epoch's questions. Nature's lavish sowing of seed until 
the earth is full of it — if earthly shell were the important 
part of life the waste would be inexplicable. 

"Not by Might nor by Power" says the legend over the 
stage in our beautiful new theater in Los Angeles ; and the 
context reads, "But by my Spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts." 



16 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



TOWN AND COUNTRY CLUB FUNCTIONS 

A HOUSE OF INFLUENCES — By ELLEN LEECH 



If you were the grandson of a sea captain, and grew up on waters 
of Lake Erie, and finally owned a staunch little boat of your own on 
the Pacific, wouldn't you consider it a particularly good piece of luck 
when the opportunity came to buy a real home for yourself which 
had been built by a retired sea captain? Only the best of it is that 
he wasn't retired when he built it, but worked over it during the 
three months out of the year that the ship was in dry dock, while 
the rest of time, as he sailed the seas he drew sketches, planned 
and lived through the days in his dream house. But knowing very 
well that houses of dreams are 
not material enough for this gen- 
eration, and he intended this to 
last for several, he took for bal- 
last on every voyage a load of 
sand, pounded rock and such other 
things as he judged best for the 
composition of plaster, — that we 
now call cement. On shore he 
experimented with this plaster, but 
the walls crumbled at both the 
first and second attempts and it 
was only with the third venture 
that he was successful. In this 
completely so, as the house stands 
after nearly fifty years as a silent 
witness to the good judgment of 
the ancient mariner, with walls 
eighteen inches thick and the 
strength of solid rock. 

The house, unlike those built by 
some men of the sea, bears no 
resemblance to a stranded ship, 
but the long lines of the roof are 
extremely pleasing and fit into the 
setting of huge pine trees and dis- 
tant low-lying hills as perfectly 
as an artist-architect could desire. 

While the lines are not of a ship, 
the wide verandah which runs 
around three sides of the house 
might be acclaimed a deck, and 
from the pitch of it would shed a 
heavy sea, though it is ever sun 
drenched rather than sea swept. 
Once inside the hospitable door, 
which opens at the first sound of 
the old brass knocker, the likeness 
is faintly reminiscent as here is 
the grand salon, with the dining 
hall beyond, and the staterooms 
opening cordially into this, the 
main heart of the house. 

Practically no changes have 
been made by the fortunate pres- 
ent owner except in one room, op- 
ening to the North, a lovely studio 

window has taken the place of a door, and here Claude Putnam has 
his easel and works out some of the pleasant things that delight his 
friends, as well as the eerie things, which have gained for him among 
his intimates, the title of "Put, the Nut." 

The custom of buying timber from old houses, churches, and even 
barns for use in the construction of new homes has steadily gained 
ground in the past few years, and the explanation offered has been 
that the aged timbers were so much better than anything procurable 
now. The real truth is that while it may be a wise thing to do, it is 
also an interesting thing to do, and the very men who would strongly 
deny such a motive, are just a little intrigued by the idea that some 
latent spell of enchantment may accompany the old logs into the new 
house. It is scarce likely that the business man of today would 
admit this but an artist is expected to harbor queer ideas, so it is no 
surprise to hear Claude Putnam admit his hope in buying the house 
was that certain influences might be felt 
emanating from the old walls. He 
holds every former owner and occupant 
of a house leaves an indellible trace of 
his personality, which, if true, means 
in this case no ordinary influences 
could be abroad in this house. The 
builder, the nice old man of the sea, 
was followed by a returned missionary 
from China, and he, in turn, by a 
miner. With this combination as an 
urge, things could not remain station- 
ary around that house, and possibly 
because of the lingering sway of the 
miner it seemed impossible to resist 
excavating and exploring the founda- 
tion, which is in reality the first floor 
of the house, as the house proper is 
reached by a flight of ten or more steps. 
In the Southern states, especially 
around New Orleans, many houses are 
built along these lines, the first or 
basement floor utilized in many ways, 




THE LONG LINES OF THE ROOF FIT INTO THE SETTING OF HUGE PINE 
TREES AND DISTANT LOW-LYING HILLS. 




Philip 
THE 



due to the size of the family and the manner in which they live. 

In this house, in San Fernando Valley, this first floor has developed 
along original lines and is a combination of studio, study, and "relief" 
room. In art the meaning of relief is given as "projection of a figure 
above the ground on which it is formed" and as it is a recognized 
fact that every artist must have some outlet for the fantastic dreams 
that haunt him, Mr. Putnam has provided here a retreat, where he 
may create some of the things intended, neither for the business nor 
the artistic world but merely for his own entertainment. Such a 

course is broadening, widens his 
outlook, and strengthens his ability 
to create, which is amply proven 
by the construction and decora- 
tions of this room. It is almost 
impossible to draw a vivid word 
picture of it because of no prece- 
dent from which to conjure descrip- 
tive phrases but visualize the din- 
ing hall of an ancient palace with 
the decorations of an Aztec temple. 
The great chimney at one end 
with its open oven, mutely sug- 
gestive of far away sacraficial 
days, furnishes a marvelous bed 
of coals for the grilling of steaks 
or chops and provides the motive 
for the dining hall, carried out by 
the addition of long, low tables of 
dark wood, with benches to match. 

The decorations should be Ori- 
ental, if the influence of the mis- 
sionary had been followed exactly, 
but through some means the art 
of the Aztec intervened and the 
four walls hold large murals of 
Aztec design, with several smaller 
ones and with germs of ideas for 
many more. These decorations 
are especially interesting because 
they are not merely put on to sup- 
ply local color but are correct in 
detail and are the result of re- 
search through innumerable vol- 
umes, and access to photographs 
of many temples and old palaces. 
There is the Aztec "Salome," 
weaving her spells then as now; 
the ancient and honorable "God of 
the Soil," inviting the young man 
to "return to the farm"; the "War- 
rior Princes," in full regalia; and 
probably the most interesting — 
"The Aztec Madonna,' 'indicating 
the worship of the mother of a 
divinity, the source of everlasting life. It is engaging to note that 
while the stencils on each heavy beamed rafter are Egyptian in 
character and follow lines always found in Egyptian art, they are 
copied directly from an Aztec design. 

Rugs of the hides of spotted cows break up the floor spaces, while 
all around the room on a wide shelf are objects of speculation from 
many ages and climes. Old pistols which may have armed the early 
pirates, dueling pistols of the days when honor could only shine forth 
resplendent in the day's dawning, and in close contact the skull of a 
bad hombre, who brought many a white man low until a sharp- 
shooter bored a frightfully big hole through the top of his head. 
In sharp contrast is a well carved pipe of peace, smoked by some 
more gentle spirit among the Indians. Here and there spots of color 
are thrown from a woven piece, and, as if to hark back to the old sea- 
faring gentleman, there is a walrus tooth brought down from the 

Alaskan regions, bearing in delicate 
carving the outline of the ship which 
hunted in the seas of the far north. 

It is in these surroundings that fortu- 
nate members of the Artist's Guild are 
asked to dine, and to discussions of art. 
proving "many artists, many opinions," 
when the affairs are of an informal na- 
ture, as nothing of the Aztec or the 
bizarre has crept into the house proper. 
Upstairs the setting is perfect, as a 
comfortable home of the present day, 
with enough mahogany to light the 
shadows, with its warm gleams, and 
with a young son to be tucked into 
bed at night, whose small confidences 
of the day are ended with the drowsy 
murmur from the shores of the Sand- 
man's Sea, "But, Daddy, I'm the Joy- 
boat Baby, arn't I?" After which, who 
will say there are no such things as 
influences? 



du Boi,. 

PLEASANT UPSTAIRS STUDIO OPENS FROM 
THE DINING ROOM. 



TOWN AND 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 17 

COUNTRY CLUB FUNCTIONS 




Philip Ju Bots 

THE FIRE IN THE GREAT CHIMNEY PLACE GLEAMS AND GLOWS AT ONE THE BACK WALL OF THE STUDIO-STUDY, SHOWING THE LOW DINING 

END OF THE AZTEC STUDIO. TABLES. WITH THEIR ACCOMPANYING BENCHES. 

A REAL COUNTRY CLUB IN SAN FERNANDO VALLEY 



There are clubs that have achieved a homelike atmosphere through 
the efforts of the architect and decorator but in the case of the 
Hollywood Country Club it was "bought and paid for" literally, as 
the present club house was built for W. F. Holt, as a residence, and 
later sold to the club by Mr. Holt, who is now the very active and 
enthusiastic president. 

Situated within a few miles of Hollywood and equally distant 
from Beverly Hills, the club forms a center and clearing house for 
the golfers of these two towns and for those of the San Fernando 
Valley who are not members of the recently opened Sunset Canyon 
Club. 

The club lies along the Ventura Boulevard and may be reached by 
either the Cahuenga Pass or the Laurel Canyon Highway, the beauty 
of the drives in either direction adding to the many points of attrac- 
tion the club has to offer. 

One unusual feature of the club is the large space assigned to the 
quarters for the ladies. All country clubs provide a lounge, dressing 
rooms and lockers for the women members but in this instance the 
space seems more generous than is usual; a lounge, with a delight- 
ful sun room opening from it, a card room, and a writing room. 
So cleverly are the color schemes chosen and the hangings arranged 
that the sunlight seems to have seeped into every portion of these 
feminine upstairs quarters. The card room is done in rose, with 
tracing of black, while the writing room — well, possibly it is rose and 
grey but the windows disclose such a view, such a panorama of 
exquisite beauty, that indoors fades into the knowledge that desks, 
chairs and writing materials are available but there is a doubt that 
any human being could write a letter in the face of it. It might 
be possible to do a prose poem, if you happened to be that kind of a 
person, but unless made of the clay which forms the fortunate beings 
who write because they can't help it, whose words bubble forth, 
rather than burble, any composition would be hopeless. Even the 
water hazard in the foreground, which adds to the sportiness of the 
course, also adds to the joy of the visitor, who only sits and dreams 
as he glimpses the blue jewel set in the jade of the turf. Just down 
the terrace in a quiet pool floats a fat and happy gold fish, he may 
be, probably is, lonesome, but he adds another bit of color to the 
landscape. 



It is possible that more space was given to the women's section 
than is customary in the hope that this may be a country club in a 
truer sense than in some clubs where the sole interest is golf. If the 
women throughout the valley find the club an interesting and enter- 
taining point of contact, find that it reduces the idea of loneliness 
occasionally associated with suburban life, it may prove an ally to 
the family who want to live in the country and yet have a lingering 
idea that they may be losing something in leaving the city which 
the hills cannot provide. 

Another pleasantly popular idea which is being carried out at this 
club is the provision of stables for the horses of members, and the 
supervision of the opening of trails and bridle paths throughout the 
hills and canyons along the edge of the valley. The skyline drive, 
which is to follow the ridge of the Santa Monica Mountains for 
eighteen miles, and to be known as Mulholland Skyline Drive, is just 
above the club. By means of these bridle paths and trails the mem- 
bers of the new Flintridge Riding and Hunt Club, of the Hollywood 
Sadie and Bridle Club, and the riders of Beverly Hills may plan meets, 
shows and hunts for all seasons. 

The Santa Barbara Riding and Trails Association has shown 
what concerted action can accomplish when a well organized body 
of enthusiastic men and women are working to one end. The result 
of their work in one year seems almost incredible, but if that organ- 
ization is responsible for practically eighteen miles of new bridle 
paths, and the opening of nearly fifty miles of old mountain trails, 
the various riding clubs of this immediate neighborhood, including 
Los Angeles, as well as Flintridge and the Beverly Hills clubs, may 
easily duplicate these results when they realize the desirability of 
having all the trails opened and a bridle path from Pasadena to 
Santa Monica including stopovers at Hollywood and Beverly. Such 
trails would provide week-end rides and add much to the interest 
through the introduction of new territory. 

The members of the Flintridge Riding and Hunt Club are con- 
stantly doing something new. A paper chase added to the interest 
during January. More than twenty riders enjoyed the excitement of 
the chase to which the imagination added the thrills of a hunt. 



18 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



RECENT BOOKS — REVIEWS 



The S'orthvard Course of Empire 

l ilhjamtir Stejansion 

f llarcourt. Brace ijf Co.) 



A collection of articles which have ap- 
peared from time to time in leading 
magazines. In them Stefansson seems 
slightly more impersonal — which is to be expected considering their 
nature — but every bit as interesting as he was in The Friendly 
Arctic. It is both a pleasure and convenience to have these articles 
dealing with the Arctic of today from several different angles under 
the one cover. They afford a splendid birds' eye view of the Arctic — 
its friendliness again, its future colonization, its industrial import- 
ance to the world and above all Stefansson's constructive attitude 
toward its problems. There are incidental bits of information, which 
stick in our minds — for instance one concerning the ostriches' stupid 
habit of hiding only its head, which it seems is utterly fallacious as 
the ostrich is a most canny bird, avoiding cleverly, its particular 
enemies. This fallacy, according to Stefansson, resembles many which 
exist at the present moment in chapters dealing with the Arctic in 
modern geographies taught in our public schools. There is a peculiar 
charm about Stefansson, who writes as scientist, poet, philosopher 
which makes the reader turn the pages in hopes of finding a like- 
ness of the man behind the lines. But it is significant that neither in 
this book nor in The Friendly Arctic is there any picture of the author 
— such is the genuine modesty of the true scientist. 

— E. Taylor Houghton. 

PUBLISHERS' NOTICES 

ALFRED A. KNOPF, PUBLISHER: The Opinions of Anatole 
France, Recorded by Paul Gsell. Translated from the French by 
Ernest Boyd. "Paul Gsell was one of the regular frequenters of 
Anatole France's weekly gatherings at the Villa Said and this book 
is a charming picture of the great French sage, of the library filled 
with rare and venerable tomes, of his works of art, and of the respon- 
sibility of the master himself. The themes upon which Anatole 
France embroiders are those which one would expect from the creator 
of Monsieur Bergert and Jerome Coignard; the tale of his adventures 
as an Academician; the eloquent apologia for skepticism; the divine 
art of writing for the theatre; his collaboration with Sarah Bernhart; 
his discussion of art with Rodin; the basis of patriotism; the Russian 
revolution; and finally the omnipotence of illusions." 

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY: The New Idealism by May Sin- 
clair, author of Mr. Waddington of Wyck, Mary Oliver, The Tree of 
Heaven, The Life and Death of Harriet Frean, etc. "In her preface 
the author attacks the position of realists with the words, "The old 
Idealism, the Idealism of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries of 
Berkeley, of Kant and Hegel, will have to go, and give place to an 
idealism which will take serious account of the world of space and 
time.' In her discussion of the theories of Bertrand Russell, Berg- 
son, Einstein and the lesser lights of philosophy she makes her points 
with keenness and humor and her contentions as to the primary and 
secondary consciousness and the ultimate consciousness that sustains 
the universe are cleverly and ably stated." 

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN COMPANY: The Cuckoo's Nest by 
Christine Jope Slade is a story of society and bohemian life in present 
day London. The lives of several idealists and materialists hopeless- 
ly entangled are straightened out ingeniously. 

Big Laurel by Frederick Orin Bartlett is a tale of romance and 
adventure in the Southern mountains by the author of "The Wall 
Street Girl," "The Triflers," etc. 

The Penitent by Edna Worthly Underwood is a historical novel of 
Russia of a hundred years ago. The chief figures are Alexander I, 
Tsar during the Napoleonic era, and Pushkin, the famous Russian 
poet. The novel is the first volume of a triology that will picture the 
crumbling of a great civilization beginning with the time of Napoleon 
and ending with the present day. 

DOUBLED AY, PAGE & COMPANY: Certain People of 
Importance, by Kathleen Norris, is a chronicle of individuals with 
all their pettiness, loves, passions and generosities, their joys and 
agonies. It represents a certain phase of American life. 

Marbacka, by Selma Lagerlof. "Selma Lagerlof is now engaged in 
writing her memoirs. The first volume which has just appeared in 
Sweden deals with her childhood. Its title is "Marbacka," the name 



of her father's home which she recovered and rebuilt as a harbor for 
her old age. This book, like her first one, "Gosta Berling," is a series 
of short stories strung together like beads on a common thread, but 
the style has changed from a restless vibrant staccato to a stately, 
measured rhythm." 

My Experiences in Scotland Yard, by Sir Basil Thomson, the 
chief of the British Secret Service from 1913 to 1921. "The responsi- 
bilities of Sir Basil Thomson, son of the late Archbishop of York, 
have been unprecedented. During his eight years of office, he directed 
the Secret Service through a World War, the Irish uprising of 1916 
and an extensive revolutionist movement. The story of his encounters 
with the outlaw world of criminals, anarchists and spies is none the 
less fascinating because it is actual fact." 



3L ®SE. Kolrinson Co. 

SEVENTH AND GRAND 

Whatever is new and interesting in travel, biography, fiction — 
literature in general — is procurable in the Book Section. First Floor 



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821 Chapman Bldg., Los Angeles 
Phone 11631 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



19 



CALIFORNIA 
HOMES AND 



THE GOOD SMALL HOUSE 

% SUMNER SPAULDING 

Chairman Small House Committee 
Los Angeles Architectural Club 

WHEN it dawns upon the public mind that 
it is possible to travel from one side of 
the city to the other without seeing one good 
small house, we can hope for an improvement 
in the appearance of the suburbs. 

This condition which has been brought about 
by the rapid growth of the city, is giving our 
outlying districts a character which is any- 
thing but beautiful, and will eventually bring 
much discredit to our community. There are 




GARDENING 
MANUAL 




FIRST FLOOR PLAN FOR CONCRETE HOUSE DESI GNED FOR LEONARD PULLIAM OF HOLLYWOOD. 
WEBEiER, STAUNTON AND SPAULDING. ARCHITECTS. 



many indications that the public mind is hop- 
ing and looking forward to a time when our 
small houses, no matter how inexpensive or 
small they may be, will have architectural 
merit. It is not an uncommon thing these days, 
for the person who is to build, to ask, "How 
may I spend my money in the most practical 
and artistic manner?" Many of the big or- 
ganizations who build great numbers of houses 
of this type to sell, realize the enhanced valu- 
ation of these houses, if some attempt has been 
made to give them architectural interest. 

Unfortunately architectural interest has 
been aroused by freakish roofs, loud colors, 
poor detail, and poorly proportioned openings, 
combined to make a design which will catch 
the eye. Numerous streets in Los Angeles, are 
lined with such houses, which give to the cas- 
ual observer somewhat the effect of having at- 
tended an exhibition of futurist paintings. As 
the futurist art is concieved by most people to 
be a side step from real art, so are these so- 
called "jazz" houses a side step from real Arch- 
itecture, nevertheless, by the very fact that 
these houses meet a ready sale, we are encour- 
aged, for it shows that the public is at least 
interested in the attempt to do something arch- 
itectural with a small house. The big problem 
for us today, therefore, is to find a plan for 
guiding the public taste in the right direction, 
by providing a means of education in the right 
way, and then to place at the disposal of these 
people a means of obtaining a plan for a home 
of good character. 

Many attempts have been made by various 
organizations to provide the home-builder of 
moderate means with plans which will bring- 
about this result; all have met with some suc- 
cess. The average home builder has always 
felt that he could not afford to go to an arch- 
itect, for the fee that an architect must have 




Sun kissed 

Ocean washed 
Mountain girded 
Island guarded 



SANTA BARBARA 

If you like California 
you will love Santa Barbara 

JOHN D. BURNHAM, Realtor 
1 2 State Street Phone 69 



^Atmosphere 



Furnishings from Barker Bros, enable 
a home to radiate that subtle charm 
which, for lack of a more expressive 
term, is called "atmosphere" — fur- 
nishings selected for distinction and 
unquestionable quality, and for their 
value in creating artistic home 
settings. 





Complete Furnishers of Successful 
Homes 



Pictorial 

Photographs 




of 



California Landscapes 

Hand Colored in Oil 



The KORIN 

KODAK AND ART SHOP 
522 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Opposite Pershing Square 





20 



CALIFORNIA SO U T II L A X D 



to design a house is more than he, the owner, 
can afford. The Architecural Club of Los An- 
geles is attempting to solve this problem and 
make it possible for the person building the 
small house, to have the advantage of the best 
architectural advice for the smallest possible 
fee. Thus the folowing scheme has been de- 
vised. 

A competition has been instituted among the 
members of the Club for a small house with liv- 
ing room, dining room, two bed rooms a bath 
and screen porch, to be built on a fifty foot lot. 
When the designs are submitted they are to be 
judged by competent architects, and those con- 
sidered worthy will have completed working 
plans and specifications made, and will be for 
sale by the Club. The number of plans sold 
from one design will be limited to ten, with the 
hope that ten houses of a kind will not be no- 
ticed in a city of this size. 

The competitors in this competition are em- 
ployed in offices of the best Arhcitects of Los 
Angeles, and the designs submitted will meet 
with the criticism and help of the ablest Archi- 
tects in our community. The cost per plan has 
not as yet been determined, but it will be so 
small that the average builder will feel able to 
pay it. Already the Club has received many 
applications and the scheme promises great 
success. 

The drawings of the successful competitors 
will be on exhibition at the Arhcitectural Club 
rooms on Santee Street and the selected plan 
will be published each month in California 
Southland. 

FEBRUARY PLANTINGS 

AMONG the annual flower seeds suitable 
for sewing outside in full sun this month 
are sweet alyssum, candytuft, centaurea, 
clarkia, cornflower, eschscholtzia, gypsophila, 
helichrysum, laptosyne, linaria, lupines, pop- 
pies, salpiglossis and Virginia stock. 

Others that will stand shade are godetia, 
mignonette and nemophila. 

Asters and zinnias, if wanted to bloom early, 
can be started in frame or greenhouse. If 
greenhouse has some heat, start seeds of 
ageratum, amaranthus, balsam, begonia, cel- 
osia dahlia, lobelia, petunia, salvia, tithonia 
and verbena. 

This is the best month for setting out decid- 
ious shrubs, fruit trees, grape vines, berry 
plants, rhubarb, asparagus and horse-radish. 
Pruning of deciduous fruit trees and vines 
should be finished this month. 

It is well to spray them with lime-sulphur 
after pruning and before they come out in 
blossom. 




A BIRD PARADISE 

<By THERESA HOMET PATTERSON 

¥ F there were a sign "Park your car here," 
I at the entrance of Griffith Park it would 
be to discover a Paradise never dreamed of by 
those who dash in and out of the park in a 

closed car. 

Given a sunny hillside with berries, a road- 
side tangle, a bank with weed seeds running 
down to a green meadow with marshy spots, 
— a willow-bordered river, and all at the foot 
of a mountain; and there will be concentrated 
there about all the birds found in that lati- 
tude, altitude and season. However, the 
weather this winter has been little guide as 
to when the birds should arrive or depart. 

Swinging into Griffith Park the hillside at the 
left is reddened with California holly, thanks 
to the enforced law which prevents the pick- 
ing of it. The eyes of twenty-five Audobons 
could not identify all the birds that animated 
that hillside one morning. The Linnets and 
Purple Finches (as if with an eye for match- 
ing colors) and all the other berry pickers 
were feasting there, including the exquisite 
Cedar Waxwings, Blue-jays, — who also act as 
policemen, letting no one slip up on them 
unawares! — and (again matching color) the 
robins. A Road-runner jogged along await- 
ing a challenge to show his jack rabbit speed. 

Below the road on a topmost spray was the 
Brown Thrasher, his tail taking the same 
downward curve as .his bill which made him 
look like a rainy day, while he sang like an 
Easter morning. There was a background of 
chattering Bush-tits, scolding Kinglets, and 
merry "chick-a-dee-dees" in the oaks and pep- 
pers. The Western Gnat-catcher in his blu- 
ish suit and the Audobon Warbler — that mite 
of perpetual motion touched up with yellow — 
were snapping up the insects. The Prince of 
the Flycatchers — the Phainopepla — sat atop a 
tree, irridescent and splendid, his red eye alert 
for game which gave him an excuse to spread 
that unsuspected white in his wings and turn 
a few somersaults in the air, returning with 
a "qut." Believing in balanced rations, he 
takes pepper berries with his meat. 

The Kildeers were crying and six or more 
rose at once from the marsh. Close by were 
the Meadowlarks, startled now and then by 
the shadow of a hawk. Redtailed, Sharp- 
shinned, Cooper and Sparrow Hawks sailed 
the air while the Towhees and Gamble-spar- 
rows (pals, they are) scratched for a living. 

A whirl of J uncos led around the bend where 
the "wake-up," "wake-up," "wake-up" from the 
sycamores identified the California Wood- 
peckers. The Red-shafted Flickers gobbled 
up ants wherever they could be found. When 
he called, "if-if-if-if-if-if" he may have been 
trying to give some reason why he hadn't a 
real song. A pair of red-breasted Nuthatches 
spiraled around the big trees, heads or tails 
down, it mattered not! 

It was all most interesting, but from the 
sightly path above the aviary the birds put on 
a colorful pageant. — Say Phoebe demonstrated 
what a crack shot she was. Five blue-birds 
posed in the reddest bush of holly. The 
pageant ended with a grand line-up on the 
telephone wire of all actors, Bluebirds, Linnets, 
and thirty-six Gold finches by actual count — 
all facing West as if to receive applause from 
their audience. 

Among the hundreds of birds, thirty-seven 
varieties were identified. No, not 57 — those 
are pickles and this is a preserve. 



HUNTING SCENES LIKE THIS WILL BE IMPOSSI- 
BLE IN THE FUTURE UNLESS SOUTHERN CALI- 
FORNIA PRESERVKS HER GAME IN SUCH NA- 
TIONALLY CONTROLLED AREAS AS SET FORTH 
BY MISS ROBINSON ON PAGE 13. 



The 

Gearharts 

ETCHINGS AND 
BLOCK PRINTS 

By Local and Foreign Printmakers 

611 South Fair Oaks Ave. 
Near California St. 
PASADENA 
Phone Colorado 4449 




An Ideal School for Young Women 

Cumnock g>cf)ool 

COLLEGE WORK IN THE FOLLOWING 
COURSES: 
Vocal Interpretation of Literature 
Literary Appreciation Story Telling 
Public Speaking Journalism 
Dramatics Short-Story 
Voice and Diction Dancing 
French Psychology 

Art and Art Appreciation 
An accredited High School and Junior School 
under same management 
HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
200 S. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles 

54720— Wilshire 79 



FRENCH and ITALIAN ARTS and CRAFTS 

Imported by 
MISS HOLLINGS WORTH BEACH 



Evening Bags. Old Silver, etc. 
Embroidered Linens 

630 E. Colorado Street 



Antiques 
Potteries 
Pasadena, Calif. 



HEWSON STUDIOS 

HANDWOVEN HOMESPUNS For 
Dresses, Skirts, Scarfs, Blankets and Bags 



602 E. Colorado St 



Pasadena 



The Stendahl Galleries 

AMBASSADOR HOTEL 

Los Angeles 

Paintings by the late 
A. B. Wenzell 
February 8 to February 1 8 

Recently Completed Paintings 
By Hanson Puthuff 
February I 8 to March 3 

Stendahl Galleries 

Vista del Arroyo, Pasadena 
Recently completed Paintings by 
Orrin White 
February 7 to February 2 1 



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CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



CHEER COLOR 



Is the name given by a colorist and designer of 
renown to articles of ladies' apparel and home 
decoration created in her studios in the Orient. 
Though made of their wonderful and well-nigh 
everlasting hand-woven textiles, and by their 
marvelous weavers, embroiderers and lace 
makers, there is no suggestion of the Orient 
in the beautiful Cheer Color Occidental de- 
signs and entrancing colors. 

New goods arriving weekly. 
You are cordially invited to visit 



CHEER COLOR 

409 South Western Avenue Los Angeles 




Miss Lenz 
Announces 
the New 
Location 
of 

Lenz 
Hat 
Studio 

at 

643-645 
East 
Colorado St. 
Pasadena, 
Cal. 
Phone 
Fair Oaks 
573 




Beautiful Garden Pieces 
in 

Sculptured Terra Cotta 
H 

Italian Terra Cotta Co. 

W. H. Robison 
1149 MISSION ROAD 
Opposite County Hospital 
Phone Lincoln 1057 Los Angeles 



Clark Vase No. 35 



A book of photographs, sketches, and plans of represent- 
ative California homes designed by your leading archi- 
tects. Price $1.00. Title— "California Homes." 

Address: Ellen Leech 
544 So. El Molino Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 




Broadway at Sixth 

offers a varied array of 

S c P%INg QOzATS 

permitting a wider field 
for the expression of in- 
dividuality, ranging 
from the dignified con- 
servative to the elabor- 
ated novelty effects. 



22 



C A L I F () R N I A S O I T II L A V D 



THE BLUE LANTERN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheon Afternoon Tea 

Dinner 
Distinctive Service 
Dinners and Luncheons Delivered 
and Special Orders Taken 
198 No. Los Robles, Pasadena, Cal., 
Phone Fair Oaks 1832 



REAL CALIFORNIA CANDIED FIGS 
A Delicious Confection 

1 lb. Box. Parcel Post Paid .... $ 1 .50 
4 lb. Box, Parcel Post Paid .... $5.00 
Samples Upon Request 

EL MOLINO CANNING CO. 

265 1 Nina St.. Pasadena. Cal. Col. 756 



PASADENA LEATHER GOODS CO. 

Suit Cases, Purses, Bags 
Puttees for Men, Women and Children 
Insured and Guaranteed Trunks 

742 E. Colorado St.. 
Fair Oaks 3 54 Pasadena 



PASADENA 

WINDOW SHADE 
SHOP 

Makers of Exclusive 
WINDOW SHADES 
The Best in Materials and 
Workmanship 
12 Holly Street. Fair Oaks 48 




THE PEACOCK 
Delicious Food — Daintily Served 
Luncheon — Afternoon Tea 
Dinner 

Dinner Every Night $ I 00 
Chicken Dinner Tuesdays and 
Thursdays $1.50 
SPECIAL DINNERS 
30 Garfield Ave.. Pasadena. Cal. 
Fair Oaks 179 



WICK 

HOWARD MOTOR CO. 

267 W. Colorado St. 

C. S. Brokaw, Res. Mgr. Col. 397 




HERBERT F. BROWN 

Stationery, Books 
And Picture Framing 



190 E. Colorado St.. Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 66 



MISS EDMISTON 
CHINA STUDIO 

Lessons in China Painting 
Gifts and Order Work a Specialty 
465 Herkimer St.. Pasadena, Calif. 
Phone Colo. 9687 



J he 

CATERERS AND 



v-^C< >NFI 



TXTIONERS 

prepare the most delectable cool, crisp salads and the 
daintiest, yet altogether the most satisfying of sandwiches. Of 
course, there are the frozen dainties together with the wonder- 
ful French pastries for which the Klite has long been famous. 
Those who prefer hot dinner dishes such as steaks, chops, 
chicken, roast turkey or duck and other meats or fish are served 
daily a la carte from 11 :30 a. m. to 1 1 :30 p. m. The Catering 
Department is prepared to serve at your home for all occa- 
sions on short notice any number of people. 

A box of chocolates and Bon lions 
or other candies of our own make 
can not fail to give satisfaction. 

629 to 641 SO. FLOWER ST., LOS ANGELES 
634 E. COLORADO ST., PASADENA 



RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN RADIO 

CONTRARY to the belief of many persons, why base their opinions 
on sensational articles appearing in the press and popular science 
and radio magazines, radio, insofar as it concerns the average 
person, has reached a stage of development that very closely ap- 
proaches standardization. The developments of the past year have 
been in minor details and I look for the same sort of development 
in the near future. Those who bought good receiving sets of stand- 
ard makes a year ago, have just as good sets as they could buy today, 
and by purchasing audio and radio frequency amplifiers and loud 
speakers (if not already owned) which can be connected to the 
sets they already own, they will have just as good sets as if they 
had waited till the present time to buy them. In the latter case 
they would have missed a whole year of good wholesome entertain- 
ment. I predict that there will be no change that will make those 
same sets out of date a year from now. 

The real improvements in radio for the past year were in better 
broadcasting stations and better programs. The development on 
tne Pacific Coast in that line has been greater than elsewhere. Late 
in 1922 KHJ, The Times, Los Angeles, closed their old fifty watt 
station, from which they had been sending out excellent programs, 
and opened up their new five hundred watt Class B station. 
Early in January, Hale Brothers in San Francisco opened a similar 
station, KPO, and on Saturday evening, January 27th, the new 
Class B station of Earl C. Anthony, Incorporated, was opened in 
Los Angeles. This latter station is a sort of a Radio Central, 
for not only are programs broadcasted from the station itself, but 
from the studios of the old stations of the Herald and Examiner con- 
nected with the central station by special input panels and telepone 
cables. Orchestra, organ recitals, grand operas, and other entertain- 
ments will also be broadcasted from this station, KFI, in the same 
manner from various theatres and halls in the city. If a prominent 
speaker addresses the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce or City- 
Club, for instance, you can turn on your receiver and listen to him. 
in the comfort of your own fireside and armchair. The vision that 
Edward Bellamy had and gave to the world in his "Looking Back- 
ward" many many years ago is now the commonplace fact of today. 
Though he thought it would be accomplished by the wire telephone. 
The actual accomplishment by the radiofone is much more wonderful, 
especially as the voice freed from the confinement of wires and 
cables is much clearer than over the telephone. 

PAUL FRANKLIN JOHNSON. 




The Radio 
Store... 

"Everything Worth 
Whils in Radio" 

Radio. Electric and 
Scientific Supplies 

Paul Franklin Johnson 

560-562 E. Colorado St. 
Pasadena, California 
Fair Oaks 3281 



Books . . . Toys 

Gulck Stationery Co. 

173 E. COLO. ST.. Pasadena 
Fair Oaks 39 

Picture Framing. Artist's Supplies 



Colonial Candies 

Chocolate Nuts, Fruits and "Chews" 
made by 

LUCILE KNIGHT 

1044 East Orange Grove Avenue 
Bungalow No. 2 — Phone Colo. 9812 
The Yarn Shop. 388 E. Colorado St. 
Mail Orders Promptly Filled 
Pasadena. California 



QUALITY SERVICE 

THE ELITE 

DRY CLEANERS AND DYERS 
Plant: 797 So. Fair Oaka Ave. 
Colo. 1349 Pasadena, Cal. 




Pasadena Gas Appliance Co. 

Our Expert Estimators 
Can Solve Your Heating Problem 
Exclusively a Gai Appliance Store 
We Carry 

THE CLARK JEWEL GAS RANGE 
91)1 East Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 93 



WHY NOT HAVE THE BEST? 

American Laundry Co. 
Fair Oaks 514 
501 South Raymond Ave. 



Permutit Soft Water Saves 
Clothes 
TROY LAUNDRY 

In Business for Twenty Years 
Pasadena. Cal. Phone C. 146 

Alhambra 243-J 



LAUNDERERS DRY CLEANERS 

Royal Laundry Co. 

461 So Raymond Colo. 67 

Pasadena, Calif. 



THE 

Eleanor Miller School 

Expression and Music 
PASADENA 

Send for Catalogue 
Phone F. O. 336 251 Oakland Aye. 



Phone, Colorado 5118 

H. O. CLARKE 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 



829 Earlham Street 



Pasadena, California 



i 820130 \i 
PHONES"] 822803 






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[CAMPBELL 


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823-824 LOEWS STATE BUILDING 

BROADWAY AT SEVENTH LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



23 



THE MONEY MARKET BSESE* 

THE skeleton of currency inflation, the economic member of the 
Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, is once again in the saddle 
of American thought. To date, fortunately, his course has been 
confined to the corn belt, but there is grave danger that his grizzly 
presence will be felt in the industrial and larger commercial centers 
of the country unless some heavy obstacles in way of very plain 
speaking from authoritative sources, such as the Treasury Depart- 
ment, the governors of the regional reserve banks, and others who 
can command the public ear, are laid down. 

Henry Ford and Thomas A. Edison, capitalizing the public 
confidence they enjoy by reason of their tremendous accomplish- 
ments in their specialized fields, more than anyone else have boosted 
this figure of inflated currency back into the saddle. Mr. Ford's 
proposal that the government issue new currency sufficient to pay for 
the "Mussel Shoals" plant and Edison's forcefully presented sugges- 
tion that warehouse receipts be made the basis for similar new issues, 
together with the farmers' readiness to believe that all of their ills 
are attributable to the inadequacy of our present money supply, 
joined with the proposals of certain equally cracked, self-styled econ- 
omists occupying seats in Congress, that Liberty bond issues of 
the country be legalized as security for issues of national bank cur- 
rency, are the supports for this rider of economic distortion. 

If the mere multiplication of money represented a corresponding 
multiplication of wealth, then any or all of the above proposals would 
work. But currency is not wealth. Wealth is made up of those 
things which we eat up and wear out in order to live. Currency, 
or money, is but the counting system which we use conveniently 
to sum up the real wealth of the country and expedite its distribu- 
tion. The wealth of the country is the wheat, wool, cotton, iron 
and copper ore, petroleum, etc., which combined with that other 
great element of wealth, labor, skilled and unskilled, produces the 
essentials and refinements of living. 

To say that money is wealth and therefore is possessed of any 
power of its own, is to say that the starving man on a desert island 
would find a million dollars of money more valuable than his last 
loaf of wheat bread. In such a situation the loaf of bread is all the 
wealth the man possesses, inasmuch as he cannot eat the million 
dollars, nor wear it, and its purchasing power for his purposes is 
limited entirely to the loaf of bread which he requires for a con- 
tinuance of his miserable life. 

Before the war a meal could be purchased in Germany for four 
marks. The same meal in Germany today costs twelve thousand 
marks. The answer is that the meal and not the marks is the wealth 
of the equation — the quantity of marks required to command the 
meal being only in proportion to the amount of currency existing 
in Germany pitted against the genuine wealth which they represent 
as units in a counting system. 

We in America tasted little of the bitterness of currency infla- 
tion as a result of the war. That little, however, should have been 
sufficiently bitter, as represented by the throes of liquidation through 
which we passed throughout 1920, to have convinced us all that 
there could be no reversion to such a state. For us now to increase 
our currency circulation without correspondingly increasing the true 
wealth of the country which that currency is supposed to represent, 
would be to have the farmer, who apparently looks to it as the par- 
ticular remedy for his ills, with two dollars of purchasing power 
available against his wheat supply where there was but one dollar 
before. Correspondingly, he would supposedly obtain twice the price 
in money for his wheat that he has been obtaining. This is appar- 
ently the only result he has in mind from currency inflation. But 
currency is not the price of his wheat. The price of his wheat is 
represented by the labor, farm machinery, clothing, transportation 
facilities, food, etc., which the currency he receives will purchase, 
and where these constituents of genuine wealth are not increased 
in quantity to meet the increase in currency, the farmer must pay 
for them double the price which he previously did, so that although he 
has received two dollars where he received but one previously, his 
two dollars actually have no greater purchasing power than the old 
dollar at which he grumbles so greatly today. 

In this vicious cycle of currency inflation loom up the strikes 
that would come when workmen, whose wages were not instantly 
raised to meet the new ratio co actual wealth, found their wages 
possessed of but half the purchasing power they previously had, and 
all the unsettling influences that increased prices for every form of 
service and commodity bring. 

If Mr. Ford and Mr. Edison wish practical solution for the 
farmers' problem, which is after all the manufacturers' problem, 
and the railroads' problem, and the laborers' problem, and the bank- 
ers' problem, then let them turn their eyes to disorganized Europe 
and remember, as America must always remember, that her basic 
prosperity lies in an assured and stabilized market abroad for the 
surplus of farm products which this country always has for sale. 
Until an economic stabilization of Europe has been obtained, and 
parenthetically it cannot be obtained until America plays a full 
grown man's part in attempting its accomplishment, the farmer of 
America will be cursed with an unmarketed surplus that will keep 
the price for his commodity low, and no trick manipulation of a 
counting system will afford him relief. 



A HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA — THE SPANISH PERIOD 

By Charles E. Chapman. Illustrated, $4.00 
An authoritative popular history, which presents a vast amount of new 
material, some portions of which have never appeared in print. 
At all bookstores or from 
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 
609 Mission St. S an Francisco, Cal. 



Financial Pirates! 



By promises of fabulous 
profits they persuade you to 
place money in highly specu- 
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you lose, they win. 

You will have more money 
in the end if you select a 
SAFE investment for your 
savings, although the percen- 
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Such a place of safe invest- 
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a Pasadena Bank. 



PASADENA CLEARING 
HOUSE ASSOCIATION 



Harmonizing Profit 
With Safety 



Large profits and strong security do not travel together. 
It is usually true that to make big gains one must take 
big risks ; and, conversely, to insure safety of principal 
one must be content with a moderate return on the in- 
vestment. 

However, it is frequently possible for one who keeps in 
close touch with financial matters to increase his income 
materially without in any way jeopardizing his principal. 

To assist investors in harmonizing profit with safety, and 
obtaining the most attractive returns consistent with 
strong security, is one of the important functions of our 
organization. 

Send for new booklet "Facts Important to Investors" 

Government, Municipal and Corporation Bonds 

314 Van Nuys Bldg., Los Angeles — Telephone Pico 787 

Santa Barbara San Francisco Pasadena 

1014 State Street 603 Cal. Commercial Union Bldg. 16 So. Raymond Ave. 
Telephone 494 315 Montgomery St. Fair Oaks 26 



24 



C J LI FOR N I A S (J I T H L A S I) 



GOWNS FOR EVERY GAIETY— AT BEDELL'S 





THE LURE OK BEADS IS EXPRESSED IN THE DECORATIONS OF THIS 
EXQUISITE GEORGETTE OVER GOLD CLOTH. A RICHLY BEADED GIRDLE 
IS ITS NEW FEATURE OF THE SEASON. FROM BEDELLS. 



DELIGHTFUL ARE THE NEW MATERIALS FOR CLOAKS AND CAPES. THIS 
ONE IS OF VELVA CREPE LINED WITH GEORGETTE CREPE. THE COLLAR 
IS BEIGE FOX. FROM BEDELLS. 



MOTORING FORTH IN SEARCH OF A HOMESITE 

THE FASHIONABLE QUARTER, FLINTRIDGE Elizabeth Whiting 



WITH the whole of California be- 
fore one the choice of a home 
becomes a fascinating occupation. 

From the great group of tourist 
hotels, parties motor forth each day 
in search of interesting territory or 
some new thrill. Subdivisions and 
town lots greet one on every hand 
and soon the lovely landscape will 
have disappeared from those portions 
of the country chosen for industrial 
purposes. It therefore behooves us 
to enter the hill country and leave 
commerce behind — the blessed hills 
of Hollywood, Verdugo and Flint- 
ridge. Flintridge, purchased some 
years ago by Ex-United States Sena- 
tor Frank P. Flint, has many advan- 
tages, not the least of which is the 
fact that foresight and acumen were 
used in planning its future and its 
ideals are those of the homelife of the 
country gentleman of the old south. 

Today it is the selected district, the 
distinctive residence community of 
suburban Los Angeles. Its Country 
Club became at once one of the South- 
land's social centers and the beautiful 
homes which are springing up on 
every side of its curving boulevards 
warn us to hasten and decide if 
Flintridge is to be our choice. 

Westward and northward the 
course of home building takes its 
way. Through La Canada Valley 
where artists hide their studios and 
flower farms bloom, one motors on, 
choosing here and there a building 
site. If a town among the hills is 
your chief aim and object you should 
investigate the most charming spot 
in Monte Vista Valley, Sunland town. 



WITH its central park of live 
oaks preserved, Sunland bids 
fair to be the most distinctive Cali- 
fornia town we have. Sloping fields 
all about give sites for little villas 
and olive trees and vineyards add 
beauty to environment. Industry 
is there in the form of olive factory 
and other fruit canning — and all that 
nature can do to make cool breezes 
down the canyon in summer and pro- 
tecting hills in winter combine to give 
the prize in climate to this handsome, 
thriving little California town. 

DOWN in the valley west and 
north of Los Angeles, where the 
aqueduct comes to the land it was 
built to water and supply, is a thriv- 
ing village — Owensmouth. 

Owensmouth is on the Southern Pa- 
cific railroad and the Pacific Electric, 
thus affording it ample transporta- 
tion. It has a $125,000 exceptionally 
well equipped high school, where not 
only the usual academic studies are 
taught, but manual training, agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

AN extract from the Van Nuys 
News : — ■ 

"Van Nuys is today the center of 
great real estate developments that 
are rapidly claiming the large ranches 
that have been devoted to farming 
and transforming them into small 
suburban homesites. 

On all sides, north, east, south and 
west of this city, subdivisions are be- 
ing opened, which are meeting with 
flintridge. the distinctive community OF suburban Los success and are locating in ( this com- 
angeles. residence of Alexander dry bou rough, escj. munity many new families." 




C A LI FO RN I A S () U T 11 LAND 25 

THE THIRD IN A SERIES OF LESSONS ON PROCESSES IN HANDICRAFT 

THE LURE OF BEADS— By edna gearhart 



THE bead may be a simple thing, to charm 
the heart of child or savage, but it has 
a tremendous economic and aesthetic import- 
ance in the history of races. The lure and 
the color of beads — shimmering piles and undu- 
lating ropes of seductive drops of rainbow in 
Venice' glowing plaza; the barbaric pomp of 
turquoise matrix and dusky wampum linked 
with virgin silver in Albuquerque's Indian 
stalls; mysterious ropes of amber and coral 
and strange exotic robes of bead net work in 
that enthralling room of Egyptian vanity and 
pride in the Metropolitan Museum of New 
York; a woven bead necklace of delicate de- 
sign slowly growing under persistent, plucky 
fingers of the big Wyoming cow puncher in 
the amputation ward of a base hospital in the 
Great War. 

It is probable that beads have always been 
in use ever since prehistoric man had his first 
naive inspiration to add to his own personal 
charm; and styles and dynasties may wax and 
wane, yet beads are always in demand. Prim- 
itive man used berries, beans, seeds and shells 
for beads. Later he made beads of shell and 
stone, ground and drilled by hand. 

Glass beads are supposed to have been first 
manufactured by the Phoenicians more than 
three thousand years B. C., and were used by 
them as barter. They are found in the ruins 
of Assyrian temples, as decorations of Egyp- 
tian mummies, and in the graves of ancient 
Greeks and Romans and Britains, and in the 
tombs of Herculaneum. These ancient glass 
beads were as varied and colorful as they are 
today, opaque and transparent. In the Egyp- 
tian tombs there have been found the most 
fascinating necklaces of beads made of amber, 
and coral, and turquoise and gold, strung in a 
variety of ways, in single strands and in a 
combination of strings in different sizes, shapes 
and colors. They were woven also into won- 
derful breastpieces that held together 1 the 
robes of bead network, worn by beautiful 
maidens. 

The manufacture of glass beads was intro- 
duced into modern Europe by the Italians, and 
Venice is still the principal center of the in- 
dustry. Glass beads were introduced among 
the American Indians practically with the 
discoverey of 1492. They were substituted for 
porcupine quills in an art of design and decora- 
tion that was already completely and beau- 
tifully developed. 



Some of Miss Gearhart's Charming Necklaces in bead 
work are being photographed and will be shown 
in a future number of California Southland 




CARVED BIRD RONE NECKLACE, EACH READ IN- 
CISED WITH DECORATIVE PATTERN. COURTESY 
OK THE SOUTHWEST MUSEUM, LOS ANGELES. 



There are three processes possible in bead 
work; stringing them; applying them to cloth 
or leather in embroidery; and weaving them, 
generally on simple looms, with threads form- 
ing a warp and weft. The Indians have used 
them not only as a personal ornament, but 
also most quaintly to beautify household uten- 
sils, and articles for ceremonial use. Wampum, 
the genuine bead, is beautiful and costly, made 
of clam shells or abalone, and drilled by hand. 

The study of the various designs and pat- 
terns used in the different tribes, is a fascinat- 
ing one to artist and craftsman. The motifs 
include geometrical designs, and interpreta- 
tion of flowers, plants, birds, and animals, 
having originally a religious meaning and 
symbolic significance, a sort of permanent 
prayer in effect, and yet executed for the pure 
joy of beautifying the articles of daily use. 

With little looms fashioned after the pattern 
of the simple Indian device, many sophisti- 
cated workers of today are engrossed as de- 
votedly as were the Indians in the weaving 
of beautiful necklaces to add the perfect touch 
of color and pattern to a smart costume. The 
process requires infinite patience, and the deft 
touch of skillful fingers. A carelessly made 
chain is a cheap, unlovely thing of no merit, 
but in the descriminating hands of a real 
craftsman, the woven bead necklace may grow 
into a rare mosaic of vibrating hues, and fine 
pattern, and graceful lines and spaces, a thing 
of intimate charm and rare aesthetic value. 

The motifs must be most carefully adapted 
to the limitations of the process, the actual 
number of beads and weft. From seven to 
fifteen beads, preferably uneven numbers, form 
the most effective widths. The search for ap- 
propriate motifs is an alluring one. Geometri- 
cal designs, bird forms and flower units are 
the best, in simple balanced arrangement, with 
little detail. The most charming bird forms 
can be found in the old Byzantine textiles, 
and Assyrian sources, and the early cross- 
stitch patterns of Italy and the Greek Islands. 
The geometrical designs of the Sioux, and the 
exquisite flower patterns of the Huichol In- 
dians of Mexico give delightful inspiration. 
Only crystal or opaque beads should be used, 
as the dyed and lined beads too soon lose their 
beauty. Although modest in price, and simple 
in technique, the weaving of beads is a fine 
and dignified craft worthy of development. 



SAN FERNANDO, THE BLESSED VALLEY 

By JAMES FARRA, Agricultural Department University of Kentucky 1909-1912 



SUNSHINE, fertile soil, ample pure water, 
the three essentials of prosperous agricul- 
ture bless the San Fernando Valley. Ranchmen 
of the valley do not waste their blessing. Their 
soil never rests nor does it need to. Intelli- 
gent tillage and crop rotation keep it in con- 
stant production. 

In the summer deciduous fruits, apricots, 
peaches, pears, plums and luscious vegetables 
of almost every known variety grow in great 
abundance. In the Autumn, walnuts, olives 
and beans mature to bring happiness to the 
valley and in the winter golden oranges, lem- 
ons, grapefruit, the humble cabbage and festive 
lettuce bring good fortune. 

There are in the valley about three thousand 
acres of apricots, the same of peaches and 
three hundred acres of pears. Of olives there 
are some fifteen hundred acres — giving to a 
part of the valley the name Sylmar or a sea 
of trees. Walnuts cover over six thousand 
acres, some yet young but growing with vigor 
and much promise of heavy production. It is 
between the rows of these young walnut trees 
that much of the winter lettuce and cabbage is 
grown. No rest for San Fernando soil. It 
produces bountifully and builds for the future 
at one and the same time. Beans and other 
paying summer crops follow the winter crops 
in their season, between the rows of trees. 
Fourteen thousand acres of oranges and five 
thousand acres of lemons and grapefruit help 
to keep the valley ever busy. 



Most of the products of the valley are pre- 
pared for market on the ranch, 'in the valley 
towns, or transported by motor truck to Los 
Angeles for direct distribution, but it seems a 
really splendid opportunity is neglected by 
these vigorous valley towns when they do not 
provide municipal public markets, a place to 
which the shopping motorist might go to buy 
direct from the actual grower, or his agent, 
the tempting products of the valley. 

Soils of the San Fernando Valley vary from 
a red granitic loam on the mesa through the 



various types of light sands and gravelly 
loams in the washes to a dark heavy loam in 
the floor of the valley. On the mesa, citrus 
fruits, oranges and lemons flourish, also the 
succulent avocado. In the sandy and gravelly 
soils grapes, olives and peaches do well; while 
in the heavy loams walnuts grow luxuriantly. 
Productive soils, all of them, when properly 
managed. 

Alfalfa makes eight or more tons to the acre, 
beets the same, beans a thousand pounds and if 
you ask any ex-service man, he'll tell you that 
is a lot of beans. Deciduous fruits make from 




AN INTIMATE VIEW OF THE HILL COUNTRY BACK OK LOS ANGELES. 
CALABASAS ROAD NEAR VAN NUYS. 



26 



CALIFORNIA SO IT II LA X D 



three to four tons to the acre, walnuts from a 
thousand to two thousand pounds, and grapes 
make enough for everyone to be happy, but 
that's another story. 

Water brought by wise men to quench the 
thirst of a parched pueblo has made a mighty 
city and the San Fernando Valley, a part of 
that city actually within its limits, has sprung 
like magic from a rugged cattle range to a 
productive garden spot, dotted with prosper- 
ous towns which reach out their hand to each 
other and the parent city. 

The city is creeping out into the valley to- 
ward the tons along each well beaten path. 
Through the Cahuenga Pass from Hollywood 
along the beautful Ventura Boulevard and up 
along the foothills where the new Mulholland 
road will run, the city is pressing forward. The 
full grown city will stretch its feet to the 
ocean, rest its head upon the mountains and 
lay its outstretched arms into two wondrous 
valleys, one of them the San Fernando, while 
within its mighty chest will throb the heart of 
commerce. 




i Ifffi 

'».'' ; ■ ■ ■ ■ 




ONE OK THE BUILDINGS OF THE HIGH SCHOOL AT SAN FERNANDO CITY, CALIFORNIA. 



SAN FERNANDO, THE FIRST TOWN IN THE VALLEY 



By BESS MUNN 



HISTORY has repeated itself at San Fernando, the first town of 
the San Fernando valley. 
The San Fernando mission brought the first activity to the rich 
valley whose desert like aspect hid realizations only now becoming 
manifest. That these realizations even in a small degree depended 
upon irrigation the mission fathers knew and the first steps toward 
irrigation of valley land was undertaken by a system of reservoirs 
and canals fed by the waters of cienegas near the mission. There, 




EVENING IN THE FERTILE FIELDS SAN FERNANDO VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 

on a miniature scale the replica of the great Los Angeles Acque- 
duct watered the gardens and groves of the mission for many years. 

At the time that Chas. Maclay, G. K. Porter and Ben Porter 
bought the De Celis holdings in the valley, in 1874 the mission 
system was extended and later taken over by the Porter Land and 
Water Company. It is further probable that an irrigation system 
in conjunction with the mission system was operative in Pacoima 
canyon as indications of canals and reservoirs have been found near 
the site of reservoirs built in the late 80's by the Maclay Rancho 
Water System which supplied the city of San Fernando from wells 
located in the canyon. During the past two years San Fernando 
has added a reservoir adjacent to the city which has a capacity of 
three million gallons. 

Following the introduction of a new concept of life which the 
fathers brought to the valley little change occurred until nearly a 
hundred years later when San Fernando was made the terminus of 
the Southern California line of the Southern Pacific. This brought 
another phase of life to the vast stretches of acres as yet lying 



You'll Never 
Tire of a Pool 
of Water 
Lilies. It will 
hold your in- 
terest from 
April to De- 
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Let us tell you how simple it is to have a water-garden. Our catalogue 
free from Dept. A on request. Better still, visit us and see for yourself. 

ALLEN'S WATER GARDENS 

Childs Ave. and Rowena St. 
1 Block South of Los Feliz Blvd. near Griffith Park, Los Angeles. Cal. 
The Only Aquatic Nursery on the Pacific Coast 
Mail Address, R. F. D. 5, Box 407 




uncultivated except about the mission. The San Fernando hotel 
built in 1875 when a stage line connected San Fernando and Caliente 
to the north has during the past month been razed to make way 
for a business block. This old frame building was the center of 
social life of the valley for years. Shortly after the arrival of 
Mr. Maclay and his family at San Fernando work on the Newhall 
tunnel by a crew of two thousand Chinese was undertaken. Work 
was carried on day and night and supplies for the hill side com- 
munity which existed on the wooded Newhall hills were secured 
from the stores and stations at San Fernando. 

During this same period the Cerro Gordo mining company with 
properties at Owens Lake freighted bullion to San Fernando where 
it was placed on cars which in turn took it to Wilmington where 
it was shipped by boat to northern smelters. Fifteen hundred mules 
and two hundred men made up the freighting service. These two 
developments gave San Fernando first place in the valley and it 
became a place of town lots and community development under the 
supervision of Mr. Maclay. A theological school established by 
Mr. Maclay north of the town site was later moved to Los Ange'es 
and the buildings taken over by another, secular college, now a 
prosperous institution increasing in size each year. City property 
sold for from six to twenty dollars a lot when the town was first 
laid out. Today the same property, part and parcel of a community 
of five thousand, is selling by the front foot. 

Not only has the valley known an earlier irrigation system but a 
street car system as well. In the early days of San Fernando a hotel 
built by G. K. Porter near the mission attracted many to the town 
and valley. A street car between the town and this hotel as well as 
between the town and the Maclay school gave the valley its first 
local transportation system. Horse cars of course they were. 

Since the first activity in 1874 San Fernando has held its place as 
the largest valley community. And within the past ten years since 
the water from the Los Angeles aqueduct has brought every sort of 
agricultural development it is taking the lead in distinctive under- 
takings. Freesia gardens under the direction of Alois Frey, who 
holds thirty acres for the culivation of brilliant, specially propagated 
freesias; the two-thousand acre olive grove of the Sylmar Packing 
Corporation; the rose gardens of Los Angeles florists; the nurseries 
of choice fruits and berries and shrubs, indicate the centralizing of 
new and prophetic industries at and about San Fernando. Citrus 
fruit, vegetable, melon, and dairy acreages in every direction from 
the city are interspersed with deciduous fruit orchards and the busi- 
ness development of the valley's first town reflects with accuracy 
the development of each section of the valley known as the market 
basket of Los Angeles. 



THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 

PRIVATE ESTATE 

Inquires the most thorough study of the 
many conditions involved. BE SURE 
you secure competent service. 



LANDSCAPE .\ ENGINEER .'. CONTRACTOR 
PASADENA 



THE CITY OF SAN FERNANDO, CALIFORNIA 



— The— 

City of San Fernando 



The HEART of the San Fernando valley. New 
development in any section of this great home and 
ranch territory of Southern California brings added 
activity to the Hub City. Investments in business 
or residence property are bringing from 50 to 200 
per cent. The city has doubled in size in three 
years. Through its pulse beats the Valley's growth. 

San Fernando City Property 

$450 to $500 

a lot. 

$50 down. Balance in $25 payments 



Buy at the Hub of the Valley 

SECURITY LAND AND INVESTMENT 
COMPANY 



Arthur G. Munn 



H. J. Poppelman 



ANGULO HAND MADE ROOFING TILE 

has given the touch of romance to the roofs of the fa- 
mous Spanish architecture of Santa Barbara. 

SOME EXAMPLES OF OUR ROOFING AND 

TERRACE TILE: 
The Lobera Theater 
Bernard Hoffman Residence 
St. Francis Hospital 

The Courtney and Haynes Residences of Montecito 
For Information and Estimates Address 

R. F. ANGULO TILE WORKS 

228 E. De la Guerra St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Plant No. 2, Box 91, Reseda, California 




J. H. Woodworth 
and Son 

DESIGNING 



-and- 



BUILDING 

Telephone Fair Oaks 218 

200 E. Colorado St. 
Pasadena, California 





Pacific*§outhwest 
Review 



By Fred W. Prince, Vice-President and Manager, 
San Fernando Branch, Pacific-Southwest Trust & 
Saving's Bank. 

COME AND SEE FOR YOURSELF! 

The City of San Fernando is situated in the northwestern corner 
of the San Fernando Valley. The San Fernando Valley is an "old- 
new" section of California, as far as agricultural and horticultural 
and living conditions are concerned. 

"Old" in that the first seeds of civilization were sown here when 
the Padres established the San Fernando Mission in 1797. "New" in 
that a little over six years ago the waters from the Owens River 
began pouring over the Cascades and into the San Fernando Reser- 
voir, and it has been but three years since the Irrigation System has 
been completed, whereby water has been brought to the highest point 
of every forty-acre block in the Valley. 

Since then the development has been remarkable. Thousands of 
acres have been subdivided; new towns have been started here and 
there; the old towns have taken on a new lease of life. Activity pre- 
vails everywhere. Opportunities and possibilities are unsurpassed. 
"Come and See for Yourself" 

i 4 *^ ! San Fernando Bram h- PAtiiic-Soi:TiiwESTX^?BANK( gfc 



ADVERTISEMENT 



The Two Thousand Acre 

SYLMAR OLIVE GROVE 

is located west of San Fernando in the San Fernando 
Valley. The Sylmar brand of olives, olive oil and figs 
has prestige. Insist. At all groceries. 



SYLMAR PACKING CORPORATION 

C. C. Moore, President. Frank Simonds, Manager 



THE BATCHELDER TILES 




We produce Tile for Fireplaces, Fountains, Pave- 
ments, Garden Pots— anything that is appropriately 
made from clay. :: :: :: :: :: 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



Chatsworth 

Croivn of the Valley 

GOOD SOIL 
GOOD WATER 



Owensmoutb 

The Educational, Religious, 
Social and Business Center 
of the rich upper Sun Fer- 
nando I alley. 



Lima beans, alfalfa, vegetables, 
deciduous and citrus fruits, 
live stock and poultry, with 
beauty of environment. 

Owensmouth Chamber of 
Commerce 




GOOD SCHOOLS 
GOOD HOMES 

A Charming Social Center 

Where the Hills 

and Valleys Meet 



Above — The School at Chatsworth. Beloiv — Aqueduct Reservoir, San 
Fernando Valley. 



Hunt the hills and \ alleys 
over, ^ ou will not find a 
hetter climate or a lovlier 
town. 

Sunland 

In the Monte Vista Valley, 
California 

All around are olive trees 
and vineyards and outdoor 
industries and sports. 

Address 

The Chamber of Commerce 
for further information 



TROPICO POTTERIES, In 

Glendale, California 
Manufacturers of 

CLAY PRODUCTS 

Architectural Terra Cotta 



Faience Tile — Red and Buff Quarry 
Tiles Flue Linings Salt Glazed Vit- 
rified Sswer Pipe — Chimney Pipe 




Van Nuys Has the FOUR Fundamentals 
for Farming 

SOIL WATER CLIMATE 
ROADS 

The World's Living is Gotten from the Ground — The San 
Fernando Valley, with VAN NUYS as its HUB and Center, 
has in Superabundance all these Four Fundamentals, Soil, 
Water, Climate, Roads. 

Address Chamber of Commerce, Van Nuys. 



.7 A 



Loyalty of Los Angeles' Citizenry 
£ has made their city the greatest on 
the Pacific Coast. It is making 
Southern California great and will make 
our nation able to meet any situation that 
may arise in world leadership. 

<//ie J^os ^Ingeles G/iamker of Qi 



om/tierce 




CALI 

SOUTHLAND 




THE 
SMALL HOUSE 
SERVICE 



EDUCATION IN 
CITY PLANNING 
BY 
RUSSELL 
V. N. BLACK 



OJAI, A TOWN 
WHICH DARES 
USE TREES 



ORANGE, A 
CITY WITH A 
PLAZA 



SPRING IN 

CARLE 
BLENNER'S 
PAINTINGS 



The Tost Office Tower 
Ojai, California 



No. 39 MARCH, 1923 20 Cents 

CALIFORNIA'S HOME AND GARDEN MAGAZINE 



C A L I F O R N I A S O I ' T II L A N I) 



THE MERCHANTS 
THAT YOU TRADE IN 



1 





9* 










THE PEACOCK 
Delicious Food — Daintily Served 
Luncheon — Afternoon Tea 
Dinner 

Dinner Every Night $1.00 
Chicken Dinner Tuesdays and 
Thursdays $1.50 
SPECIAL DINNERS 
30 Garfield Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 
Fair Oaks 179 



WICK 

HOWARD MOTOR CO. 

267 W. Colorado St. 

C. S. Brokaw. Res. Mgr. Col. 397 




HERBERT F. BROWN 
Stationery, Books 
ji^Pj And Picture Framing 

190 E. Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 66 



MISS EDMISTON 
CHINA STUDIO 

Lessons in China Painting 
Gifts and Order Work a Specialty 
465 Herkimer St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Phone Colo. 9687 



La Solano 

A quiet, ivell-appointcd small 
hold on the West Side near 
Orange Grove Avenue. 

Expert 
Service 

Grand Ave. and Lockhaven St. 



PASADENA LEATHER GOODS CO. 

Suit Cases, Purses, Bags 
Puttees for Men. Women and Children 
Insured and Guaranteed Trunks 
742 E. Colorado St., 
Fair Oaks 354 Pasadena 



PASADENA 

WINDOW SHADE 
SHOP 

Makers of Exclusive 
WINDOW SHADES 
The Best in Materials and 
Workmanship 
12 Holly Street Fair Oaks 48 



ftatblren Con&on 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Marcel and Permanent Waving 
Scientific Scalp and Face Treatment 
Shampooing Manicuring 

208 Central Building, N. Raymond Ave. 
Phone Fair Oaks 56 Pasadena, Cal. 



J he 

CATERERS AN 



I) ^CONFECTIONERS 



prepare the most delectable cool, crisp salads and the 
daintiest, yet altogether the most satisfying of sandwiches. Of 
course, there are the frozen dainties together with the wonder- 
ful French pastries for which the Elite lias long been famous. 
Those who prefer hot dinner dishes such as steaks, chops, 
chicken, roast turkey or duck and other meats or fish are served 
daily a la carte from 1 1 :30 a. m. to 1 1 :30 p. m. The Catering 
Department is prepared to serve at your home for all occa- 
sions on short notice any number of people. 

A box of chocolates and Bon Bons 
or other candies of our own make 
can not fail to give satisfaction. 

Phone: Pico 1573 
Fair Oaks 4053 



629 to 641 SO. FLOWER ST., LOS ANGELES. 
634 E. COLORADO ST., PASADENA. Phone: 




Renier AntlOO Keinuraiidt 

IN the GALLERIES of 
PAINTING and SCULPTURE 
Water Colors by Marion Kavanaugh Wachtel 
Recent Canvases by Hovsep Pushman 
Flowers and Portraits by Carle J. Blenner 
IN the PRINT ROOMS 
Prints by Californians. March 5 to 31 

Caniuli 6s Cftafftn, 3nc. 

720 WEST SEVENTH STREET, LOS ANGELES 




Pictorial 

Photographs 

of 

California Landscapes 

Hand Colored in Oil 



The KORIN 

KODAK AND ART SHOP 
522 S. Hill St.. Los Angeles. Cal. 

Opposite Pershing Square 



ASS'N REQUESTS 
PASADENA MONDAY 




Pasadena Gas Appliance Co. 

Our Expert Estimators 
Can Solve Your Heating Problem 
Exclusively a Gas Appliance Store 
We Carry 

THE CLARK JEWEL GAS RANGE 
901 East Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif, 
Fair Oaks 93 



WHY NOT HAVE THE BEST? 

American Laundry Co. 
Fair Oaks 514 
501 South Raymond Ave. 



Permutit Soft Water Saves 
Clothes 
TROY LAUNDRY 

In Business for Twenty Years 
Pasadena. Cal. Phone C. 146 

Alhambra 243 - J 



LAUNDERERS DRY CLEANERS 



Royal Laundry Co. 

461 So Raymond Colo. 67 

Pasadena, Calif. 



THE 

Eleanor Miller School 

Expression and Music 
PASADENA 

Send for Catalogue 
Phone F. O. 336 251 Oakland Aye. 



Q T"3 Studio' 

kerchiefs are 
"Innumerable of itftisi 
and splendid dyes 
As arc the liner-nmtirs 
deep-damask'd wings." 
527 California Terrace. Colo 



3655 



Books . . . Toys 

Gulck Stationery Co. 

173 E. COLO. ST., Pasadena 
Fair Oaks 39 

Picture Framing, Artist's Supplies 



Colonial Candies 

Chocolate Nuts, Fruits and "Chews" 
made by 

LUCILE KNIGHT 

1044 East Orange Grove Avenue 
Bungalow No. 2 — Phone Colo. 9812 
The Yarn Shop, 368 E. Colorado St. 
Mail Orders Promptly Filled 
Pasadena, California 



QUALITY SERVICE 

THE ELITE 

DRY CLEANERS AND DYERS 
Plant: 797 So. Fair Oaks Ave. 
Colo. 1349 Pasadena, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



3 



£11111111111 : i 11: i i i rum, i:n 1 1 itllllilllllll Illllllllllllllllllinillllllinig 

I SOUTHLAND \ 
I CALENDAR I 



Siiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiii mi in ti t mi i ii m is? 

Announcements of exhibitions, fetes, 
concerts, club entertainments, etc., for 
the calendar pages are free of charge and 
should be received in the office of Cali- 
fornia Southland, Pasadena, at least 
two weeks previous to date of issue. No 
corrections can be guaranteed if they are 
received later than that date. 

The public is warned that photog- 
raphers have no authority to arrange for 
sittings, free of charge or otherwise, for 
publication in Southland unless appoint- 
ments hare been made especially in writ- 
ing by the Editor. 



Clubs 

VALLEY HUNT CLUB: 
Sunday evening suppers will be served 
at 7 o'clock throughout the month, 
the programs are as follows : 
March 4th— Mrs. Hugh McFarland 
will give a piano recital including 
some of her own compositions. In the 
concerto she will be assisted by Mr. 
Claude Maitland Griffith. 
March 11th — Mrs. Henry S. Van Dyke 
will give a talk on "Some Gardens 
and a Few Interiors," illustrated by 
lantern slides. 

March 18th— Mr. Robert Morrison, 
tenor, will give an informal song 
recital, playing his own accompani- 
ments. 

March 25th- Mr. Frederick Warde will 
speak: "Fifty Years of Make-Believe." 
Thursday evening parties will be 
omitted during March. 
Monday afternoons, Bridge and Mah- 
Jongg: March 5th, March 12th, March 
19th, March 26th. 

Special feature for April : Circus 
and Dinner Dance in Costume, April 
6th at 8 o'clock. 

A NNANDALE GOLF CLUB: 

The afternoon bridge and tea parties, 
to which Mah Jongg has been added, 
will continue on Wednesday after- 
noons throughout the season. 
The second Friday of each month is 
open day at the club. 
Saturday evening, March 17, St. Pat- 
rick's Day, Dinner Dance. 
Thursday evening, March 22, Musicale. 
The usual Wednesday and Saturday 
Sweepstakes during March. 
The officers of the club, re-elected at a 
recent meeting of the board of direct- 
ors are : Robert M. Modisette, presi- 
dent : Charles G. Lathrop, first vice- 
president : Robert H. Finkbine. second 
vice-president ; Lloyd W. Brooke, sec- 
retary ; Henry F. Thayer, treasurer. 

PLINTRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB: 
" The dinner dance of the month will be 
given Saturday, March 3. 
Ladies' Day has been changed from 
Monday to the first Tuesday in every 
month. On every Ladies' Day the 
women golfers from the clubs in the 
Southern California Association will 
be welcome. 

T OS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB : 

Ladies Days, second Monday of each 
month. 

Music during dinner, followed by 
dancing, every Saturday evening 
during the month. 

Luncheon served from 11 :30 to 2 
p. m. on Saturdays. 

Sunday night concerts during month 
twice a month. 

Tea served as requested and tables 
for cards always available. 



N 



W 



ILSHIRE COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies' Days, third Monday of each 

month. 

Dancing every second and fourth 
Saturdays during the month. 
A musical is arranged for each Sun- 
day night in the month. 



]Y|IDW1CK COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies' Days, fourth Monday in each 
month. 

Tea and informal bridge every after- 
noon. 

Polo, Wednesday and Saturday of 
each week. 

Dancing every Saturday night in the 
month. 

T OS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB: 

Dinner dances, Tuesday and Friday 
nights of every week. Tuesday night 
informal ; Friday night semi-formal. 
Plunge open to the ladies Tuesday and 
Friday of every week. 

ONTECITO COUNTRY CLUB: 
Provides an 18 hole golf course, two 
concrete and two dirt courts for ten- 
nis, bowls and croquet. 
Tea is served and informal bridge 
parties arranged as desired. 
A buffet supper is served every Sun- 
day night. 




Interesting collection of very old English and 
Irish Silver and Jewelry 

on 'view and for sale at the 

CHEESEWRIGHT STUDIOS, Inc. 

Pasadena, California 




M 



L'/H ) v 

ml 



BULLOCKS 

Sportswear 
S t p f 



"One O'Clock Saturday" 



EWPORT HARBOR YACHT CLUB : 
Every member of the club is busy, pol- 
ishing, painting and generally clean- 
ing house in anticipation of Inspection 
and the big "Birthday Party" with 
which the season opens, May 19th. 
This party, with its huge cake and 
ever-increasing candles — now six — is 
always of intense interest to all the 
yachtsmen. 



Art 

THE Los Angeles Museum of History. 

Science and Art, Exposition Park, take* 
pleasure in announcing an important ex- 
hibition of contemporary French art, open- 
ing in the galleries of the Museum. March 
1, 1923. The collection has been exhibited 
in Tokyo, Japan, and San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, and embraces several hundred art 
objects, consisting of oil paintings, water 
colors, sculpture, porcelain and glass by 
the foremost artists of France. The Mu- 
seum is open free to visitors. Hours, 10 
to 4 daily, except Wednesday afternoon 
and Sunday forenoon. 

For the season of 1922-23 the Museum ha; 
assembled ten small exhibitions suitable for 
showing in high schools, libraries and 
women's clubs. These shows are composed 
of small paintings, etchings, block prints, 
Japanese prints and pictorial photographs. 
The pictures were obtained through the 
courtesy of the local artists and from the 
Museum's permanent collection. Detailed 
information may be obtained from Louise 
Upton, Assistant Art Curator. 
T^HE most important international exhi- 
bition of the year, that of the Print 
Makers opens March 1st at this gallery. 
THE Southwest Museum, Marmion Way 
and Avenue 46, Los Angeles, California, 
announces : 

Dr. Barton Warren Evermann, Director 
of Museum of Academy of Sciences, San 
Francisco, who will speak on the "Natural 
Resources of the Pacific," illustrating his 
talk with colored lantern slides and motion 
pictures. 

Prof. James G. Needham, Zoologist, for- 
merly of Cornell, now with Pomona Col- 
lege, will speak on the subject of "Monk- 
eys" — illustrated. 

Dr. Clinton G. Abbott, director, San 
Diego Museum of Natural History, will 
give an illustrated talk on "How Birds 
Show Their Feelings." 

To complete the month, our director. Dr. 
John Comstock, will speak on "The South- 
west Museum, Its Aims and Ideals" — illus- 
trated. 

Each of the above-mentioned programs 
will be preceded by a musical program. 

The Department of "Children's Activi- 
ties" also gives promise of being an ex- 
ceedingly interesting month, as we have 
appearing during the month the following 
well-known speakers : 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Zelenko have 
chosen for their subject "Adventures of 
My Doll." The talk is based on a study 
of personalities and customs of differenl 
countries illustrated with dolls in native 
costume. 

An entire program will be given by the 
Pearl Kellar School of Dancing and Dra- 
matic Art, in songs, dances and readings. 

Mrs. Florence Don Carlos, librarian of 
the Arroyo Seco Branch Library, through 
the courtesy of the Los Angeles Public 
Library, will give the condensed story of 
"Robin Hood" and other short stories. 

Miss Helen Pratt, representative of the 
California Audubon Society, Junior Divi- 
sion, will give an illustrated talk on "How 
to Get Acquainted With the Birds." 
TOURING February, ten of the painters 
of Southern California held an exhibi- 
tion of their works at the Artists' Co- 
operative Galleries in New York. The art- 
ists exhibiting were Alson S. Clark, John 
W. Cotton, Henri de Kruif, Jean Mann- 
heim, Hanson Puthuff, John Hubbard Rich. 
Jack Wilkinson Smith, Orrin White, Max 
Wieczorek, and Carl Oscar Borg of Santa 
Barbara. 

pRINTS by California etchers will be 
shown March 5th to 31st, Print Room 
of the Cannell and Chaffin Galleries. 
THE California Art Club has leased for a 
year temporary galleries at 1027 West 
Seventh street, Los Angeles, where the 
members will hold monthly exhibitions of 
varying character. The first exhibition 
opened February 15 and consists of typical 
California subjects, including landscape, 
desert, sea, street, and city subjects. 

The next exhibition will open Thursday, 
March 15, and will include portraits and 
figure paintings in oil, water colors, pas- 
tels, etchings, prints, and sculpture. 

Members are asked to note the last date 
for delivery of exhibits is Saturday, March 
10, and delivery may be made any day 
except Sunday between the hours of 1 and 
5 p. m. The jury will please notice that 
the meeting for this exhibition has been 
set for Monday, March 12 at 7 p. m. The 
galleries are open to visitors every day ex- 
cept Sunday between the hours of 1 and 
5 p. m. 

The officers of the California Art Club 
are Dana Bartlett, president ; Alson Clark, 
vice-president; Jack Wilkinson Smith, sec- 
ond vice-president ; John Coolidge, corre- 
sponding secretary ; Edouard A. Vysekal, 
recording secretary ; Ernest B. Smith, treas- 
urer, and Walter Farrington Moses, man- 
aging director. 

P GRAYSON SAYRES is having un- 
* usual success with his water colors in 
Eastern cities. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




Our New Wraps for Spring 



CD E VEAL a style 
JL\^variety of lovely 
modes almost beyond 
description^ for elpery 
occasion of the Season. 




BROADWAY COR. SIXTH 
LOS ANGELES 






t 

'•if 












-'V ii±/' ' i. 




FLINTRIDGE is today the 
scene of the greatest build- 
ing activity in its history. 

There is only one Flintridge — 
there is only just so much Flint- 
ridge. 

Those incomparable Flintridge 
homesites, overlooking moun- 
tains, fairway, parkland, lake and 
valley, will not be long available 
at present prices. 

Flintridge Sales Company 

727 Title Ins. Bldg., Los Angeles. 
Tel: 10601, Main 685 
Tract Office: Fair Oaks 212 




This Beautiful Home 

in Altadena, 1550 feet above sea level, above the 
winter fogs, where killing frosts are very rare, 
where the stars are undimmed by city lights, 
where the view on clear days extends from 100 
miles East to 105 miles West, and many miles of 
the shore-line .of the Pacific are clearly visible, 
where country life has all city conveniences with- 
out the crowds and noises, is for sale at a reason- 
able figure by the owner. 

PAUL F. JOHNSON 



560 East Colorado Street 



Pasadena, California 



Fair Oaks 3281 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



5 



THE second show of the Potboilers, Egan 
Little Theatre Building, opened Febru- 
ary 18 and will continue through March 
18. For the second show a new policy has 
been inaugurated — no exhibitor will show 
more than two pictures, and the exhibition 
will be divided into three groups, one con- 
taining works by the Independents, an- 
other, the works by advanced art students, 
and a third, canvases by painters well 
known in Los Angeles. 

A NNA HILLS of Laguna has an exhibi- 
tion at the Shakespeare Club House 
for March, and F. Carl Smith has opened 
a permanent exhibition of his excellent 
works at his studio, 217 Oakland Ave. 

A reception in honor of exhibiting artists 
was given by the Woman's Club of 
the University of Southern California, 
Friday, February 23, as the opening event 
of the annual art exhibition, sponsored by 
the organization. The reception was held 
in the parlors of the George Finley Bovard 
Administration Building, where the paint- 
ings and works of sculpture are exhibited. 
fTHE jury of awards for the sixth annual 
exhibition of the California Society of 
Miniature Painters, recently held at the 
Cannell and Chaffin galleries, were Miss 
Mary Harland, an honorary member : Mrs. 
Randall Hutchinson, head of the art com- 
mittee of the Friday Morning Club, and 
John Hubbard Rich, portrait painter. 

The first prize of $100 was offered by 
Mi's. Michael Francis Regan. The popular 
vote prize, an etching donated by the art- 
ist, Loren Barton, was awarded to Laura 
M. D .Mitchell for the miniature, "Open- 
ing Buds." The collective vote for a 
group of miniatures also went to Miss 
Mitchell. First honorable mention was 
given to Gertrude Little, second to Ella 
Shepard Bush. The following miniaturists 
were elected to membership: Anni Bal- 
daugh, Claire Shepard Shisler, Mary Cole- 
man Allen, Aurelia W. Reid, Helen B. 
Slutz and Marie-Marguerite Frechette. 
CUSIE M. B. DANDO is exhibiting her 
^ own water colors at the Venice High 
School, February 23 to March 23, and dur- 
ing the same period will exhibit works of 
her art classes in the Junior High School 
in the seventh, eighth and ninth grades, 
also the work of her High School class in 
art metal. 

TACK WILKINSON SMITH goes to La- 
" guna early in March on a sketching 
trip. He will use his new, fully equipped 
auto-studio in which he may live and work. 
THE exhibition of landscape and figure 
paintings by Los Angeles artists in 
Grauman's Metropolitan theatre continue 
to hold the interest of the crowds attend- 
ing the theatre. 

ESTHER M. CRAWFORD is again estab- 
*- i lished in her studio, 716 West Avenue 
66, Garvanza, after a year spent in the 
East. 

T\AVID ANTHONY TAUSZKY, while es- 
sentially a portrait painter, has been 
doing a number of sketches in the moun- 
tains around Pasadena. The views across 
the Arroyo from his studio on the roof of 
the Vista del Arroyo have taught him new 
values in ever changing colors. 
THE Cannell and Chaffin Galleries an- 
*- nounce the Annual Spring Exhibition of 
Water Colors by Marion Kavanagh Wach- 
tel will continue until March 15th. 
Throughout the year a permanent exhibi- 
tion of Mrs. Wachtel's work will be held. 

DANA BARTLETT has finished a series 
of over sixty illustrations in colors and 
black and white for a new book on South- 
ern California by the Rev. Dana W. Bart- 
lett. 

/^UTHBERT HOMAN, recently curator of 
^ the Cannell and Chaffin Galleries, has 
just been appointed Director of the Art 
Galleries of the San Diego Museum, effec- 
tive March 15th. 

J DUNCAN GLEASON, after spending 
• two years in New York City, has de- 
cided to make his home in Los Angeles 
and is building a new studio. 
mHE Cannell and Chaffin Galleries an- 
nounce an exhibition of Flower Paint- 
ings and Portraits by Carle J. Blenncr, 
March 5th to 26th. Eighteen canvases, in- 
cluding four painted in California of Cali- 
fornia flowers. 

MARCH 26 to April 9th. Recent can- 
vases by Hovsep Pushman. comprising 
part of the last exhibit in Paris and com- 
ing direct from there, will be exhibited in 
the Cannell and Chaffin Galleries. 

(1ARL OSCAR BORG of Santa Barbara is 
J holding an exhibition of paintings in 
the Stendahl galleries, the Ambassador, 
from February 8 to March 3. 

Avery pleasant incident of the exhi- 
bition of the more recent works of 
Orrin White at the Stendahl studios in 
the Vista del Arroyo, Pasadena, was the 
reception the artist tendered his friends 
Tuesday, February the 13th. 

Music 

THE dates and artists of the Philhar- 
monic Artist Courses, presented by L. 
E. Behymer during March are: Evenings. 
Tuesday, March 6, May Peterson. Metro- 
politan soprano; Tuesday, March 13. Caro- 
lina Lazzari, Metropolitan contralto : Tues- 
day, March 20, Alfred Cortot, pianist, and 
Tuesday, April 3, Edward Johnson, tenor : 
Saturday, March 10. Carolina Lazzari, con- 
tralto; Saturday, March 24, Jacques Thi- 
baud, violinist: Saturday, April 7, Guio- 
mar Novaes, pianist. 






Marshall 
Laird 



Specializing 

in the 
reproduction 
of the finer 

Spanish, 
Italian and 
English 
Antique 
Furniture 



WORK SHOP: 

416 East Ninth Street 



LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA 




TJOSA PONSELLE, Metropolitan Opera 
soprano, makes her Los Angeles de- 
but on May 7, under Fitzgerald Concert 
Direction, Merle Armitage, manager. 
THE Los Angeles Trio, May MacDonald 
Hope, pianist, Ilya Bronson. 'cellist and 
Calmon Lubovski, violinist, will give the 
fifth concert of the season on April 5, and 
the sixth on May 3, at the Ebell Audi- 
torium. 

rpHE Ellis Club of Los Angeles will ap- 

pear in concert April 25. 
THE University of Southern California 

Women's Club present the Tony Sarg 
Marionettes on March 9, and the Flonzaley 
Quartet, April 7, the Bovard Auditorium, 
THE Fitzgerald Concert Direction, Merle 

Armitage, Manager, announces the ap- 
pearance of Titta Ruffo, baritone, at the 
Philharmonic Auditorium, Friday evening, 
March 9. Ruffo has for the past ten years 
been a member of the Chicago Opera 
Company and the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany and will be assisted by two members 
of the latter organization. 
THE soloist appearing with the Philhar- 

monic Orchestra, Walter Henry Roth- 
well, conductor, at the next concert in 
Pasadena, March 15, is May Peterson, 
THE dates of the two special Sunday 

concerts of the Philharmonic Orchestra, 
Walter Henry Rothwell, conductor, during 
March are March 4, an all-Tschaikowsky 
program, soloist, Calmon Luboviski, vio- 
linist, and March 18, an all-American pro- 
gram, soloist, Estelle Heartt-Dreyfus, con- 
tralto. 

T OS ANGELES Oratorio Society, John 
Smallman, conductor, with two hun- 
dred voices, will give Quo Vadis, Sunday 
afternoon, March 11, 3 o'clock, Philhar- 
monic Auditorium. 

T OS ANGELES Chamber Music Society, 
will appear in concert, March 16 and 
March 30, at the Gamut Auditorium. 
THE dates of the Philharmonic Sym- 
phony concerts are: March 9, (after- 
noon) ; March 23, (evening). 
THE dates of the Philharmonic Orchestra 
"Pop" concerts are : March 4, March 
18 and March 21. 

Announcements 

THE Assistance League of Los Angeles 
announces the removal of their offices 
from the Coulter Building, Los Angeles, 
to a residence they have leased at 5604 
de Longpre Avenue, Hollywood, in which 
they will house the various lines of work 
in which they are interested, as the work 
progresses. The new telephone number is 
595-075. 

The League is giving a large Mah-Jongg 
party at the Hotel Maryland, Pasadena. 
March 14. 

THE calendar of the Community Players 
of Pasadena, in the Community Play- 
house, for the month is : 

March 5-10, "Wedding Bells," by Salis- 
bury Field. 

March 19-24, "Copperhead," by Augustus 
Thomas. 

THE Contemporary Club of Redlands is- 
sues the following calendar for March : 
Regular club meeting every Monday at 
2 :45. The president will hold office hours 
at the Club House, Thursday mornings, 
10 to 12. 

March 5, 2:45 p. m., "The Normal 
Child" ; speaker, A. Haven Smith, Educa- 
tion Committee. 

March 12, 1 p. m.. Club Conference 
Luncheon, featuring "Our Various Profes- 
sions." 

Evening Auxiliary, 8:15, musicale by 
courtesy of Miss Vera Van Loan. 

March 10, 2:45 p. m., "Real Life and 
Its Present Day Relationships" ; speaker. 
Dr. S. W. Cummings. Music by Mrs. G. 
Calder Bennett. 

March 26, 2 :45 p. m., "Theory and Dem- 
onstration of Handicrafts," in charge of 
The Arts and Crafts Guild. 



6 CALIFORNIA $ O V T H L A V /) 



HELEN DEUSNER 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT 
573 South Lake Avenue 
Pasadena, California 
F. O. 6321 Telephones F. O. 29ln 

Mrs. Deusner offers to the 
owners of small places, or to 
those uncertain how to proceed, 
an Introductory Interview of 
about two hours when advice 
will be freely given, and esti- 
mates furnished if further work 
be required. 

The charge for this service 
would be ten dollars in or near 
Pasadena, Los Angeles, or 
Santa Barbara. 



Certified 
Milk 



Particular Milk 
For Particular People 

Arden Dairy Farms 

have produced this high quality 
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for sixteen years. 

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NEVER A 
BETTER TIME 

To Visit One of America's 
Most Famous Mountains 

M 1 LOWE 

Delightful At All Seasons 
Is Just Now Garbing 
Itself For Spring 



The Pleasant Odor of Woods, 
The Clear, Distinct Vista, 
The Pleasant, Winding Trails 
Insures a Glorious Outing. 



Round Trip from 
Los Angeles $2.50 

PA C I F I C 
ELECTRIC 
RAILWAY 

O. A. Smith 
Passenger Traffic Manager 
Los Angeles 



California 


Southland 


M. Urmy Seares 
Ellen Leech - 


Editor and Publisher 
- Assistant Editor 


No. 39 


MARCH, 1923 






CONTENTS 



PAGE 

The Post Office Tower, Ojai, California Cover Design 

Mead and Retina, Architect*. 

Overmantel, By Carle Blenner Contents Design 

P^ducation in City Planning Russell Van Nest Black 7 

Trees in City Planning, Ojai James Farra 9 

A Notable Portrait, By Howard R. Butler 10 

Santa Barbara's Community /Irts Edward Sajons 10 

The Art Galleries of San Diegj Cuthbert Homan 11 

The Work of Carle J. Bi.knner M. Urmy Seares 12 

Southland Opinion 14-15 

Irene Castle in Los Angeles Ellen Leech 16 

A Bit of Boston in California 1H 

Spring Styles 19 

Olij Irish Silver for California Collectors 19 

Pasadena and Her Observatory 20 

Some Spring Flowering Trees Helen Deusner 21 

The Birds and the Desert Theresa H. Patterson 22 

Architectural Models Elizabeth Stines 24 

The Small House Service 25 

Walnut Gathering (Verse) Gertrude W. Hoffman 26 

Flintridge, the Well-planned Suburb 26 

Orange, a Town with a Plaza V. D. Johnson 26 

Told on the Trolley 27 

CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND is published monthly at Pasadena, Cal. 

One dollar and twenty cents for six issues, two dollars for twelve 
For extra copies or back numbers call Main 4084, L. A. News Co. 

Copyrighted. 11123. by M. Urmv Seares 
Entered as second class matter, July 28, 1919, at the Post Office at PasadeDa, 
California, under Act of March 3. 1879. 

ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT AND RATES 
For Pasudentt advertising call Colorado 70!>5 
For Los Angeles advertising tall 8 SO ISO 
or address California Southland, Advertising Manager, 
Pasadena, California . 




The Radio 
Store... 

"Everything Worth 
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Radio, Electric and 
Scientific Supplies 

Paul Franklin Johnson 

560-562 E. Colorado St. 
Pasadena, California 
Fair Oaks 3281 



History of California 
The American Period 

By Robert C. Cleland 

Is ready and completes our 
history of the state. The first 
volume is 

History of California 
The Spanish Period 

By Charles E. Chapman 
Price $4.00 each 

THE MACMILLAN CO. 
Publishers, San Francisco 



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308 East Colorado Street 

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references. Santa Monica Bay di trict pre- 
ferred liox 2. California Southland, 
Pasadena. 



Public Sal 



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CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF NATIONAL INTEREST 



THE SUCCESS OF CITY PLANNING THROUGH EDUCATION 

By RUSSELL VAN NEST BLACK — Toian Planner 



TWENTY years ago, City Planning was too little known to be 
called a profession. A few men were giving special thought to 
the building of cities. Baron Hausman had replanned Paris; L'en- 
fant had laid his farsighted foundation for our capitol city, Wash- 
ington; and Burnham was dreaming his dreams for Chicago. But, 
except in relation to monumental city building, City Planning was 
little known. It is only during the last decade that it has developed 
into a well defined science. 

Because it is so new and so almost unheard of by the great major- 
ity of even so enlightened a country as our United States, the 
first and greatest task confronting any group of men or women, 
seeking the benefits of orderly planning for their city, is the educa- 
tion of their fellow voters. 

The full success of every large city planning effort depends upon 
the support of the electorate. Private capital can buy a plan for 
a city but it cannot make the plan a living thing. The people of 
a city must know and observe its plan before the plan can become an 
actuality. City planning legislation is futile unless it is observed 
in spirit. Laws are not laws until they are recognized as such by 
the majority of people affected by them. Frequently, municipal im- 
provement bonds must be approved at the poles. City administra- 
tions are always more or less directly responible to the people and 



do not, in themselves, have any great city planning powers. No con- 
siderable city planning movement therefore can advance very far in 
the face of the opposition of the electorate and the voter is usually 
opposed to any issue he does not understand. The only safe foun- 
dation for a city plan is an enlightened citizenry. 

It should not be a difficult matter to convince any reasoning per- 
son of the merits of such a common-sense, economically sound prop- 
osition as the orderly planning and building of cities, nor is it. The 
real difficulty lies in gaining his interested attention. 

The average city dweller takes his surroundings for granted. To 
him, the building of his canyon streets is as remote as the creation 
of the mountains. He thinks of urban expansion as a natural phen- 
omenon beyond the control of man. The city, as a living, growing, 
human creation is not one of the conscious realities of his existence. 
His only concern is the workshop or office, the sheltering roof, and 
the particular corner of the city wherein he seeks his recreation. 
The average city dweller has largely lost his sense of construction 
and simultaneously he has lost his interest in questions of construc- 
tion. If he is to be acquainted with the principles of city planning, 
these principles must be taken to him and adequately spread before 
him. He will not seek them out. 

For the purpose of this discussion, we will classify city dwellers 




THE HEART OF CALIFORNIA- THE STATE CAPITOL AT SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA, CONSTRUCTED OK CALIFORNIA GRANITE AND HARD BURNED 
BRICK IT IS ONE OF THE BEST CONSTRUCTED AND MOST BEAUTIFUL CAPITOLS IN THE COUNTRY. IT WAS BEGUN IN 1860 FROM PLANS BY F ,M. 
BUTLER AND IS NOW BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED WITH MURALS BY ARTHUR MATHEWS, NOTED CALIFORNIA PAINTER. ITS CORRIDORS ARE OF 
CALIFORNIA MARBLE ITS FLOORS OF INLAID TILE. IT IS SURROUNDED BY A BOTANICAL GARDEN OF OVER THIRTY ACRES. 



8 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



as voters of today and voters of tomorrow, — grownups and children. 
The adult mind is seldom plastic. It develops new points of view 
with difficulty, and rarely finds it possblie to acquire the full com- 
munity spirit necessary to a complete comprehension of the funda- 
mentals of city planning. It is probable that the best we can hope 
from the present generation of voters is that it will sanction the prep- 
aration of plans and will observe them to the extent of safeguarding 
the larger interests of the future city. For the more aggressive 
application of our plans it will be necessary to look to the efforts of 
future generations. 

It is necessary then that planning education be directed toward 
two general objectives; the persuasion of the present generation of 
voters through the public press, the lecture, the moving picture, and 
all other legitimate publicity mediums; and the other, the education of 
the children in school through courses in city planning and citizen- 
ship. 

In the education of the adult, the public press is probably the 
most powerful medium and its full and enthusiastic support is much 
to be desired. At least one front page column of each local news- 
paper, including those printed in foreign languages, should be given 
over regularly once or twice a week to the question of local planning. 
Small items concerning the planning efforts of other cities should be 
used frequently. Quotations from various planning authorities might 
be used occasionally, and all of these should be so managed that, by 
placing city planning persistently before the reader his curiosity 
and finally his interest is aroused and he comes to give the question 
serious thought or gradually to take it for granted. All of this 
publicity should be in the hands of some person not only proficient in 
newspaper writing but well grounded in the fundamental principles 
of city planning. Ordinarily, the regular reporting staff of a news- 
paper cannot be depended upon to conduct city planning publicity 
with any degree of satisfaction. 

Systematic talking, preferably illustrated, before the various civic 
organizations and other groups of citizens, wherever they can be 
gotten together, is also effective. 

Moving pictures are used occasionally but are expensive and tend 
to be too obviously propaganda, and fall short in the degree to which 
this is true. Moving pictures have become a great source of in- 
fluence and if cleverly employed would undoubtedly be of much edu- 
cational value in city planning. To be fully effective, the moving 
picture must carry a good, thoroughly professional plot, based upon 
the spirit of city planning and the romance of city growth. It must 
not be labeled "educational." 

Pamphlets presenting the matter of city planning in a readable 
manner supplemented by diagrammatic and photographic illustra- 
tions are also of much value. Whenever any plan or group of plans 
is made, it should be written up in a non-technical report to be wide- 
ly distributed in the community. 

Much advance can also be made through the various civic clubs 
including such organizations as the Rotarian, Kiwanis, and Lion's 
Clubs, and Chambers of Commerce. These organizations are founded 
on a broad interest in public affairs. Their members are usually 
the first in a community to recognize fully the advantages of city 
planning. This issue should be carried into the regular meetings of 
these clubs by the best outside speakers obtainable as well as by 
their own members. From these enthusiastic discussions the question 
will be taken out by each member to his everyday associates. Un- 
believable progress can be made simply by talking city planning on 
the street and at dinner. 

These clubs can be further effective in creating a joint city plan- 
ning committee comprised of representatives of every organization 
in the city interested in public affairs. In the usual inability of 
city finances to carry the burden of adequate planning education, 
the effort might be financed by these organizations through their 
joint committee acting in an executive capacity. The whole matter 
of city planning education, both of the adult and of the school chil- 
dren might well find its source in such a committee, representative 
of the public spirited and far-sighted interests of the city. 

The second phase of city planning education, city planning in the 
public schools, is perhaps less difficult but even more important than 
the education of the adult. Here we can frankly admit that our pur- 
pose is to educate. We approach the mind when it is most recep- 
tive and while it is busy assembling ideas which are being woven 
into an attitude that will largely actuate the grown man or woman 
all through life. If along with other essentials the young student 



can be brought to a familiarity with his own city, and its manner of 
growth, and his own proper relation to this growth and to his fellow 
citizens, this impression will never leave him. His resulting con- 
sciousness of power and responsibility in civic affairs will grow with 
the expansion of his realm of influence and will inspire his active 
interest. This accomplished, the cause of city planning is won for all 
time. 

It is but seven years from the eighth grade to the ballot box and 
in the interim, the boy or girl is taking city planning home to father 
and mother demanding their attention. Results are obtained in a 
surprisingly short time. 

There is some difference of opinion as to the point where city 
planning should be introduced into the schools but it is generally con- 




KROM THE CIRCULAR PLAZA OK THE TOWN OK ORANGE ONE LOOKS IN 
KOUR DIRECTIONS TOWARD THE BUSINESS HOUSES AND BEYOND TO 
THE RESIDENCES. 

ceded that the most logical place to start this work, as such, is in the 
eighth grades. Most children graduate from the grammar school. A 
great many do not enter high school. The greatest number of stu- 
dents, therefore, of the highest average intelligence, are to be reached 
in the eighth grades. Educators tell us that the average mind has at- 
tained its height of intellectual development at this period and is as 
capable of grasping fundamentals of citizenship related to city build- 
ing as it ever will be. 

The methods of presenting this study must vary with the size and 
wealth of the community. First of all, there must be capable teach- 
ers and attention must be given to their preparation. Then there 
must be text-books, study outlines, and reference reading material. 
At this writing, there are no text books of general application de- 
signed for eighth grade classes. Some of the larger cities, notably 
Chicago, have utilized local text-books to great advantage and, where 
funds will permit, this is probably the best solution of the problem 
of presentation. This book need not be elaborate but should be 
abundantly illustrated and should treat of the home city and the 
simpler of its problems; the progress of other cities; and the broader 
ideas and ideals of planning. It might be printed in the school man- 
ual training shops which in some instances are equipped to do this 
work. Where the size of the city will warrant this expense the 
study might be presented by means of mimiographed sheets thor- 
oughly covering the subject, although it is q jestionable whether a 
well bound booklet might not be more economical for a city of ten 
thousand or more. 

The text-book should be supplemented by reference reading and 
talks by the local planning authorities, and by the expert who is or 
has been engaged upon the local city plan. 

It is not necessary to create a separate course for this study but is 
probably more advisable to combine this work with some established 
course such as "Civics". In actuality, it involves the most funda- 
mental phases of civics in application and might logically be given a 
large place in the year's attention to this subject. The work might 
(Continued on Page 2G) 

BELOW- THE MAIN STREET OK OJAI. A BEAUTIKUL SMALL TOWN. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



OJAI — oA community that lores and keeps its trees 



FOURTEEN miles back from the sea at 
Ventura high up among the foothills lies 
one of California's most charming valleys, 
Ojai, so called by the Indians, meaning a nest, 
and a nest it is surrounded by beautiful oak 
covered hills on the south and west and tower- 
ing rugged mountains on the north and east, 
with sparkling mountain streams flowing out 
of it through beautiful tree grown canyons. 

Down in the heart of this valley nestles a 
town both unique and charming. Unique be- 
cause it builds without destroying trees of 
natural beauty, charming because the things 
of utility have been fitted into this natural 
beauty in perfect harmony. From a plain lit- 
tle mountain town, a charming village of har- 
monious and beautiful architecture has been 
evolved, where all the necessities of modern 
home life may be had. The post office de- 
signed by Mead & Requa, its beautiful tower 
above the oaks suggesting the romance of old 
Spanish days, is pictured on our cover. 

The village itself carries out this same 
charming idea with a long arcade under the 
oaks, illustrated on the opposite page. Here 
one finds the various shops for necessities, too 
often offensive to the eye in small villages. 

To each newcomer the Ojai is a real dis- 
covery; but it is one thing to discover a beau- 
tiful spot, and quite another to add to its 
beauty and willingly share it with others. Up 
above the village proper there are some five 
hundred acres of rolling oak covered land 
through which winding roads have been con- 
structed and a few charming homes of pure 
Spanish architecture designed by George 
Washington Smith of Santa Barbara have 
been built. This with the reconstruction of 
the village is the beginning of what promises 
to be an exceedingly interesting and attractive 
development of California country homes. 



% JAMES FARRA 




OJAI VALLEY THROUGH AN ARCH OF THE FOOT- 
HILL HOTEL. 

Behind such an undertaking there must be a 
moving spirit, active force or whatever you 
choose to call it, a person or organization of 
vision, will and means to carry out the enter- 
prise. Behind the Ojai development is Mr. E. 
D. Libby of Toledo, Ohio. He came to the 
valley some years ago to make his winter 
home. Its beauty appealed to him. He bought 
the lands he now offers to share with others 
and has surrounded himself with able men 
who will carry out his and their own ideals. 

The Ojai Valley Company is the organiza- 
tion. Briggs C. Keck, who has made a notable 
success of similar work in the beautiful Arden- 
grove addition of Pasadena, is the president. 
To him will fall the task of carrying out the 
high ideals of creating a beautiful group 
of homes in harmony with the surroundings 



without destroying a single natural charm; 
and to show that a village of utility may be a 
thing of beauty. 

From the foothills one looks down over this 
charming valley which speads with its orange 
groves and fruit ranches like a magic carpet 
surrounded now by a brilliant hued border of 
wild flowers, which with the pinks of the fruit 
trees, blue of the lupus and brilliant gold of 
the flowering poppy amid hills of green some- 
times veiled by low floating clouds, makes a 
California spring-time picture never-to-be-for- 
gotten. 

There are two excellent hotels in the valley. 
One, El Roblar in the village which gives com- 
fort to the passer by, the other, The Foothills, 
high up against the mountainside where there 
is all the hospitality and delicious pure and 
fresh foods of a charming country home. 

From The Foothills Hotel one looks down 
over oak covered hills and valley with the vil- 
lage towers above the trees and curling smoke 
from the comfortable country homes along the 
hillside. 

Horse back riding is a joyous sport of the 
valley. Many miles of mountain roads, trails 
and bridle paths make it possible to ride for 
hours or days, and there are mountain 
ranches at which one may stop for a meal or 
overnight lodging. The Ojai will undoubted- 
ly some day have a wonderful golf course, 
natural surroundings suggest the cradle of 
golf, and there is ample opportunity to develop 
a course to perfection. 

The Thacher school is located in the Ojai 
Valley, from which many youths have gone 
forth with high ideals to enter the list of 
learning in larger institutions. This school 
has been a magnet which has drawn the par- 
ents of these boys to the valley. The natural 
charm of the place has held them. 




THE NATIVE BEAUTY OF CALIFORNIA IS HERE UNIMPAIRED. THE LOVEABLE LIVE OAKS DOMINATE AND ARE LEFT UNDISTURBED BY THE ROADS 
AND OTHER DEVELOPMENTS OF OJAI, THE DELIGHTFUL RESIDENCE TRACT WITH THE CHARMING TOWN AS ITS CENTER AND SOURCE OF SERVICE. 



1(1 



CALIFORNIA SOUTH LA SI* 




I LAY MY LUTE BESIDE 
THY DOOR 

Clarence Urmy 
in A California Troubadour 

What was it Colin gave to thee! — 
A blossom from the hawthorne tree? 
A flower of song is all I own, 
A little dreamland rose, half blown. 
Oh deck thy tresses, 1 implore — 
/ lay my lute beside thy door! 

What was it Damon sent to thee? — 
A gleaming pearl from Eastern sea? 
A gem of song is nil I own, 
A tiny, glistening, tear-stained stone. 
Oh, wear it — 'twill my peace restore — 
I lay my lute beside thy door! 

What was it Litbin brought to thee? 

A falcon from the dewy lea? 
A bird of song is all I own, 
And to thy heart it now has flown. 
Oh, cage it, let it roam no more — 
/ lay my lute beside thy door! 

Saratoga, California. 



1 hit speaking likeness and fine portrait 
of Mr. Sherman Thacher, founder and 
principal of the Thacher School at Ojai. 
California, was recently painted by lloiv- 
'ird Russell Butler, in his studio in the de la 
Guerra building, the center of art in Santa 
Barbara. 



The portrait is a gift to the school by 
the professors, past and present, and was 
instigated by Professor forest Cooke at the 
Thacher School, where the picture hangs. 



SANTA BARBARA'S GROWTH IN BEAUTY 



By EDWARD SAJOUS 



ORGANIZED for but two years, and including in its organization 
a community players' group, a School of Arts, a symphony 
orchestra and a plans and planting committee, the Santa Barbara 
Community Arts Association has brought to Southern California a 
new distinction in that on November 16 last the Carnegie Fund 
Corporation of New York, recognized the work of the association 
with a gift of $125,000, divided into a yearly income for five years of 
$25,000. The following letter has been sent to the members: 
Dear Fellow Member: 

The grant of the Carnegie Corporation to the Community Arts 
Association is a source of great encouragement and pride to us all. 
It was made in accordance with a new policy on the part of the 
corporation, that support and recognition be given to Art as a very 
important factor in education. 

We are thought worthy of this specific support and encouragement 
because we are making an effort here to bring more beauty into the 
town itself, and into all of its activities. 

The resolution of the Carnegie Corporation is as follows: 
"Resolved, that the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) 
a year for five years beginning October 1, 11)22, be, and it hereby is, 
appropriated to the Community Arts Association, Santa Barbara, 
California, for the educational work of the Association, provided 
that during this five-year period there be realized by the Association 
in gifts from other outside sources and from membership fees a 
progressive increase each year of at least 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 
and 50% respectively over the income from these two sources during 
the year ended September 30, 1922." 

This grant thus increases not only our resources and oppoitunlt'es, 
but also our responsibility, and to meet this added responsibility 
worthily, and with wide vision, requires the best thought and con- 
sideration of each and every member of our Association. 

We beg you, therefore, to consider our problem profoundly and to 
help by making definite suggestions as to: 

(1) How the educational function of the existing departments can 
be broadened and strengthened. 



(2) What new activities can most wisely be undertaken. 

Your advice will be greatly appreciated by the directors." 

Visions of other, many other "little theatre," community theatre 
and art movements in this country and in Europe are called to mind 
by the significance of the gift. Imagine the Provincetown Players, 
Antoines' Paris theatre, the Washington Square Players and the 
countless dramatic movements throughout the Middle West in their 
early, struggling days receiving as a gift an income of $25,000 a year! 

The players' branch of the association is its most active. During 
the past two years plays have been given monthly in a rented theatre 
to capacity houses. The players have been self-supporting through- 
out and have been directed by Miss Nina Moise, formerly with the 
Provincetown and Washington Players. Shaw, Barrie and "Pelleas 
and Melisande," together with some modern one-act plays formed 
the fare for the first year. 

A new theatre, to cost $150,000, including stagecraft, laboratory, 
little theatre, recital rooms, scene painting rooms and an auditorium, 
with the best equipped stage in America, is to be started almost 
immediately. The money has been raised and the land purchased. 

In the School of Arts, languages, dancing, music, painting and 
the allied arts are taught to large classes. Tuition is very low and 
scholarships to those who show talent are readily given. 
• The orchestra gives about two concerts a month on Sunday after- 
noons. The hall is sold out to subscriptions with a few seats left for 
box-office sale. The best in music is given, under the direction of 
Roger Clerbois, conductor, and soloists are brought from Los Angeles 
and San Francisco at regular intervals. 

In the plans and planting committee lies the duty of looking after 
the development of beautiful architecture. An architects' committee 
is ready to give advice and help to home builders and a prize for 
the best alteration of a business house frontage has been offered 
and awarded this season. Another portion of the committee has 
staged a garden competition among children in order that interest 
in beautiful gardens might be aroused. A campaign to do away 
with unsightly advertising is under way. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



11 



ART IN BALBOA PARK, SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA * CU S E S HOMAN 



of the Art Galleries 



IF one by any chance is fully engrossed with 
the phenomonal growth of his own city 
and is almost appalled by the constant change, 
the tearing down and building up of a frantic 
community that feels there is not space in a 
life to do all that is necessary, then it comes 
as a shock and a pleasant one, to realize that 
there are other communities near at hand im- 
bued with this same spirit of growth. San 
Diego with its traditions of Dons and Padres, 
that first step in the long line of civilization, 
so beautiful situated on its rolling hills and 
caressed by the warm sapphire waters of the 
Pacific has awakened with a start to its 
natural beauties and advantages. Nowhere in 
the Southwest could there be found a more 
ideal spot for a Dream City and the old Padres 
wisely felt this I am sure, but not in stone 
and plaster is it altogether written but in 
Education, Music and Art. 

Possessed of a Park made possible by the 
Exhibition, and embellished with buildings and 
shrubbery unequalled, the people of San Diego 
have wisely decided this to be their natural 
center of all things fine. A wonderful lesson 
this should be for our California cities. Paris, 
Philadelphia, Chicago, San Francisco as well 
as San Diego have all profitted by buildings 
left over after a World's Fair. A fund has 
been arranged and within a year the principal 
buildings have been made weather proof, re- 
painted and made things of beauty and utility. 
The magnificent bridge spanning a deep and 
beautiful canyon makes a most impressive ap- 
proach to the solid quadrangle, fortunately 
built of concrete and originally planned as a 
monument to the glories of the past. It would 
be difficult to surpass the California Building 
which serves as a reminder of the triumphs of 
Spain when she ruled on land and sea, and 
when she felt California was her choicest 
jewel, the El Dorado of the West. Here in 
fitting surroundings are the exhibits of the 
early races, and above in the broad galleries 
plans are busily taking shape for the installa- 
tion of the great scientific library which will 
give to San Diego a place in the sun. Oppo- 
site, guarded by the arched portals of a great 
arcade is the Art Gallery bravely trying and 
succeeding with the very able help of the 
Friends of Art, the Art Guild and many inter- 





IN BALBOA PARK, SAN DIEGO. CALIFORNIA. FROM A PAINTING BY ALSON CLARK. 



IRENE CASTLE. GRACEFUL AND DEBONAIR A 
NOTED EXPONENT OF AMERICAN DANCING. 



ested individuals to become a center in all 
that is best and fine in Painting and Sculpture. 
A very determined effort and one bound to 
succeed is being put forth that this gallery 
shall have a place in the Art World. A word 
should be said for the interior of this build- 
ing. The principal gallery was built as a 
Refectory room and is an exhibit in itself. Of 
noble proportions with its groined ceiling, 
minstrel gallery, and tiled floor it becomes a 
fitting background for the monuments in paint 
and marble that from time to time grace its 
walls. Beyond is the exquisite little Spanish 
chapel of St. Francis, below the gallery of the 
Art Guild. A beautiful winding staircase 
leads to the rooms above with splendid exhibits 
of old pottery. It is not widely enough known 
that in connection there is a very fine art 
school under the able direction of Eugene De 
Vol. Amazing is the rapid work of the 
students here and some day — not far away — 
we are bound to hear of these young men and 
women and admire their canvasses on the 
walls of salons and galleries. Sometime in the 
very near future there are to be studios ar- 
ranged for visiting artists and a very cordial 
invitation issued to the painters of the coun- 
try to come and enjoy the hospitality and 
beauties of the Southland. 

A long stretch of arcade and garden leads 
to the great Plaza and here one is lost in 
wonder for it is hard to realize in our busy 
rushing life we have not been set down in old 
Seville. The Sacramento Building facing this 
great square is soon to be replaced by a mag- 
nificent Art Gallery — the gift of Mrs. and Mr. 
A. Bridges and is to be a noble monument to 
their belief and pride in San Diego. Words 
seem inadequate to laud suffiicently this splen- 
did gift to a people who have the urge toward 
the right goal. The other buildings flanking 
this space are either being actually used in 
educational work or are in course of prepara- 
tion. Approached by a Mall from the Plaza 
is the great outdoor organ another gift from 
a public spirited citizen. Mr. Spreckels not 
only presented the organ but has made it pos- 
sible for the people of the city and the stranger 
within the gates daily to enjoy a splendid con- 
cert. From the Plaza leading to the extreme 
opposite side of the park another arcaded 
walk leads to the Southern Counties Building 
re-christened the Civic Auditorium where Club 
and Social life center. Model Farm, Zoo, 
shaded and beautiful walks, rose gardens, deep 
wooded canyons and over all the azure skies of 



a perfect climate, with snow capped moun- 
tains and the table lands of Mexico as a back- 
ground. Truly a paradise for the people. 

In Music San Diego has forged far ahead. 
With Symphony and the great artistes of the 
world assured the people show their apprecia- 
tion by crowded auditorium and heartfelt ap- 
plause. Many great musicians and singers 
have made little mental notes of the joy of 
their appearance there. Hand in hand with 
all the finer things, Education in the academic 
sense strides on and on accomplishing the 
wonders that we are prone to accept without 
comment forgetting the trials and tribulations 
of the brave and harrassed group known in 
a vague way as the "Board," but again we 
are brought up with a start, for suddenly we 
are confronted with a tremendous thing — a 
High School Symphony. Three years ago 
Signor Nino Marceli took charge of this in- 
fant orhcestra and predicted they would play 
symphony in three years, and in that time 
they have done it. Before an enthusiastic- 
audience these youngsters, ranging in ages 
from 13 to 17, acquitted themselves so well 
that round after round of applause called for 
more and more. The difficulties of Beethoven's 
first symphony, the bigness and majestic- 
rhythm of the march from Tannhauser, the 
operatic harmonies of the Stradella overture, 
all were given without a false note or break 
in rhythm to mar the performance. With it 
all, the earnest young musicians give of them- 
selves their own freshness and vitality of 
youth in a coloring that gave to the music a 
peculiar and delightful distinctiveness. The 
attainment of this result by Signor Marcelli 
in the brief time of his leadership is great 
cause for appreciation and deep thought. This 
distinguished musician has brought his un- 
usual ability here and devoted it to the mak- 
ing of an educational orchestra which would 
be difficult to rival anywhere. 
And thus in all ways San Diego has persist- 
ently and without trumpeting forged ahead. 
Steadily and thoughtfully its citizens have 
planned and given to the common cause of 
advancement, and thus we are brought sud- 
denly face to face with the fact that another 
center of culture has developed. This very 
fact is the one thing that will make our own 
Southland a name forever. Not only acres of 
buildings, great highways, the turning of 
millions; but in real accomplishment of train- 
ing and development of mind, in the search- 
ing for the beautiful — the making of tradition. 



12 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



CARLE J. BLENNER AT CANNELL and CHAFFIN'S % M. URMY SEARES 



A PAINTER of beauti- 
ful women and of flow- 
ers! A master of the art of 
putting paint on canvas so 
that it will stay and every- 
one who sees it will want it 
to stay forever! Here in 
Los Angeles, at the art gal- 
lery which gives to the city 
and country dwellers op- 
portunity to see the work of 
artists who have already 
arrived at the height of 
their profession, we have 
for the month of March a 
feast of beauty that every 
lover of art will and can 
enjoy. 

Separated as we are by 
thousands of miles from 
the helpful studios of world 
artists. California can never 
have even its own art Cen- 
ters until etlOUeh of its resi- 
dent artists know all th*>t 
there is to bp known of 
t<"-hnioup and the nro«osses 
of painting and modelling. 
One swallow does not make 
a sumtre' - . six or eiVht 
good painters cannot influ- 
ence a whole community so 
that it will know the best 
art and buy it. An art at- 
mosphere can never come to 
a city which thinks only of 
the price mark on a paint- 
ing. Art is a capricious 
mistress. Enough people 
must love her for herself 
alone before she deigns to 
dwell in any one place. 

If we ask ourselves, Is 
there an art center in the 
southland of California? 
We must answer no, not 
yet. What have we pro- 
duced in the first half cen- 
tury of our existence as an 
American community? Our 
schools have exploited the 
desire on the part of our 




IF THIS PICTURE WKKK IN THE LKXEMBERG GALLERIES IT WOULD HE CALLED "GIRL 
WITH LOCKET." ITS AUTHOR. CARL BLENNER THE AMERICAN rORTR A IT PAINTER 
NOW IN LOS ANGELES. CALLS IT "MEMORIES." 



young people to express 
themselves in art. The 
new schools at The Otis 
Foundation and the Chin- 
ouard School have not had 
time to develop talent; and 
what young artists have 
grown up here are depend- 
ent on the visits of painters 
and sculptors trained in 
distant centers. 

Here then is Carle J. 
Blenner, visiting and paint- 
ing in the studio of Jack 
W. Smith who has gone to 
Laguna. 

F. W. Coburn in the Bos- 
ton Sunday Herald gives an 
eastern art critic's review 
of an exhibition of Mr. 
Blenner's paintings in that 
city last year. 

"This is Mr. Blenner's 
first one-man show in Bos- 
ton, though he has from 
time to time shown works 
at the general exhibitions 
of the Boston Art Club. In 
1906 he won one of the 
Hallgarten prizes of the 
National Academy of De- 
sign. His canvas "Repose" 
may be recalled by those 
who attended the St. Louis 
exposition in 1904. 

Flowers these later years 
have much preoccupied Mr. 
Blenner. His equipment is 
singularly good for realiz- 
ing much of the brilliancy 
and the delicacy of the dis- 
plays which he sets up in 
oriental jars with nice, but 
not formal or stiff, arrange- 
ment. His treatment of the 
flower pieces is consider- 
ably looser and freer than 
in his figure composition — 
a technique which is no 
doubt enforced by the neces- 
sity of working ra;iidly lest 



OVER MANTEL, PAINTING BY CARLE J. BLENNER. LILACS AND APPLE BLOSSOMS OF SPRING, NOW ON EXHIBITION IN LOS ANGELES. C ALIFORI A. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



13 



DAHLIAS, NOW SO POPULAR ALL OVER THE COUNTRY ARE HERE COMBINED IN ONE OF MR. BLENNER'S SUCCESSFUL OVER MANTELS OF WHICH 

COUNTRY LIFE HAS RECENTLY SHOWN BEAUTIFUL REPRODUCTIONS IN COLOR. 




the flowers fade before the apparition is achieved. He is at the same 
time enough of a conscientious draftsman not to be content with mere 
blobs and blotches of color. You feel enough of the botanical con- 
struction to be satisfied, if you like representations to resemble what 
they purport to depict, and still you find nothing suggestive of the 
precise glory of the seed catalogue. Air, too, abounds in most of 
these pictures. There is something between us and the flowers." 




AT THE WINDOW, A NOTABLE PAINTING OF FLOWERS AGAINST LIGHT. 



PEONIES. MR. BLENNER'S FLOWER PIECES, ONE OF WHICH IS IN THE 
GALLERY OF ALLEN BALCH OF LOS ANGELES, ARE NOW BEING HUNG 
IN ALL THE MUSEUMS OF AMERICA. 



14 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




California 

ONE and indivisible is the devotion which Californians, 
whether native born or adopted, feel for the long 
stretch of land lying along the Pacific Ocean from latitude 
42 to the southern border of the United States. So deep 
does this emotion lie in the heart of each individual ack- 
nowledging it, that superficial exuberance or the entire lack 
of expression can neither be taken as a measure of its sin- 
cerity. There seems to be nothing exactly like this enthus- 
iastic devotion to the land itself in any other part of the 
Union. In the old South is found similar loyalty but less 
talk about it. In Western New York where the low stone 
fences run zigzagging across country, and hill and dale are 
abloom in the Spring, the heart of the native beats a little 
faster as he thinks, "this is my country." And then, as 
the race of Americans treks westward across pioneer terri- 
tory, building school houses and towns, enduring priva- 
tions, cultivating farms, possessing the land, this love of 
America, as such, grows bigger and bigger and bursts into 
a veritable song of possession when the mountains are mas- 
tered and the Pacific discovered by each individual new- 
comer to the ('oast. California by nature has been made 
so desirable that men have fought with swords and still 
fight with words for the right to be called her champions. 
Calm and unruffled by all the commotion, California smiles 
on all and weaves about each new devotee the spell of her 
enchantment. 

The Argonaut seeking gold and adventure found, after 
heart rending experiences in reaching it, a great beautiful 
bay in the very center of the Coast and two great valleys 
with wide flowing rivers leading to it. Commerce and agri- 
culture were easily within his grasp but distance from 
home and a market seemed unconquerable. But conquer it 
he did and built the great transcontinental railroads con- 
necting us with our homes on the Atlantic. He made the 
name of California known to the world. He organized law 
and order where men were too apt to call license, liberty. 
He instituted a great University manned by the best from 
Harvard and Yale and Johns Hopkins and the fame of its 
sincerity and sound education has gone out to the ends of 
the earth. Cook and Sill, the Le Contes, Howison and 
Slate, Morse Stephens, and Gayley — how their standards 
have stood for sound learning in this western state; how 
their names ring in the hearts of all who studied under 
their influence! Here is a great institution built from its 
very inception in 1850 upon the best educational tradi- 
tions in America, and now grown to be as vital a part of 
a Calif ornian's pride in his state as the climate or any other 
God-given attribute. 

The railroads were built and the multitude of health 
seekers, home seekers, pleasure seekers came out on trains- 
de-luxe — five and six long trains a day crossing in comfort 
alkali desert, mountain grades, desolate country where pack 
train and prairie schooner had dragged through dust and 
death dealing hardships for many weary months to reach 
the promised land. In the south the tourists built them- 
selves great hostelries to play in for the winter. Settling 
down they found a land not so easily farmed as are the 
great fertile valleys of California, but very much easier 
than the farms they left behind them in the middle west. 
Their energies went into getting water for irrigation and in 
building a harbor where there was none. And they too 
have contributed to the civilization of California. Now 
they have a share in the fame of the state of California, 
now from this year on, they will have in their very midst a 
full branch of the State University giving not only a splen- 
did education to the teachers in our public schools but a 
four years' course in the liberal arts to all our young people 
who cannot afford to go away from home for college work. 
The influence of this high standard which our State Uni- 
versity has always maintained and for which it is noted 
among American Universities is already being felt. The 
southland of California claims the University of Califor- 
nia as it claims the Capitol at Sacramento and the climate. 



Americanization 

ACCORDING to the census of 1920 the white popula- 
tion of the United States was a trifle under 95,000,000. 
Of these fully 40,000,000 were descended from the old col- 
onial stock. Of the 55,000,000 not so descended, about 
40,000,000 were of North European stocks. What propor- 
tion of these had for their ideals of government principles 
similar to those of the founders of the republic is not stated 
in our statistics, but this Americanization is something far 
deeper than mere assimilization as citizens. 

With so great a mass of people, all voting — as they speed- 
ily proceed to do — "the great American majority" may as 
easily speak in the voice of northern Europe as in the voice 
of America. Let us listen to this voice and try to analyze 
its overtones. This insistance on the institutionalization 
of everything — is it not the voice of northern Europe — the 
voice of Berlin's civic code? This constant demand that 
"the Government" do something, is it an echo from colon- 
ial days — the expression of a people who govern them- 
selves ? 

So sure are we Americans that majority rule is right 
that we have failed to look to the quality of that majority; 
so subtle is the growth of institutions that it is hard to dis- 
tinguish the outgrowth of colonial times from the grafted 
ideals of the great mass of would-be Americans who have 
brought untried or outlived ideas from northern Europe 
and are announcing them as American. 

The granting of suffrage to women has doubled the for- 
eign vote, and we may well ask ourselves if the sudden 
transposition of the women of German extraction, for in- 
stance, from her submissive position to that of a maker of 
state constitutions is wise from any point of view. What 
preparation for American citizenship can the mass of girl 
teachers in our public schools give to the rising genera- 
tion? Who knows that the Constitution of the United 
States, as Dr. James Scherer announced in his lecture on 
Prohibition last month at the Current Events Club in 
Pasadena, was made as a protection, a balance wheel in 
majority rule, rather than an embodiment of majority 
opinion? Ability to decide the right or wrong of each 
minor question as it comes up at the polls is not in itself 
enough : good citizenship demands a knowledge of the 
fundamentals of government the very existence of which 
is unknown to the masses who have grown up under a 
paternal bureaucracy which has encouraged individual ig- 
norance of matters so vital to democratic government. 

The Printmaker's International 

ROI PARTRIDGE, foremost among California's etchers, 
has come down to Los Angeles from San Francisco 
to act on the jury of awards of the Printmakers Show 
with Mr. Ferguson, State Librarian, William A. Griffith, 
Edgar Hampton and William R. Downes. The following let- 
ter was written by Mr. Partridge at the request of the 
editor. 

Los Angeles, February 2fi, 1923. 

In response to your suggestion, and in behalf of Mr. Ferguson, 
who asked me to please perform his share, I herewith enclose brief 
information concerning the forthcoming International Exhibit of 
Prints at the Los Angeles museum. I did not note down the names 
of the jury of award — you can get them from Brown. 

I should like to have gone on and said something to the effect 
that this is one of the most notable exhibitions of prints occurring 
in the United States and even in the entire world, and that it is 
largely made possible through the generosity, the self-sacrifice and 
indefatigable industry of Howell C. Brown. 

Sincerely, Roi Partridge. 

The jury of awards has completed its work of selecting the five 
prize winning prints from the great number which were submitted 
to the forthcoming International Exhibition of Etchings of the Print 
Makers' Society of California. 

The gold medal for the best print shown goes to Armin Hansen 
for a magnificently conceived and etched plate called Sardine Barge. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



15 




The silver medal was awarded to The High Mill, a mezzotint by 
Leonard Squirrell. 

The bronze medal went to Auerbach Levy for a splendidly drawn 
portrait in soft-ground etching of the celebrated Yiddish actor, 
Ben- A mi. 

The Huntington purchase prize of $100 goes to The Wayfarers 
by Alfred Bentley. 

And finally the Bryan prize for the best American print was 
awarded to East Side by Edward Hopper. 

It is interesting to compare the large and bold plate by Armin 
Hansen, which received the gold medal, with the small, exquisitely 
delicate and beautifully executed plate by the Englishman, Alfred 
Bentley, to which was given the $100 Huntington purchase prize 
— a comparison that indicates both the catholicy of the jury and the 
infinitely varied capacity of this art of etching. 

An outstanding fact to be noted about the awards this year is 
that no color work was chosen, no lithographs were chosen and no 
wood engravings nor wood block prints were chosen although there 
were numerous and attractive examples of each in the exhibition. 
It would seem that the many-sided beauty of etchings is causing them 
to outdistance their rivals in the world of prints. 

Immediately upon the completion of the selection of prize winners 
by the jury of awards, Mr. Milton Ferguson, the State Librarian, 
himself one of the jury, bought the fine prize winning prints for the 
State Library at Sacramento, where they will remain for the gi'atifi- 
cation of art lovers now and for posterity. It should be added this 
purchase could only be made by using the remainder of the present 
budget, as with the forthcoming budget dictated by the economies 
of the present gubernatorial incumbent, no further purchases of 
prints or books will be possible for the next two years. 

The exhibition will be hung in the central gallery of the Los 
Angeles museum, and will be on view and free to the public from 
March 1 to 31. 

Melting Pot or Cockpit 

STATISTICIANS could doubtless tell us what proportion 
of immigrants to the United States from Europe, Asia 
and Africa, came here under compulsion. True to our ideals 
of affording a home for the oppressed of all nations, we 
have, hitherto, opened our doors to all who sought liberty, 
and have with equal consistency endeavored to close them 
to any wholesale importation of slaves, laborers, or ex- 
plosion's colonists. The mass of the inhabitants of the 
United States are, therefore, here because they were born 
here or because they wanted to come. 

It might be a good plan for some statisticians among the 
Americanizationists to enlighten us with lists of reasons 
why different classes of Europeans came to these United 
States and just what accompanying ideals of liberty they 
brought with them. 

Should we not find that most of the new comers from 
Europe came during the last four or five decades, not so 
much to flee from oppression as to improve their individual 
circumstances? The period when America was the chief 
refuge of the oppressed had, in fact, just about dwindled 
to an end when the great German war made a clean sweep 
of it For, by combining to drive back within their own 
territory the warlike tribes of the north under their mon- 
archal leaders, the allied democracies of the world ended 
the reign of the last representative of oppression by the 
divine right of kings which had in past centuries colonized 
America. At any rate that traditional slogan of Ameri- 
cans, which advertised this country as the refuge of the 
oppressed is no longer appropriate; and that for two rea- 
sons. First, there is no longer oppression m Europe 
from which an intelligent man or woman can flee without 
drawing upon himself the name of coward. Every little 
nation, every big nation, every small hamlet in Europe to- 
day has need of all the intelligence its citizens can muster 
in organizing self government. No lover of liberty m 
Europe has any call to run away to America; but can 
effectively give his life for liberty at home. Besides, we 
have trouble enough of our own. Every trouble now found 
in Europe for her citizens to settle has already been brought 
to the United States by groups of previous emigrants, so 



that our second reason for declining to be in the future a 
home for the oppressed is that they are oppressed only by 
their own ignorance and selfishness and they bring that 
with them instead of leaving it outside our gates. 

America has thus become the cockpit of Europe, and in 
the crowded sections of New York and other large cities 
young literati pin spurs onto the feet of Pegasus to fill our 
story books and magazines and newspapers with records of 
the daily fights among the severally oppressed. 

To speak of our avoiding the entangling alliances of 
Europe is therefore rank nonsense. Unknown to our ab- 
sorbed senators who are supposed to arrange our alliances, 
the great sluice boxes of civilization have been opened. 
Europe has poured into America. During the war America 
poured back into Europe — Italians with American ideas tu 
the Italian front, Armenians and Greeks from California to 
the Mediterranean, Germans to their own front or to 
Gibraltar, descendants of all nations on our own troop ships 
to France, and back again with a wider vision and some 
grains of understanding of what it meant to maintain a 
republic in the midst of European monarchies. 

The whole world is the melting pot stirred by the stick 
of war instead of commerce. We can no more avoid the 
problems of Europe than we can undiscover the methods of 
radio — for America is in Europe though our soldiers have 
returned to us — and Europe is in America striving to for- 
get her age long quarrels and differences. 

What Is Christianity? 

THE San Francisco Argonaut discussing a recent church 
controversy, has started deep thought in the minds of 
many of its readers and we may expect many answers to 
its question, "What is Christianity," so simply asked. 

The great war, started deliberately as it was in a country 
where Luther's bible still exists — a country calling itself 
Christian, has forced this question out into the open; and 
the more it is discussed, the more surely will the doubts and 
discouragements engendered by the war be dispelled. 
"You can't change human nature" is the cocksure conclu- 
sion of those who believe there is no cure for war. History 
as studied today gives evidence of great similarity in the 
character of successive tribes, races and nations occupying 
the earth throughout the past, and gives much weight to 
this view. Deep in each man's heart is found an echo, a 
suspicion that this cocksure conclusion may be true and 
that human nature has in itself the elements of its own 
destruction. 

Now' comes in Christianity and our definition of it: — 
Christianity is that which can change human nature, is 
changing it daily and has changed it tremendously in the 
past. And the more cocksure we are that a man cannot 
pull himself over the fence by his bootstraps, the more do 
we emphasize the divine origin of Christianity which is 
raising the human race by changing human nature. 

If we raise again the question asked so often during the 
last terrible years: — "Why didn't Christianity prevent the 
war?" there are, in the light of this definition of Christianity 
many and various answers, chief among them being the fact 
that the warlike race which made the war was of all modern 
nations the most unchanging since medieval, feudal times. 

The great touchstone for Christianity given us by its 
Founder is ever at hand, "A new commandment give I unto 
you that ye love one another." "Love God with all thy 
heart, soul and mind and thy neighbor as thyself." "If any 
man" (or nation) will be "Christian," "let him deny him- 
self," viz. say "No" to self interest. 

Has anyone noticed Germany as a state denying herself, 
— saying that as a state she is equal only to her neighbors ? 
Before, during or since the war has Germany as a state 
shown anything but a colossal selfishness so complete that 
it would engulf the world? Why then call such a nation, 
Christian merely because this is the era of Christianity? 

Christianitv is that which can change human nature until 
nations of the world love their neighbors as themselves. 



lb 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



THE CASE OF IRENE: APATHY VERSUS APPLAUSE 

By ELLEN LEECH 



AT times it really seems 
pretty hard to know 
just how to pattern our 
manners; with one-half 
the world calling for re- 
pression and the other 
half exploiting every emo- 
tion, featuring each in- 
nermost thought for the 
benefit of the neighbors, it 
is becoming a trifle diffi- 
cult to evince just the ex- 
act amount of enthusiasm 
each occasion demands. 
This was very apparent at 
a recent appearance of 
Irene Castle during tea at 
the Ambassador. It would 
seem the most natural 
thing in the world to show 
appreciation for anything 
so dainty, so carefully and 
gracefully done as her 
dances, without the least 
dread of being thought 
boisterous but, apparently, 
not so. 

A very representative 
Los Angeles audience 
chatted and sipped their 
tea while awaiting her ap- 
pearance and manifested 
their approval of the first 
dance by a very gentle lit- 
tle patter of applause, and 
when she immediately re- 
sponded with a delightful- 
ly gay little etherealized 
cake walk there was an- 
other little clapping, al- 
most as decorous as if in 
church, and, naturally, 
Irene felt she had been 
"dammed with faint 
praise." However, no- 
body realized this and so 
sat satisfied and pleased 
with themselves and the 
world, waiting for her to 
reappear in a different 
gown and do another pas 
seul for their entertain- 
ment, which did not hap- 
pen, as Mrs. Castle felt 
she was boring them, and 
it was hardly fair to ask 
her to force herself upon 
them. 

What is the matter with 
us? Is it because we can't 
decide whether to be all 
repression, or all expres- 
sion. When the soft pat- 
ter of applause came from 
the larger tables where 
the more, or less, dowager 
ladies were sitting in judg- 
ment, the small and slink- 
lily gowned flappers at ad- 
jacent tables couldn't 
bring themselves to outdo 
the mothers and potential 
mothers-in-law by a more 
determined approbation so 
the matter was wrecked 
between the two opinions 
as to propriety. 

From all we have heard 
of the ascendancy of the 
flapper in matters of judg- 
ment it wouldn't seem pos- 
sible they would await the 
approval of anyone before 
announcing to a congre- 
gated world what they 
thought but the fact re- 
mains that though the 
debutants, the sub-deba 
and the assembled flap- 
pers, from Heaven knows 
where, drawn by the lure 
of the irresistable Irene, 
outnumbered the elders, 
yet there was no flamboy- 
ant outburst. There can 
be no question of the lure, 
it is there, just as bright 
and as strong as when she 




IF WE MUST BE REPRESSED THEN TAKE A LESSON FROM WILLIAM REARDON IRENE 
CASTLE'S DANCING PARTNER. AND SEE HOW WONDERFULLY HE DOES 1 IT HE MAKES Ol 
HIMSELF A PERFECT BACKGROUND. JUST AS A PAINTER USES A PIECE OI' VELVET, EM- 
PHASIZING ALL ITS LIGHTS AND SHADOWS, TO COMPLETE A PORTRAIT HE ,18 DOING .UNTIL 
OCCASIONALLY THE BACKGROUND IS SPOKEN OF WITH THE SAME EN THUS ASM AS THE 
CENTRAI FIGURE BO REARDON BECOMES NOT ONLY A PART OF THE PICTURE BUT THE 
FRAME AS WELL, AND BY HIS PART OF THE WORK COMPLETES THE PERFECTION. 



first flashed across the 
starry sky of the dancing 
world. Irene Castle is one 
of those artists whose 
charm is hardly to be de- 
fined by anything tangible, 
there have been just as 
good dancers, possibly 
some with better technic, 
but who cares for that; 
there have been more 
beautiful women, and as 
for gowns, other women 
still wear them but the 
fact remains that she has 
that something because of 
which she stands alone and 
which allows her to give 
pleasure in the superla- 
tive degree. 

There are so many 
things that gratify us in 
the world, and there are 
special thrills reserved for 
some of them; for in- 
stance, the delight in be- 
ing alive that assails you 
at the rising note of the 
meadow lark, no matter 
at what hour of the day; 
the perfume of a violet 
bed, the fragrance of new 
mown hay, and the first 
glimpse of a beautiful ani- 
mal, — a horse just enter- 
ing the ring of a horse 
show, — all give a sudden, 
swift throb of gratitude 
for the gifts life has to 
offer. Her dancing in a 
way brings something of 
the pleasure of all of these, 
not with the same unex- 
pectedness, not a sudden 
rush of joy but a culmina- 
tion of several quiet and 
vivid pleasures all in one. 

Then how do we explain 
our apathy? Is it possible 
the West is losing some of 
its individuality, that we 
are afraid to show our 
feelings for fear of being 
accused of manners unbe- 
coming a perfect lady ! 
That would hardly explain 
it, as the term is so obso- 
lete it would scarcely be 
understood. It is going to 
be a pity however if be- 
tween the old fashioned 
"perfect lady" and the 
most modern "flapper" we 
are to lose the genuine 
American manner of lik- 
ing what we like when we 
like it, and saying so. All 
the varieties of prohibi- 
tion under which we live, 
some for the best, and 
some not so good, may 
have had some effect in 
bringing about this re- 
pression, but as long as 
we can safely still express 
some opinions do let us 
give praise where praise 
is due. It is just likely we 
may arise some bright 
morning to find the papers 
are announcing the edict 
has gone forth we are no 
longer to breath, either 
because the air is so con- 
taminated it won't be good 
for us, or more likely be- 
cause we are so contami- 
nated we won't be good 
for the air, it makes no 
real difference which, but 
until that time comes it 
seems a pity not to enjoy 
everything enjoyable, and 
let the people who are 
trying to give us pleasure 
know that they have suc- 
ceeded. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 17 

TOWN AND COUNTRY CLUB FUNCTIONS 





ACTIVITIES AT THE RANCHO COUNTRY CLUB. THE CENTER 
FOR SPORTS AT THE AMBASSADOR, LOS ANGELES 



18 



CALIFORNIA SOUTH L A Y D 



A BIT OF BOSTON IN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 




THE ENTRANCE HALL. WITH ITS COMFORTABLE 
FIREPLACE AND QUIET CHEERFULNESS, GIVES 
THE KEY TO ALL. 

NOW that we have a bit of old Boston 
transferred to Los Angeles, in the form 
of the Assembly Tea Room, at 642 South 
Flower street, we realize with a sigh of grati- 
tude that it satisfies a heretofore unsuspected 
need. 

On entering the spacious lobby, with its high 
ceiling, and dignified sweep of hangings, the 
lovely old furniture elicits a cry of admira- 
tion, you feel at once the charm that rests in 
the rare old pieces and in the old colonial 
mirror. The crackling of the back-log on the 
old fire-dogs is a heart warming thing, and on 
other days as the sun shines brighter we 
glimpse through the arched doorways the gar- 
den beyond, lovely with the trees, shrubs, and 
climbing vines, weaving their own stories of 
old Boston around this new center on the Pa- 
cific Coast. Soothed by the tinkle of the foun- 
tain, many tea parties gather in this quiet 
spot, within so few blocks of Broadway and 
yet as removed as though miles away. 



Throughout, and pervading the whole, there 
is a savor of the stately hospitality of bygone 
times an atmosphere of brocade and lace ruf- 
fles, and we imbibe unconsciously something 
of the old Colonial peace and plenty, and are 
grateful for the restful harmony which sur- 
rounds us. 

We are apt to think atmosphere can only be 
obtained by age and associations, and this, in 
a measure, is quite true, but atmosphere may 
be transferred, just as it has been here, by one 
imbued with all the traditions surrounding the 
old State House in Boston, and through that 
transference this delightfully restful spot of 
solace has been set down in the midst of this 
busy, rushing, most modern town. Naturally 
one who can do all this can do more, and add 
to the harmony of the tea hour the further 
enjoyment of an orange roll, the like of which 
is not obtained elsewhere, and to the dinner's 
enjoyment a Banbury tart or a Brown Betty. 

Just as there are people who would rather 
have new, bright, shiny things from Grand 
Rapids, than the lovely old mellow pieces of 
Revolutionary days, so we have people who 
prefer jazz to quiet restfulness, but to those 
who crave the latter this tea room is sheer 
delight and supplies for a large class of people 
a need Los Angeles is only now realizing. 

Because of the enjoyment of the charms and 
reflections Boston has to give us, we leave that 
city with regret but never with noise and 
shouting, so in leaving the tea room we feel 
the necessity of closing the door softly not to 
jar its peace and not to let in from without 
the clamor into which we step on leaving. 

The charm of the place is that of some 
quaint old fashioned garden, redolent of stock, 
lilac and lavender; some people don't care for 
old gardens — some do, — and there is the whole 
story of the place as I see it. 

This lovely spot is owned and managed by 
Mrs. Margaret Bradley Purdy, whose love of 




AT THE BACK, WHERE A CIRCULAR STAIRWAY 
LEADS UP TO THE OFFICES, AND A PARTIAL 
VIEW OF THE CARDROOM. 

California has prompted her to make the quiet 
resting spot and the charming old garden. 

The people of California will remember 
Mrs. Purdy, who entertained and managed the 
Massachusetts State House during the Inter- 
national Exposition at San Francisco. 





CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 19 

GOWNS FOR EVERY GAIETY--AT BEDELL'S 





ORCHID, THE COLOR OF SPRING! MATERIAL. ROMAINE AND AN ALL 
OVER BEADED DESIGN MAKE THIS THE VERY LATEST THING IN DINNER 

GOWNS. 

OLD SILVER AND SHEFFI 

1ADY ASH BROOK'S bracelets, all in blue turquoise, on a supple 
j band that makes you want to put it on and feel it clasp your 
wrist! Lovely jewels, old silver that adorned a lord's table, bits of 
colonial silver-ware and handsome loving cups that put to shame our 
shoddy champion cups offered for prizes at Club and contest! Here in 
Pasadena they all are set in an atmosphere most fitting in the Cheese- 
wright Studios. Few towns could offer a more appropriate place for 
showing this unique exhibition. Every American with one drop of 
colonial blood in her veins will be greatly tempted by this display of 
objects so dear to the home maker. For however strong we may be for 
Democracy, our convictions in regard to equal rights for all have, here 
in America, taken the form of equal share for all in the joy and beauty 
of life. The fine art of living is, therefore, our main study in such a 
magazine as California Southland and we welcome the opportunity 




NO. 33. EXCEPTIONALLY BEAUTIFUL OLD IRISH SILVER TRAY IN THE 
STANTON COLLECTION AT CHEESE WRIGHTS', PASADENA. 




■■■■Hi 

AND THEN A NEW WRAP OF BLACK SILK ALSO COV3RED WITH A 
BEADED DEirTGN AND ENRICHED WITH ERMINE IN A GREAT COLLAR 

AND CUFFS. 

ELD PLATE ON EXHIBITION 

to study at first hand old plate and antique jewelry from the homes of 
such experts in the art as Lord Fermoy of Rockbartan Castle, County 
Limerick, Ireland; the Earl of Mayo, Palmerstown, Staff an; Lady 
Ardilaun; and the Countess of Limerick, Hall Place, Bexley, Kent, 
England, who, like many others, have sold their household belongings 
lately. 

Brought to America by Mrs. Harriette M. Stanton of Dublin, Ireland, 
these beautiful old pieces are for sale in California and shjuld not be 
allowed to leave the state. Many of them are museum pieces and 
should be" in our museums, that our young people may grow familiar 
with the beauty of craftsmanship and learn to do beautiful work, 
many more should be on our tables used every day that our lives may 
be enriched by constant association with beauty in utility. 




NO. !). VERY RARE PIERCED OVAL SILVER CAKE BASKET. 1768. ACQUIRED 
BY MRS. HENRY E. HUNTINGTON OF SAN MARINO, CALIFORNIA. 



20 



CALIFORNIA SOU T 11 L A A D 



PASADENA, THE SEAT OF MT. WILSON OBSERVATORY 



THE Pasadena Star-News, that excellent 
type of the model town paper, gave a full 
page in February to the Mount Wilson Ob- 
servatory, showing its appreciation of what 
this institution means to the community in 
which it is situated. That the city, lying so 
close to the foot of the mountain which is 
known throughout the civilized world, should 
claim some association of its name with that 
of the famous observatory is but natural — 
for Pasadena ministers to the "Monastery" and 
the observers on the summit as well as to the 
laboratories and homes of the staff in the city 
itself. 

Yet it is only recently that residents of 
Pasadena have made a point of explaining to 
visitors the difference between Mt. Lowe and 
Mt. Wilson, nor do many know aught of the 
scientific work done at the world renowned 
group of telescopes which may be seen on the 
summit of the range gleaming white in the 
last rays of the setting sun. 

The Contribution* from the Mount Wilson 
Observatory. — Reprinted from the Astrophysi- 
cal Journal, Chicago — numbering 219 to 243 
during 1922 have so far appeared, and a curs- 
ory review of their titles and authors gives 
an enlightened glimpse of the work done at 
the observing end on the mountain and in 
the laboratories and measuring rooms at the 
Pasadena plant. One of the great and unique 
features of this California observatory insti- 
tuted by the genius of its director, George E. 
Hale, is the opportunity given workers in its 
laboratory to reproduce, as nearly as their 
imaginations may conceive, the conditions sup- 
posed to exist in a star many thousands of 
light years away. The known metals are 
studied and their spectra analyzed in the lab- 
oratories and every method tested for accur- 
acy. No. 219 is, therefore, entitled "The 
Vacuum Spark Spectra of the Metals" and 
most of us can imagine what a paper on 
that subject would be; although we may be 
surprised to see that it is written by a woman, 
Edna Carter of Vassar, who, like many an- 
other visitor at Mt. Wilson Observatory, came 
for a few months to do special work. 

In No. 221, R. F. Sanford, of the regular 
staff, writes of "The Orbits of Certain Spec- 
troscopic Binaries." That certain stars have 
been proved to be double by their spectra 
alone is doubtless news to many. Yet it is 
stale news to astronomers. The wonders of 
that great wireless conversation going on be- 
tween astronomers and the stars by means 
of the spectrogram can hardly be given to 
this generation, for it v/ill not take time to 
learn to read so mysterious a language of 
signs. But here in No. 221 the astronomer not 
only knows that a certain star he has chosen 



to study is a double star, but (for the benefit 
of other astronomers who have to know) he 
has calculated the orbits of two double stars 
which cannot be seen to be double in any 
telescope. 

In No. 222 J. A. Anderson writes on The 
Wave-length in Astronomical Interferometer 
Measurements. That is plain enough and pos- 
sible for any one interested to study out by 
dictionary. The reward will be great in in- 
creased knowledge of how astronomers work. 
But one sentence from the author's abstract, 
given at the head of each pamphlet, will per- 
haps interest the earnest student who wants 
to learn the Mt. Wilson language. "The sep- 
aration of double stars and the diameters of 
star discs are measured by the interferometer 
in terms of an effective wave length" — so 
you see, that by making waves of light hit 
each other head on, and interfer with each 
other's progress, an instrument can stop them 
long enough to measure the distance between 
their sources, no matter how many light years 
have been occupied by those light waves in 
coming to Mt. Wilson. An Investigation 
of the Constancy in Wave-length of the Atmo- 
spheric and Solar Lines is the title of No. 
223, by Charles E. St. John and Harold D. 
Babcock, both well known in Pasadena as be- 
ing on the regular staff of the Observatory. 
"In 1915," the abstract tells us, "Perot re- 
ported having found the wave-length of an 
line considerably longer at noon than at 
sunrise and sunset." Now that is perfectly 
permissible if a waye-length wants to act in 
that way, but if you are an astronomer you 
want to know the reason why. "Since these 
( Fraunhofer) lines are constantly used as 
standards of wave-length in solar observa- 
tions, a study of the wave-length as a func- 
tion of the altitude of the sun was made" — 
and this paper tells all about what results 
were obtained so that others can have an 
accurate measuring rod for observations on 
the sun. 

It is hard for the amateur astronomer to 
understand why the scientific man seems so 
scornful of the moon and the planets, and can 
seldom tell offhand over the telephone "What 
is that star that is so bright about 4 o'clock 
in the morning now?" But when the layman 
gits a mere peek into the fascinating things 
being done by what used to be called "the 
fixed stars" he realizes how tame the planets 
are to one who knows the stars. 

No. 224 is the sixth paper on The Motions 
of the Stars, by Adriaan van Maanen, a bril- 
liant young astronomer who has been at Mt. 
Wilson for ten years and has made a name 
for himself in this field of Proper Motions. 
Leading up as it does to added knowledge on 



the great general problem of the structure 
of our universe, the study of the motions of 
great streams of stars is well worth the pains- 
taking work of measuring photographic plates 
of portions of the sky now being carefully 
photographed night after night in many ob- 
servatories all over the world. 

225-231 are interesting but more elaborate 
papers by noted astronomers, many of whom 
were visitors at the Observatory for the ad- 
vantages it offers for special work. These 
require future and longer articles if their 
content is to be mentioned at all by the ama- 
teur writer. 

Arthur S. King, one of the Observatory's 
most notable physicists, gives in Nos. 232 and 
233 investigations resulting from experiments 
with the electric furnace, a fascinating feature 
of the laboratory on Santa Barbara street. 

The making of accurate scales of magnitude 
by which the stars may be measured and 
classified is one of the most vital and neces- 
sary pieces of work in astronomy. Years of 
labor have been given to testing these scales 
and in selecting stars to be used for compari- 
son. Screens are used which are known to 
cut off certain portions of light and stars are 
compared night after night and their photo- 
graphs measured with newly invented meas- 
uring instruments. Even' the difference in the 
colors of these stars must be accurately com- 
puted and allowance made for it on the pho- 
tographic plate. It is difficult to give any 
clear idea of the work involved in this prob- 
lem. But No. 234 by Frederick H. Seares 
and Milton Humason deals with The Bright- 
ness of the Stars of the North Polar Sequence, 
a sequence of stars arranged in order of their 
brightness and chosen as a scale by which all 
stars can be classified as to magnitude. No. 
235, also by Frederick H. Seares, deals with 
a revision of these magnitudes; and the whole 
subject of magnitudes as worked out by 
astronomers appointed to make a standard 
scale for all astronomical work is embodied 
in a long report to the International Astron- 
omical Union which met in Rome last spring. 

The study of double stars by Paul W. Mer- 
rill; variable stars; the nature and material 
of the stars, by others or by those already 
mentioned on the Observatory staff, and an 
especially interesting paper beginning, "Since 
the time of the Herschels photography and 
spectroscopy have revolutionized the study of 
Nebulae," by Edwin Hubble, whose work on 
the subject of Nebulae is adding to the fame 
of Mt. Wilson Observatory. These are but a 
few of the fascinating papers published by 
the observatory and giving a brief glimpse of 
the work of its astronomers and astrophysicists. 



PASADENA 

"The City 
of Homes 



I^ROM the large estate to the 
small bungalow — where 
scenic beauty, an ideal climate 
and wonderful boulevards, com- 
bined with a progressive gov- 
ernment, educational and rec- 
reational advantages, and well- 
managed light and power and 
water utilities, make life worth 
living. 



Orange Qrove Avenue, 
One of the Beautiful 
Streets for Which 
Pasadena is Noted 




CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



21 



CALIFORNIA 
HOMES AND 



pit 



9e 



GARDENING 
MANUAL 



PLANNING THE HOUSE 
WITH THE ARCHITECTS 

THE small house problem has been solved 
at last! Home builders who want a good 
plan and a beautiful design by a reputable 
architect have only to go to the office of the 
Architectural Club at 818 Santee street, Los 
Angeles, and choose their architect. 





THE CENTER FOR ARCHITECTS. AND THE CLUB 
ROOM WHERE THE SMALL HOUSE PLANS ARE 
NOW SHOWN ON EXHIBITION. THIS DELIGHT- 
FUL BUSINESS BLOCK WAS DESIGNED BY THE 
ARCHITECTS PIERPONT AND WALTER DAVIS, 
FOR EMMETT AND HENRY DAVIS, WHO HAVE 
HERE THE RAPID BLUE PRINT SERVICE AND 
EVERYTHING ARCHITECTS USE IN THE PRO- 
FESSION OF ARCHITECTURE AND BUILDING, 818 
SANTEE STREET, LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA. 



Sumner P. Hunt, President 
A. M. Edelman, Vice-Pres. 
Chas. F. Plummer, Secretary 
Alfred W. Rea, Treasurer 



Directors 

C. E. Noerenberg, 1 Yr. 

D. C. Allison, 2 Yrs. 
Edwin Bergstrom, 3 Yrs. 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER 
The American Institute of Architects 
Office of the President 
701 Laughlin Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
To Mrs. M. Urmy Seares, Editor, December 5th. 111^2. 
California Southland. 

At the last meeting of the Executive Committee of the 
Southern California Chapter of The American Institute 
of Architects, I reported my conversation with you about 
the relationship between your publication and the 
Chapter. 

I was requested by the Committee to write and tell 
you that the Chapter congratulated you on the high 
character of the architectural material which appears in 
your magazine, and to say that they keenly appreciated 
your efforts to educate the public as to the value of good 
architecture and of the best architectural service; also 
to express the hope that you may be successful in keep- 
ing up the standard of your publication. 

It gives me great personal pleasure to be the medium 
through which this message of appreciation is given 
to you. Sincerely yours, 

SUMNER HUNT. 



SPRING-FLOWERING TREES 

<By HELEN DEUSNER, Landscape ^Architect 

I AM SURE that all cf us, seeing now the 
glory of blossom of the fruit trees, wonder 
how we can forego the joy of them, as so 
many of us do, because they lose their leaves 
in winter. To my m'ind these plants which 
change with the seasons give an added beauty 
to the garden, and an effect very different 
from that in the East, because of our lovely 
green background, against which they may be 
displayed in all their beauty. 

Just now our eyes are full of the double- 
flowering peach trees which we see frequently 
in driving about. They are of various shades 
of pink, from the palest to the deepest, and 
the two in combination are most lovely. These 
are varieties which reached us from China via 
Japan, and are planted for ornament, and not 
for fruit; though they occasionally produce 
fruit, it is not of good quality. 

In driving through the country, we have 
seen first the white shimmer of almond bloom, 
then that of the apricot, more frequent in 
most localities, and now the white blossom of 
plum, and the pale pink of our fruiting peach, 
with apple and quince soon to follow. With 
these in our vision, and the fragrance of 
orange blossoms in our nostrils, it is hard 
to believe that Japan in cherry-time can be 
much lovelier. The Japanese cherries, by the 
way, are not often seen here; they apparently 
do not like our hot summers; in the Bay region 
they come nearer to thriving, but are not 
common even there. 

Another argument, incidentally, for the use 
of deciduous trees and shrubs and vines is 
obvious, but seldom realized. Where in the 
world do we need sun in winter, and shade 
in summer as in California! And in grounds 
too small to have one part developed par- 
ticularly for winter, and another for summer 



Financial Strength 



of a community is gauged by the 
strength of its banks. 

Pasadena banks on Dec. 29, 1922, held 
total deposits of over $36,346,000, a 
gain in one year of $6,278,000. 
Not only as a beautiful city with ideal 
climatic conditions but also in growth 
of business and financial stability 
Pasadena appeals to the home seeker. 



PASADENA CLEARING 
HOUSE ASSOCIATION 




"The beautiful is as useful as the 
useful — if not more so." — Victor 
Hugo. 

Barker Bros, offer an assembly of 
furnishings, pictures and art ob- 
jects which will create home set- 
tings of true artistic charm. 



Broadway between 7th and 8th 
Complete Furnishers of Successful 
Homes 

—hi 



22 



CALIFORNIA S O I T H L A X I) 



An Ideal School for Young Women 

Cumnock grfjool 

COLLEGE WORK IN THE FOLLOWING 
COURSES: 
Vocal Interpretation of Literature 
Literary Appreciation Story Telling 
Public Speaking Journalism 
Dramatics Short-Story 
Voice and Diction Dancing 
French Psychology 

Art and Art Appreciation 
An accredited High School and Junior School 
under same management 

HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
200 S. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles 



use, the tree or vine which drops its leaves 
in winter, and is densely clothed in summer, 
is the simple and reasonable and economical 
solution. And the plqeasure that comes from 
yielding to Nature's way of doing things, 
rather than trying to bend her to our whims, 
is so much better and finer that I wonder we 
don't all learn the lesson sooner. 

We are seeing now, too, in profusion, vari- 
ous yellow-flowering trees and shrubs. If a 
tree, it is a fair guess that it is an acacia 
of some species or other. There are numer- 
ous ones; the blossoms differ in shade of yel- 
low, and in size, but they are all feathery 
little yellow balls, many together, which no 
other bloom very much resembles. The earli- 
est bloomer, and perhaps the showiest, is 
Acacia Baileyana, which starts to bloom in 
January, and is now entirely past. Its foli- 
age is a pale bluish grey-green, very finely 
divided, and the tree, when it is out of bloom, 
is not a very handsome one, being straggly, 
and rather dingy in color. Nothing could be 
finer for cutting, however, than the long flow- 
ering branches, and I have seen them used 
most interestingly, dried, in winter boquets. 

Following this in bloom, and now just about 
past, is Acacia Dealbata, with feathery foliage 
and much pale yellow bloom. It makes a 
finer tree, grey-green and shapely, and is 
often used to give light shade near houses. 
It is most highly prized in England, and is 
grown in greenhouses and sold for Christmas 
decoration. Our trees, with their wealth of 
bloom, would seem a veritable gold mine to an 
English florist! Acacia Dealbata would make 
a handsome tree planted in lawns, except that, 
in common with other Acacias, it may get so 
much water as to kill it. 

Acacia latifolia, with larger leaves of a 
brighter green, is in full blossom now. It 
has larger heads of bloom of a very bright 
yellow, scattered up and down the stem. This 
one is a very fast grower, and may be clipped 
back to make a dense bushy tree shrub, as 
has been done at Balboa Park, San Diego, 
where it serves as most useful accents of 
strong green, and is used in profusion. 

And then there is the old standby Acacia 
floribunda, whose foliage is lighter both in 
color and form, and whose bloom is paler and 
more spray-like, and serves charmingly in 
boquets. One excellent point about this spe- 
cies is that it is scattered with bloom almost 
all of the time. It grows very fast, and may 
be trained either as tree or shrub. These two 
last named Acacias may well serve, in com- 
bination, as a very inexpensive background or 
boundary planting. I know of one planting 
of these two species where the plants grew 
eight to ten feet in the first season, and this 
with no summer irrigation until September. 

Another striking plant now in bloom is Gen- 
ista fragrans, with grass-green small leaves, 
and yellow pea-shaped flowers with a deli- 
cate fragrance. It has a rather long bloom- 
ing period, and is a lower-growing, more com- 
pact shrub than Genista Canariensis, which it 
resembles, and is almost always preferable 
to it. 

There is another dainty Genista, which 
blooms in early April, which is not much 
known, and is well worth planting, tucked in 
among stronger growers, for the delicious 
fragrance of its white flowers, growing in 
long graceful sprays, on branches nearly leaf- 
less. Its name is Genista monosperma. 

Another yellow-flowering shrub now in full 
bloom, and very beautiful is Coronilla glauca. 
It is as neat and gay as you could wish, — 
greyish leaves, and a little coronel of yellow 
pea-flowers an inch and a half across, pleas- 
antly fragrant. With a very little judicious 
pruning it makes a round-headed shrub tree 
of four feet in diameter. 

It is interesting to note how many of the 
early spring flowering shrubs have yellow 
bloom, as though designed to blend with daffo- 
dill and jonquil. Apparently Nature knows 
that yellow is the color of hope and promise, 
the color that stirs and satisfies the "spring 
feeling." 

We can't forbear to mention the Heathers 
which are so beautiful, and have lately gained 
such popularity. We hear them sometimes 
called "Scotch Heather," and invested with 
the romance of the moors and the ballads. 
The truth is that most of thy heathers (Erica) 
we see here come from South Africa, while 
the Scotch Heather (Calluna) is never seen 
here. The showiest one, which we all admire, 
is Erica melanthera, which will grow in a 
veritable small tree if permitted. As it is 



advisable, in most situations, to keep it within 
bounds, it is well to give oneself the treat 
of cutting it lavishly for the house, when it is 
in bloom, and thereby pruning it. Of the other 
varieties, E. persoluta alba and rosea are 
lower-growing and even daintier in flower, and 
almost equally desirable. In other parts of 
the world, Ericas are considered very hard to 
grow, so we are especially fortunate in hav- 
ing them thrive here. 




ACACIA BAILEYANA. A MASS OK YELLOW 
BLOOM TO BE SEEN EVERYWHERE. 



BIRDS ■<By THERESA HOMET PATTERSON 

1MJE Western Bird Guide is the only book 
having illustrations in color of the West- 
ern birds. As it is a pocket edition they are 
diminutive in size. 

Dr. Clinton G. Abbott, director of San 
Diego Museum of Natural History, will lec- 
ture at the Southwest Museum, March lxth, 
on "How Birds Show Their Feelings." It is 
hoped to secure him for Pasadena the previous 
evening. He considers the conservation of the 
birds a patriotic duty and is thankful that 
this new land is awake to their value before it 
is too late. The Audobon Society secured 
legislation in that state protecting the insect- 
ivorous and song birds. Laws are of little 
value unless they are enforced, and it requires 
constant vigilance to keep the meadowlark 
from being classed as a game bird. We would 
miss his greeting from every meadow and 
the grain would suffer from the worms. One 
Italian was found with sixty-five song birds 
(for the same purpose the four and twenty 



54720— Wilshi re 79 




FRENCH and ITALIAN ARTS and CRAFTS 

Imported by 
MISS HOLLINGSWORTH BEACH 
Evening Bags. Old Silver, etc. Antiques 
Embroidered Linens Potteries 
630 E. Colorado Street Pasadena, Calif. 

Fair Oaks 6028 



HEWSON STUDIOS 

HANDWOVEN HOMESPUNS For 
Dresses, Skirts, Scarfs, Blankets and Bags 



602 E. Colorado St Pasadena 
Phone: Fair Oaks 6555 




The Stendahl Galleries 

AMBASSADOR HOTEL 

Los Angeles 

Sculpture by 
A. Phemister Proctor 

March 1-31 

Paintings by 
Thomas L. Hunt 

March 1-15 
Jack Wilkinson Smith 

March 15-31 

Etchings by 
Roi Partridge 

March 1-31 

Stendahl Galleries 

Vista del Arroyo, Pasadena 
Paintings by 
Alson S. Clark 
March 1-31 




SARATOGA ORCHARDS FOR SALE 

The orchards of the Santa Clara Valley will soon be in bloom again, and Saratoga will 
celebrate her 24th annual Blossom Festival the latter part of March. From the hills about 
Saratoga the view of the valley is one never to be forgotten and the fragrance of the delicate 
prune blossoms will linger always in your memory. 

For homesite and orchard property in this favored region, apply to 

MRS. CHARLKS C. BELL, Saratoga, Santa Clara County, California 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



23 



black birds). Dr. Abbott shows some fascin- 
ating- pictures of baby owls, and a Virio feed- 
ing her baby in Miss Abbott's closed hand — 
proof that a mother bird knows her babies' 
faces ! 

A White Egret was seen recently like the 
ghost of his murdered race. This is one 
of the birds plentiful forty years ago now so 
rare that Mr. George Willett, author of "Birds 
of the Pacific Slope," has never seen one. How 
many times the story had to be told before 
woman's conscience was aroused. Today it 
takes courage to wear an egret, but there are 
those who have it. In Italy you have a course 
of song birds with your dinner; in France you 
can buy Thrushes, Skylarks and Nightingales 
in market; in England bird lovers are fighting 
the wholesale trapping of birds; it is for Am- 
erica to protect this great national asset. 

The Australian Piping Crow of the Pasa- 
dena aviary colony has been sojourning with 
the movies. She is crowing some and is quite 
up-stagey! She is one of the actors in "The 
Courtship of Miles Standish," and will appear 
on the big ship Mayflower. 

These rare mornings and moonlight nights 
heed the old song and "Listen to the Mocking 
Bird." 

Theresa Homet Patterson. 



Halt's School of Dancing 

Under Personal Instruction of 
Mark C. S. Hall 
Member of the American Society of 
Teachers of Dancing, Organized 1879 
and Vice-President of the California 
Association of Teachers of Dancing 
333 Summit Ave. Pasadena, Calif. 

Phone Colorado 2770 



The 

Gearharts 

ETCHINGS AND 
BLOCK PRINTS 

By Local and Foreign Printmakers 

6 I I South Fair Oaks Ave. 
Near California St. 
PASADENA 
Phone Colorado 4449 




M. R. Ward & Company, Inc. 



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When a lover among the ancients wrote a billet doux, if he 
really put his heart into it, the result looked like a parcels 
post package. With a brass plate, a strip of bark or a block 
of wood as his stationery, it could hardly be otherwise. 

Even if he were an aristocratic Egyptian and could afford 
pspyrus, the very open style of handwriting then in vogue — 
hieroglyphics — made compactness out of the question. 

Compare such clumsy missives with one written on the 
dainty, elegant stationery of the twentieth century. To 
make it a last moment comparison, you should have in mind 
the most recent creation — stationery bearing a pierced, vari- 
colored, embossed monogram. 

It is distinctive and modish. And it is exclusive in Los 
Angeles w ith Brock & Company. 



/ isitors Welcome 



Brock 6 Company 

515 West Seventh Street 

^Between Olive arid Grand 

The IIou.se of Perfect Diamonds 



A book of photographs, sketches, and plans of represent- 
ative California homes designed by your leading archi- 
tects. Price $1.00. Title— "California Homes." 

Address: Ellen Leech 
544 So. El Molino Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 




Clark Vase No. 3 5 



Beautiful Garden Pieces 
in 

Sculptured Terra Cotta 
H 

Italian Terra Cotta Co. 

W. H. Robison 
1149 MISSION ROAD 
Opposite County Hospital 
Phone Lincoln 1057 Los Angeles 



PHONES 



820130 
822803 



w 



An office for your 
business at $ 10.00 
per month 



CAMPBELL OFFICE SERVICE 




823-824 LOEWS STATE BUILDING 

BROADWAY AT SEVENTH LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



The... 

RAYMOND 

Opens 
December 28, 1922 

PASADENA 
Southern California 

Walter Raymond, 

Proprietor 




24 



CALIFORNIA SOI I II LAND 



THE FOURTH OF A SERIES OF LESSONS ON PROCESSES IN HANDICRAFT 
—HOW TO MAKE ARCHITECTURAL MODELS -By Elizabeth stines 



ARCHITECTURAL modeling is not a new 
field. Michelangelo considered models of 
such great value that he made one before 
building in order that he might view his de- 
sign in three dimensions. Models were also 
used by the architects of the Renaissance and 
considered by them of great importance in 
studying and presenting designs. There are 
a few remaining models of this period which 
are marvels of skill and patience. 

Well made cardboard models properly used, 
are of unquestionable value to the architect in 
studying and presenting the design for a 
building. A model made to scale and carefully 
detailed in strict accordance with the architect's 
design, will make an honest statement of facts 
which cannot mislead anyone, although he may 
be quite unskilled in architectural treatment. 
The client gets a perfect idea of the building 
which the architect proposes to erect for him 
and approves or disapproves with perfect as- 
surance and thus avoids any ultimate disap- 
pointment. There would be less worry and 
more satisfaction and true understanding if 
the client would demand a model before build- 




ing. 



All models, if perfect and constructed in any 




way approaching a true and artistic manner 
will take time to construct; but such a model 
will always be worth the time and money. 

While the architectural models of the Re- 
naissance were mostly of wood, we have today 
a much less costly and entirely satisfactory 
material for models, cardboard. It is more 
durable and trustworthy than either plaster 
or wood. It becomes impervious to moisture 
and changes of climate, impossible in wood 
for any length of time even if you could work 
wood to such small detail. The construction 



of cardboard models involves no objection- 
able mess, such as is found in using plaster or 
wood and it can be more accurately and 
sharply shaped to all the usual architectural 
details. 

For ordinary use, a medium weight pebble 
surface cardboard is better than the mounted 
water color paper. By cutting each eleva- 
tion separately and mitering the inside edge, a 
true sharp corner can be obtained, and in 
much less time than is employed in using the 
heavier cardboard. 

It is not necessary or advisable to make the 
models at a large scale. One-eighth inch is a 
comparatively large scale except when con- 
structing a building of the more simple type. 
The purpose can be served equally well by 
models of a smaller scale with most of the de- 
tails simply rendered in place of constructing 
it, as is necessary "when working at a larger 
scale. The saving of time and labor effected 
by adopting a small scale is very great, even 
though such features as free standing 
columns and some details that have a very con- 
siderable projection must, of course, be con- 
structed. 

Rendering may be done with pencil, ink, or 
water color. The last medium is probably 
most attractive to the majority and the color 
also adds interest to the model. 

The models may be made as elaborate as de- 
sired, showing trees, plantings, shrubs and 
other features all worked out to scale and in 
appropriate color. Plasterline lends itself 
readily to this work and tempera paints, which 
can be used on the plasterline making any 
color possible. It also gives a nice texture to 
the cardboard where plaster is to be repre- 
sented. 

The construction of the cardboard model re- 
quires no very complicated tools or instru- 
ments, outside the usual drawing instruments, 
a knife, file, a cutting edge, a few perfectly 
true lead weights of different sizes or even 



pieces of marble can be brought into play for 
pressing. There are a number of other tools 
which might play an important part such as 
a vice and small plane — but these arc not 
necessary. The cardboard should always be 
cut on plate glass, as this is the only material 
that will not turn the edge of the knife. All 
the flat pieces when gummed together are 
pressed between plate glass, to give a uniform 
pressure all over. 

Besides providing a most desirable way of 
studying the design of a building, a cardboard 
model makes a strikingly effective way of 
presentation. 

One of the most interesting phases of this 
interesting work is the presentation, upon 
completion of the model, first to the architect 
and then to the client. The architect is see- 
ing his design as it will work out, in three 
dimensions, for the first time. There are many 
architects who cannot visualize a design as 
clearly as the eye can see it in a well-made 
model. The discussion by the architects which 
follows the completion of a model is well worth 
hearing. It is viewed and studied from all 
angles, and it may show the architect, before 




it is too late to remedy it, any real weakness 
in the design, either in compartive propor- 
tions or in the grouping of parts when seen 
from all points of view. These models are also 
valuable for other purposes such as developing 
and critically examining complex and unusual 
roofing problems, whether architectural or 
engineering. 

Modeling is unquestionably the most effective 
means of presentation which can be em- 
ployed. A good architectural model means 
satisfaction and understanding. 



Phone, Colorado 5118 

H. O. CLARKE 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 



829 Earlham Street 



Pasadena, California 




J. H. Woodworth 
and Son 

Designing and Building 
Telephone Fair Oaks 281 

200 E. Colorado Street 
Pasadena : California 



THE BATCHELDER TILES 




We produce Tile for Fireplaces, Fountains, Pave- 
ments, Garden Pots— anything that is appropriately 
made from clay. :: :: :: :: :: 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



25 



THE SMALL HOUSE SERVICE OF THE LOS ANGELES 

ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 



Offices of the Club, 818 Santee Street 



OFFICERS 
Clifford A. Truesdale, Jr., President 
(325 San Fernando Bldg., Los Angeles) 
Lloyd Rally, Vice-President 
1117 Hibernian Bldg., Los Angeles 
Paul W. Penland, Secretary 
Roscoe E. Bowes, Treasurer 



DIRECTORS 
William Lee Woolett 
Pacific Mutual Bldg., Los Angeles 

Donald Wilkinson 
Merchants Bank Bldg., Los Angela 
Walter S. Davis 
West Sixth Street, Los Angeles 



THE committee on Small 
House Service appointed 
by the President of the Ar- 
chitectural Club to make it 
convenient for the public to 
get architect's plans and 
specifications for a small 





NOOTII ELEVATIO 



EAST ELEVATION 






1 ft-: -A-' 1 <- : 




PLOI PI. AM 



ESflGN ■ IFOR ■ A • SMALL ■ HOIUSE ■ TO • COST • i^QOO 



house, is as follows: Mr. 
Sumner Spaulding, Mr. Don- 
ald Parkinson, Mr. Walter 
Davis, Mr. David Witmer, 
Mr. Wm. Staunton, Jr. 

The Committee has ar- 
ranged for a series of com- 
petitions for which members 
of the Architectural Club, 
which includes about three 
hundred and sixty architects 
and architectural draughts- 
men of Los Angeles, will 
draw plans of a small house 
to cost about 5000 dollars. 

The public is hereby in- 
formed that the first competi- 
tion has proved successful. 
The drawings have been 
passed upon by a Committee 
of prominent architects mem- 
bers of the Institute and the 
plans and elevations will be 
published, one each month, 
in this magazine and, per- 
haps, later made into a con- 
venient book or portfolio. 

But anyone interested in 
getting a small house plan 
which has been criticised and 
passed on by the concerted 
architects of the Architec- 
tural Club and the Southern 
California Chapter of the 
American Institute of Archi- 
tects can see all of these 
plans of the first competition 
at once by visiting the libra- 
ry of the Club at the rooms 
in the beautiful building of 
the Rapid Blue Print Com- 
pany, 818 Santee street, on 
Tuesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day evenings. At these times, 
which are thought convenient 
for those occupied during 
the day, the Librarian will 
be on duty and will call to 
the assistance of any client 
choosing and paying for a 
plan, the services of the ar- 
chitect who made the partic- 
ular plan selected. The price 
of the plan and specifica- 
tions thus obtained from the 
best experts in town will be 
only fifty dollars, which will 
go into the Library fund of 
the Club and will be more 
than saved by the avoidance 
of mistakes 

To have a good house, be- 
gin with the architect. It is 
being made easy for clients 
to have a good architect and 
to have a house not only well 
built under the direction of 
an architect but to have a 
house that will always sat- 
isfy whoever lives in it be- 
cause it is right. 

Tastes differ and there are 
styles in California to suit 
every taste. Needs differ, 
and there can be made or 
found in the Small House 
Service plans to suit every 
need. Sites differ and good 
architecture is good only if 
it adapts itself to the en- 
vironment in which it is 
placed and seems natural 
from every point of view. 
Thus there will grow up in 
California a California archi- 
tecture the outcome of the 
best efforts of the state's best 
architects and artists, and 
our hills and valleys will be 
made beautiful by thousands 
of little houses well designed 
and built to live in forever. 



26 



C A L I F <) RS I A SOI T HLA Y D 



TOWN PLANNING 



Continued from Tdge 8 



also be carried into the English classes and made the occasional topic 
of the regular theme. 

From the eighth grade, city planning should be carried on up 
through the four years of high school and college; perhaps not al- 
ways as such but more often in the form of municipal administra- 
tion, citizenship, political economy, sociology, and other related 
studies. Prize essay contests, debates, and commencement programs 
might well be woven around this general subject. Every effort should 
be made to place civic affairs among the every day interests of the 
young citizen. Effort should be bent, not so much toward creating 
a knowledge of the technicalities of city planning as toward the de- 
velopment of the living interest in community matters and a sense of 
the advantages and responsibilities of citizenship. 




THK HOTEL AT OJAI. THE BEAUTIFUL SUBURBAN TOWN WHICH DARES 
TO USE AND PRESERVE ITS TREES. 



Both the education of the adult and the work in the schools may be 
promoted and financed by a lay committee and private subscription; 
by the committee of the organized civic clubs, mentioned above; or 
by the city at large. In any event it should be conducted by a man 
or group of men well grounded in the fundamentals of planning 
and skilled in publicity. In the larger cities, maintaining permanent 
planning departments, education should become a regular function 
of the department. In smaller communities, where these special de- 
partments are economic impossiblities, it may be necessary to em- 
ploy a city planning publicity expert to work with the local interests 
long enough to get the system of education well enough established 
so that it can be conducted locally. Eventually it may be possible to 
obtain state assistance with this work. Frequently the city planner 
who makes the plan for the city is well equipped to render this ser- 
vice and the necessary publicity and educational work can be carried 
along simultaneously with the building of the plan, as a part of the 
planner's general effort. Selling the plan is as much a planner's 
responsibility as making it and arrangements between the city and 
its consultant should be such that, when the planner withdraws, he 
leaves behind him a group of engineers and laymen sufficiently fam- 
iliar with planning ideas and ideals in their local application, not 
only to carry out the plans but to continue the educational efforts as 
outlined above and as begun by the planner. 

These various suggestions for each of the phases of city planning 
education should, of course, he adjusted and supplemented to meet 
local conditions. Frequently, they may be made to overlap effect- 
ively. They should not be regarded as distinct efforts but as two 
efforts closely co-ordinated toward a common end, the greatest wel- 
fare of the community. They are separated because there are two 
distinct types of mind to be dealt with, from each of which we may 
hope to gain different things, each necessary to the common goal. 
By educating the adult, we overcome the fatal opposition of ignor- 
ance and obtain the city plan and sufficient conservative observance 
of it to safeguard the larger interests of the future. In working 
with the embryonic voter, we lay the foundation for a sympathetic 
understanding of the principles of sound city building and large 
community effort. Together, they insure the success of the far- 
sighted city plan. Without them, the best of plans is liable to 
failure in exactly the degree to which the citizen body remains un- 
enlightened. 



ORANGE, A TOWN WITH A CIRCULAR PLAZA ««^&Sfi3?5Si« 



CITY of homes! how often is this appellation applied indiscrim- 
inately by the boosters of various towns and hamlets all over 
our country, and frequently too without due regard to any justifica- 
tion for the claim. However there are in Southern California a num- 
ber of towns and cities in which the surroundings for home life are 
so ideal that they fitly can be described as "Cities of Homes". 

Of such latter class is the charming little city of Orange lying 
some 31 miles south east of Los Angeles and located in the north cen- 
tral part of Orange county. 

Nestling thus in the heart of California's wonderful Valencia 
orange district, with its equable climate, its short distance of fifteen 
miles to the beaches, its splendid schools, its harmonious and pro- 
gressive churches and with 90 per cent of its citizens owning their 
homes, Orange becomes an ideal place for the family life of those 
who seek the best. 

The school svstem is represented by a $300,000 high school plant 
completely equipped, where nearly 600 boys and girls are receiving 
their high school training. The grade schools represent an invest- 
ment of more than $200,000 with 1200 pupils in attendance. The 
church life is progressive, and is represented by practically all of the 
leading religious organizations. 

WALNUT GATHERING 
IN CALIFORNIA 

./// day under the walnut trees 
Mexican men, women and little 

children — 
Bright dots of color on brown earth — 
Bend and gather. 
Ilend and gather. 
All day long the sound of nuts 
Dropped into tall runs; 
A hollow sound at first, and loose. 
Then dull and muffled. 
The loud sound of cans poured into 

sacks. 

And the heater going from tree to tree 
Heating the last nuts down with bamboo 
pole. 

I Undertone of musical voices 
Silent toward afternoon. 



All day long the people pick up nuts. 
All day long, under the cloudless sky, 
The Mexicans bend and gather. 
Bend and gather. 

— Gertrude Wesselhoeft Hoffman. 

Ca rpmter hi , Calif om ia . 



Six miles to the east lies the 160 acre Orange county park where 
great live oaks furnish shelter for the thousands who frequent the 
park during all the summer months. Three miles from the city is 
Hewes Park surrounded by the 600 acre orange and lemon ranch of 
the Hewes Corporation. Two miles further on is the Lemon Heights 
district, from the summit of which may be seen a vast array of 
orange groves separated by boulevards into a great checker-board 
of green and gray, while in the distance is the view of Catalina 
Islands and the Pacific. To the east tower the mountains with their 
promise of cool outings and quiet rest. 

Without a boom and yet consistently, the city of Orange is adding 
to its population family after family, who come to California and seek 
out the quiet refined home life that characterizes the citizenship of 
our southland cities. In 1917 the building permits were only $1-16,000 
while last year they represented the sum of $925,000. In 1922, 133 
attractive bungalow homes were built with 59 residences remodeled 
and 16 additional business houses erected. This prosperity is based 
upon the returns from this $7,000,000 Valencia district where almost 
every ranch is provided with a home place, modern, ornamental and 
ample for family needs. 




FLINTRIDGE PARK. LOOKING OUT OVER THE RESIDENCES NOW RAPIDLY DOTTING THIS EX- 
CLUSIVE RESIDENCE DISTRICT SO FULL OF ALL THAT MAKES LIFE ATTRACTIVE. 



CALIFORNIA SO U T H LA X D 



27 



Pacific-Southwest SAVINGS Bank 

FORMERLY LOS ANGELES TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 

Affiliated in ownership with The First 
National Bank of Los Angeles and the 
First Securities Company 

Serving the Pacific-Southwest through many 
conveniently located branches in Los Angeles and 
in the following California cities: 



Alhambra 
Atascadero 
Carpinteria 
Catalina Island 
El Centro 

Fresno, Fidelity Br. 
Glendale, 

Glendale Ave. Br. 

Brand Blvd. Br. 
Guadalupe 
Hanford 

Huntington Beach 

Huntington Park 

Lemoore 

Lindsay 

Lompoc 

Long Beach 

Long Beach Br. 

Belmont Heights Br. 

Atlantic Avenue Br. 
Los Alamos 
Ocean Park 
Orcutt 



Oxnard 
Pasadena 

Pasadena Br. 

Oak Knoll Br. 

Altadena Br. 
Paso Rob'.es 
Redlands 
San Fernando 
San Luis Obispo 
San Pedro 

Marine Branch 

San Pedro Br. 
Santa Ana 
Santa Barbara 

Commercial of Santa 

Barbara Br. 
Santa Maria 
Santa Monica 
Tulare 
Venice 
Visalia 
Whittier 

Community Branch 
Wilmington 



Harmonizing Profit 
With Safety 

Large profits and strong security do not travel together. 
It is usually, true that to make big gains one must take 
big risks; and, conversely, to insure safety of principal 
one must be content with a moderate return on the in- 
vestment. 

However, it is frequently possible for one who keeps in 
close touch with financial matters to increase his income 
materially without in any way jeopardizing his principal. 

To assist investors in harmonizing profit with safety, and 
obtaining the most attractive returns consistent with 
strong security, is one of the important functions of our 
organization. 

Send for new booklet ''Facts Important to Investors" 

ir 




Government, Municipal and Corporation Bonds 

314 Van Nuys Bldg., Los Angeles — Telephone Pico 787 

Santa Barbara San Francisco Pasadena 

1014 State Street 603 Cal. Commercial Union Bldg. 16 So. Raymond Ave. 
Telephone 494 315 Montgomery St. Fair Oaks 26 



TOLD ON THE TROLLEY % John beachamp 

THE Saturday Evening Post has learned the art of giving the 
people cold facts in an interesting way. Several people were read- 
ing it on the car to Glendora and I glanced at its open page cartoon 
in the lap of my companion of the hour. Floating lazily on the 
surface of a mild ocean a prosperous individual in bathing suit and 
life saver smoked a big cigar, while below him a scrawny swimmer 
blowing bubbles to the fishes sank slowly in the wake of a millstone 
tied about his neck. Too far away to read the print I caught only 
the headline, "Public Debt Mania," which did not explain the cartoon. 
I glanced at the young lady seated beside me to see what she made 
of it. Her eyes had a faraway look and she seemed in a brown study. 
In her trim tailored suit she was a pleasing picture and I recognized 
her as the daughter of an old neighbor who had lately left her a 
goodly fortune, after having taught her how to manage it herself. 
At last she turned toward me with a little smile. "Is it dishonorable, 
then, to own tax-exempt securities?" She sprang the question on me 
and then, fortunately, went right on talking. "My father taught 
me to buy municipal bonds as the best investment for a woman, but 
one doesn't like to be a slacker in peace any more than in war." 

"Tell me what the argument is?" I queried, in order to gain time. 
"Certainly no one holds it dishonorable to help build up the cities 
and develop the West?" 

"Garet Garrett has put it very plainly;" and she reviewed the 
article, continued on page 109-110-113-114, through the big adver- 
tising sheets, "because of the fact that many people are putting their 
money into tax-exempt securities, the federal government is more and 
more being supported by the girls who earn their income and less 
and less by those who live on interest from their bonds. You see," 
she rippled, "the Government didn't intend it that way at all. They 
meant to make the millionaires pay the piper when they framed the 
income tax. But they put it on so thick that the smart millionaires 
just slid out from under, and since the socialists and labor leaders 
are hounding them every time they put their money into big develop- 
ment enterprises they just naturally withdraw their funds from rail- 
roads and such useful necessities and put their money into tax-free 
bonds of states and cities, towns and counties, school districts and 
all the other kinds of districts, and now they don't have to pay any 
taxes at all!" Then she twinkled at me in earnest. "It seems to me," 
she laughed, ' that the joke is on the populists. They are always 
nagging the capitalist and howling for some new pleasure or park, 
or expensive luxury for 'The People' and now that the people have 
issued bonds and bought all these luxuries for themselves the capital- 
ists seem to own the bonds and a mortgage on the town, on the people 
themselves." 

"Suppose the town can't pay?" I queried. "That's it," she explained 
again, referring to her paper. "You can't attach the city hall, and 
what good would that do you? I know a town though that owns an 
oil well," and she looked pensive, "I wonder if that town has issued 
any bonds." 

She was looking out of the window and I turned from her to do 
the same. Across the white wash of a treacherous mountain stream 
men were working to forestall "the snarling wolf that lives in the 
mountains" and prevent his unheralded visits on the farms below. 
"I thought," she began again softly, "that I was doing good work 
with my money when I bought flood control bonds. I didn't do it 
because they are exempt, but because I wanted my money to work 
if I couldn't. But I think I'll put the next bunch into some railroad 
that needs it. I've got enough now for my simple needs and it 
wouldn't matter if it didn't bring in anything for a while. I'm sorriest 
for Cousin Sadie, you know great uncle put all her money into 
railroad stock in the East and now she hasn't any income at all. Lots 
of little people like her, too old to learn a trade, have had almost 
nothing to live on since the government ran the railroads into the 
ground." "Government ownership versus expert individual owner- 
ship," I pondered. "They are the same people," she continued. "Who 
are the same people as what?" I demanded. "In a democracy," an- 
nounced, this wise young lady, "everybody is free and equal to howl 
for his share; and now the people who have never done anything but 
cry for the moon have borrowed the money to drag it down and are 
posing as the equals of the engineers who set the moon in the sky. 
If they only knew enough to employ experts instead of politicians 
we could trust them, but they don't know the difference. They have 
put the screws on their expert servants, the railroads, and have turned 
the money of the nation over to the irresponsible populace to spend, 
and now see the populace fiddle while Rome burns and their taxes 
increase. Do you think we shall ever be fit for Democracy?" Her 
eyes met mine as we rose to leave the car and the look in them was 
that of a lovely saint weeping over the city whose lights had begun 
to twinkle on the plain below. "Better put your money in a trust 
company," I said, "and forget it." But she disappeared, shaking 
her pretty head. 



3. ®H. ftninnson Co. 

SEVENTH AND GRAND 

Whatever is new and interesting in travel, biography, fiction — 
literature in general — is procurable in the Book Section. First Floor 



A HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA — THE SPANISH PERIOD 

By Charles E. Chapman. Illustrated, $4.00 
An authoritative popular history, which presents a vast amount of new 
material, some portions of which have never appeared in print. 
At all bookstores or from 
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 
609 Mission St. San Francisco. Cal. 



The 
Ojai Valley 
Company 

OJAI, CALIF. 




OWNERS 
and 

DEVELOPERS 

of 

RESIDENTIAL 
PROPERTIES 



Two ot the houses built by The Ojai Valley Company 

Designed 'Bv 
(ieorge W ashington Smith 



Charming 
Country 
Homes 

yor Sale 
by the 

Company 




THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 

PRIVATE ESTATE 

Inquires the most thorough study oj the 
many conditions involved. BE SURE 
you secure competent service. 



€1 



jtrettrc 



LANDSCAPE .\ ENGINEER .\ CONTRACTOR 
PASADENA 




Sun kissed 

Ocean washed 
Mountain girded 
Island guarded 



SANTA BARBARA 



It vou like California you will love Santa Barbara 



JOHN D. BURNHAM, Realtor 



Associated with H. G. CH ASK 



1012 State Street 



Phone 69 




Complete 
in Every 
'Detail of 
zJtCodem 
Equipment 



oA Beautiful Ranch 

Eight Hundred Acres 
lying along an ever flow- 
ing mountain stream two 
miles from the town of 
Ojai and adjoining a 
charming wooded park. 



JAMES FARRA 

'with 
NEVIN-REED CO. 

20 Raymond Ave. 
PASADENA, CALIF. 




Interior, Metropolitan Theatre, Lot Angela Wm. Lee IVoolef, ^Architect 



No. 40 APRIL, 1923 20 Cents 

CALIFORNIA'S HOME AND GARDEN MAGAZINE 



C / /. / F R X / ./ SO T TULA X I) 



jniiimmn n in {iiiiuiniii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiinimimir^ 



SOUTHLAND 
CALENDAR 



&iUMiinii[iiiiiiniiiiiiHinnii!iiiii»iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiaiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiui>ri 

Announcements of cxh i hit ion s, fetes, 
converts, club entertainments, etc., for 
the calendar pages arc free of charge and 
should be received in the office of Cali- 
fornia Southland, Pasadena, at least 
two weeks previous to date of issue. No 
corrections can be guaranteed if they are 
received later than that date. 

The public is warned that photog- 
raphers have no authority to arrange for 
sittings, free of charge or otherwise, for 
publication in Southland unless appoint- 
ments have been made especially in tcrit- 
ing bp the Editor. 



California Southland is published monthly at 
Pasadena, California. One dollar and twenty 
cents for six issues, two dollars per year, Ad- 
dresses will be changed as many times as de- 
sired if notice is given before the first of the 
month in which the change is made. 

Entered as second class matter, July 28. 1°19 
at the Post Office at Pasadena, California, 
under act of March 3, 1879. 



Clubs 



"IfALLEY HUNT CLUB: 
™ Sunday evening suppers will be served 
throughout the month at seven o'clock. 
The programs are as follows: 
April 1st— Being Easter Sunday, sup- 
per will be served as usual, but the 
evening entertainment will be omitted. 
April 8th— Mrs. George M. Millard 
will give a talk on "The Evolution 
of the Book and the Romance of Book 
Collecting," illustrated by lantern 
slides made especially for this occa- 
sion. 

April lfith — Miss Doris June Strudle, 
Pianologues and Dramatic Sketcher.* 
April 22nd — -Col. Robert J. Hawes, 
late of the Mexican Army, will give a 
talk on "Mexico, Yesterday, Today, 
and Tomorrow." 

April 29th — Song Recital, Mfai Rutn 
Markell, Soprano. 

Monday Afternoons, Bridge and Mah 
Jongg Teas, April 2 (Easter Monday », 
9th, 16th, 23rd. and 30th. 
Special feature for April, Circus Din- 
ner Dance, Friday, the sixth. 

A NN AN DALE GOLF CLUB: 
" The afternoon bridge and tea parties 
to which Mah Jongg has been added, 
will continue on Wednesday after- 
noons throughout the season. 
The second Friday of each month is 
open day at the club. 

Thursday evening, April 19th, "Milk- 
Maids' Matinee," including an inter- 
esting program, a buffet supper, and 
dancing. 

Thursday evening, April 26th, Mus- 
icale. 

The usual Wednesday and Saturday 
Sweepstakes during April. 

pLINTRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB: 

The dinner dance of the month will 
be given Saturday, April 7th. 
Ladies* Day has been changed from 
Monday to the first Tuesday in every 
month. On every Ladies' Day the 
women golfers from the clubs in the 
Southern California Association will 
be welcome. 

¥ OS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies Days, second Monday of each 
month. 

Music during dinner, followed by 
dancing, every Saturday evening 
during the month. 

Luncheon served from 11:30 to 2 
p. m. on Saturdays. 

Sunday night concerts during month 
twice a month. 

Tea served as requested and tables 
for cards always available. 

ILSHIRE COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies' Days, third Monday of each 
month. 

Dancing 1 every second and fourth 
Saturdays during the month. 
A musical is arranged for each Sun- 
day night in the month. 

IDWICK COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies' Days, fourth Monday in each 
month. 

Tea and informal bridge every after- 
noon. 

Polo, Wednesday and Saturday of 
each week. 

Dancing every Saturday night in the 
month. 

1 OS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB: 

Dinner dances, Tuesday and Friday 
nights of every week. Tuesday night 
informal ; Friday night semi-formal. 
Plunge open to the ladies Tuesday and 
Friday of every week. 

MONTECITO COUNTRY CLUB: 
Provides an 18 hole golf course, two 
concrete and two dirt courts for ten- 
nis, bowls and croquet. 



W 



M 



Non- 
Detonating 



G 



aso 



lin 



e 



do you use it in your car? 

Gasolines explode in two ways. One kind 
explodes instantaneously — detonates. It 
has the effect of a sledge hammer blow. 

It crashes against the piston head, forcing 
the stroke by the single impulse. 

It limits the compression because of its 
tendency to explode prematurely, and thus 
reduces power and efficiency. 

Detonation causes "knocking." You no- 
tice it especially on the hills. It increases 
vibration, thus increasing wear and tear. 

The Prolonged Impulse 

The other kind of explosion — the more 
efficient kind — you get from Union Gaso- 
line. 

It is a prolonged explosion. The impulse 
is progressive and sustained — not crashing 
and instantaneous. 

It thrusts the piston throughout the entire 
stroke. 

So Union Gasoline permits increased 
compression in your motor, for compres- 
sion, as authorities agree, is limited by the 
tendency of gasoline to detonate. And on 
the maximum compression is dependent 
maximum efficiency and power. 



M 



ore 



ower on 



Hilh 



Thus Union Non-Detonating Gasoline 
makes your trucks and cars better hill 
climbers. You find a new "lift." Cars are, 
in fact, pulled up by a steady, sustained im- 
pulse rather than by a series of jerks. 

Likewise you have new speed on the 
level and more snap in the getaway — both 
results of high compression. Tractors, too, 
deliver more power. 

Your cars run more smoothly. They have less 
vibration, for the power impulses are smooth and 
constant — saves wear and tear. 

And you obtain more miles per gallon because 
of increased efficiency. 

So there's a better service from Union Gasoline 
in trucks, tractors and motor cars. 

Union Gasoline is the product of pro- 
gressive refining methods. Its quality is 
governed by exhaustive tests. It is con- 
stantly being improved by the research of 
able chemists who are aided by the very 
finest equipment for studying refining 
processes. 

Union Oil Company 

of California 



ion Gasoline 




Tea is served and informal bridge 
parties arranged as desired. 
A buffet supper is served every Sun- 
day night. 

J^EWPORT HARBOR YACHT CLUB: 
Every member of the club is busy, pol- 
ishing, painting and generally clean- 
ing house in anticipation of Inspection 
and the big "Birthday Party" with 
which the season opens. May li)th. 
This party, with its huge cake and 
ever-increasing candles — now six — is 
always of intense interest to all the 
yachtsmen. 



Art 



rPHE Los Angeles Museum of History, 
Science and Art. Exposition Park, an- 
nounces exhibitions of three artists, as 
follows : 

April 3 to 30. Langdon Kihn's Indian 
Portraits, in color. 

Charles Matthew Crocker, oils. 
Helena Dunlap, oils. 

The Prospectus of the Exhibition of 
Painters and Sculptors of Southern Cali- 
fornia, to be held in the Gallery of Fine 
and Applied Arts, Los Angeles Museum, 
May 4 to 3(1, has been issued and calls 
attention to the ruling "Positively no 
works received at Gallery after April 
26." 

Reception and first view, Friday, 8 to 
11 p. m.. May 3. 

Open to the public daily, 1(1 a. m. to 
4 p. m.. May 4 (Sundays, 2 to 5 p. m., 
Wednesdays, 10 to 12 m. I. 

The Prizes, with conditions, are: 

The Mr. and Mrs. William Preston 
Harrison Prize of $100 in gold will be 
awarded to the best work of art, regard- 
less of subject or medium. To be selected 
by the Jury of Awards. The same artist 
not to be eligible five years in succession 
and not over twice in any event. 

Mrs. Henry E. Huntington Prize. A 
prize of $100 is offered through the Mus- 
eum by Mrs. Henry E. Huntintgon. This 
prize is restricted to artists who have 
not previously received a prize in any ex- 
hibition held in the Museum, and will be 
awarded by the jury to any such artist 
submitting the best work of art, regard- 
less of subject or medium. 

rpHE Southwest Museum, Marmion Way 
and Avenue 46, Los Angeles, an- 
nounces : 

The Archaeology Club of the Southwest 
Museum will meet on April 10th at 8 :(>(> 
o'clock in the evening. The subject for 
discussion will be the "Porno and Hupa 
Indians of California and Southern Ore. 
gon." 

During the month of April IS to May 
1 5 th a Spanish-Colonial Exhibit will he 
held in the Museum. Many of our old 
families will be represented, who will ex 
hibit relics and heirlooms of this early 
Californian period. 

Department of Children Activities, every 
Saturday morning from 10:30 to 12:00, 
including music and interesting talks. 

The Story Telling program for the 
month of April is under the auspices of 
the University of California. 

"DRANGWYN'S etchings are on view at 
the Cannell and Chafiin Galleries un- 
til April 15th. To those who only know 
Frank Brangwyn as a painter and mural 
decorator, those powerful and dramatic 
works will prove a new delight. This is 
the largest exhibition of his prints evei 
reld in this city. 

RACE ALLISON GRIFFITH exhibited 
California and Hawaiian landscapes 
in water colors at the Kanst Galleries 
during March, and a few of these pic- 
tures will remain on display in the gal- 
lery during April and May. 

TTOVSEP PUSHMAN'S latest paintings 
from Paris will be shown at Cannell 
and Challins' Galleries, March 26th to 
April 15th. inclusive. Seeing these splen- 
did canvases, remarkable for their won- 
derful color, one is transported to the 
heart of the Orient, for the artist, of 
Armenian parentage is steeped with the 
Iwauly and mystery of the East. The 
works are Oriental figures and still-lifes 
of various objects d'Art of Persia. India 
and China. His most important picture. 
"The Pritresse de Samarcande," exhib- 
ited at the Paris Salon of 1022, is a mag- 
nificent piece of painting and color, the 
most consummate that has been seen in 
Los Angeles for many a day. 

rpHE Hollywood Chamber of Commerce 
announces a Competition for Design 
of Hollywood Community Emblem : the 
first prize. $100, the second, $35. and the 
third. $15. The competition is for a 
Hollywood community emblem, designed 
to symbolize the spirit of Hollywood and 
bo be used by the community as a mark 
of identity with Hollywood. Inquiries re- 
garding this competition may be addressed 
to the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. 

All drawing submitted must be ad- 
dressed to "Hollywood Community Em- 
blem Competition," care of the Holly- 
wood Chamber of Commerce. Hollywood, 
California, and be delivered at that ad- 
dress bv mail or otherwise before noon of 
May 15th, 1923. 

]Y/|R. and Mrs. F. Carl Smith continued 
their Studio Teas on Thursdays during 
March and will entertain the first and sec- 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



Announcements 

rpHE concluding programs of the Pasa- 
denta Lecture Course are: S. K. Rai- 
cliffe, Special Correspondent of the "Man- 
chester Guardian", April 17, "The Chang- 
ing British Empire. Mme. Pierre Pona- 
fidine, April 24, "My Experiences in So- 
viet Russia. Hugh Walpole, Friday even- 
ing, April 27, at 8:15, "The Realists- 
Bennett, Wells and Galsworthy." 
rpHE Community Art Players of Santa 
Barbara announce the sale of season 
tickets to members of the Community 
Arts Association only for 1923 productions 
as follows: April 2-3, April 20-21, May 
25-26, June 29-311, at the Potter Theater, 
Santa Barbara. 

rpHE new First Mjthodist Episcopal 
Church of Los Angeles is awaiting 
the arrival from New York of three mosaic 
panels, said by artists and critics to estab- 
lish a precedent fcr handling and color. 
The panels, the work of Louis C. Tiffany 
of New York, are eight by seventeen feet 
and interpret, pictorially, the hymn "Te 
Deum Laudamus." 

These art panels, it is said, differ from 
anything yet produced in mosaics in that 
they are executed entirely of iridescent 
glass, which possesses a luminosity and 
radiation previously unknown in mosaics. 
The placing of mosaic panels in a Metho- 
dist Episcopal church is said to be an 
innovation. 

TMPRESSIVE ceremonies marked the un- 
veiling of the tablets in four new 
buildings of Pomona College, Claremont. 
Calif., Saturday, March 24th. The new 
buildings are Mason Hall of Chemistry, 
Crookshank Hall of Zoology, Sumner Hall 
of Administration, and Memorial Training 
Quarters. The program included an ad- 
dress by Henry S. Pritchett, President of 
the Carnegie Foundation, and the address 
after the Corporation dinner was made by 
John Adams, Emeritus Professor of Edu- 
cation, University of London. 
AT a recent meeting of the University 
" Club of Pasadena the following offic- 
ers were elected for ensuing year: Presi- 
dent, Frederick J. Loomis, first vice-pre- 
sident, Robert A. Millikan ; second vice- 
president, Clinton C. Clarke; secretary, 
H. O. Stechhan ; treasurer, Paul Wash- 
burn. These are to serve on the execu- 
tive committee with Dr. W. S. Adams anil 
F. M. Hanchette. 

TJEDLANDS UNIVERSITY is to have 
a fine arts building, two stories in 
height and containing studios and practic- 
ing rooms. The arts building and dormi- 
tory for men are to cost $1,000,000. Nor- 
man F. Marsh is the architect. 





7L £i>d)mtbt anb ^>on 

Established 1869 

IMPORTERS of Old and 
Modern English Silver, 
Sheffield Plate, Old and Mod- 
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387 East Colorado Street 
PASADENA CALIFORNIA 



8 East 48lh Street, New York, N. Y. 



Boston, Mass. 
Newport, R. I. 



Magnolia, Mass. 
Washington, D. C. 



rpHE calendar of the Community Players 
of Pasadena, in the Community Play- 
house, for April is : 

April 9-14, "Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh," by 
Harry James Smith. 



April 23-28, 
tavia Harris. 



'Boy o' Dreams," by Oc- 



rpHE Pacific Coast Polo championship, 
the sanctioned title tournament of the 
American Polo Association, will be held 
March 23 to April 15 at DM Monte. Cali- 
fornia. The entries include Midwick, 
Coronado, Riverside, Santa Barbara, San 
Mateo, 11th Cavalry and Del Monte. 

r)RAMA LEAGUE OF AMERICA. Francis 
Neilson. President. announces the 
thirteenth annual convention will be held 
in Iowa City, April 19, 20, 21. 

rpHE ASSISTANCE LEAGUE announces 
a Fete Champetre, Friday. April 13, 
at Hotel Huntington, Pasadena, unusual 
entertainment will be provided for both 
afternoon and evening, including the new 
Mah Jongg dance. 

rjNOME CLUB OF CALIFORNIA IN- 
STITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. At 
home Thursday afternoon, April the fifth, 
from four until six o'clock. 289 South 
Madison Avenue, Pasadena. 

MUSIC MASS MEETINGS are held every 
Tuesday evening at 7 :30, in the High 
School Auditorium, Pasadena. Directed by 
Arthur Farwell. Mass singing, old songs, 
new songs, and particularly Spanish-Cali- 
fornia songs. New song sheets for all, 
with words and music. 

T^HE Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation of Pasadena announces the 
opening of their new Gymnasium and 
Swimming Pool on April 7. Reception 
10 a. m. to 9 p. m. Classes in gymna- 
sium and the pool 10 a. m. to 12 m. 
Swimming in the afternoon. 

yiOLET ROMER, dance creator and 
pantomimist, and sixty-five of her 
pupils, will present an attractive dance 
production on April 20th at the Pasadena 
High School auditorium, wifth Ado fph 
Tandler as orchestra leader. Mr. Tandier 
will have under his baton four soloists 
from the Philharmonic Orchestra. 

The program will open with the First 
Movement from the Fifth Symphony of 
Beethoven, which will be an inspired in- 
terpretation given symbolically by Miss 
Romer. The program will close with 
Miss Romer's original "Tribute to Shake- 
speare," which includes "Puck," "The 
Unsigned Symphony," "A Shepherd" and 
the "White Peacock." 




THE PEACOCK 
Delicious Food — Daintily Served 
Luncheon — Afternoon Tea 
Dinner 

Dinner Every Night $1.00 
Chicken Dinner Tuesdays and 
Thursdays $1.50 
SPECIAL DINNERS 
30 Garfield Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 
Fair Oaks 179 



<S UICK 

HOWARD MOTOR CO. 

267 W. Colorado St. 

C. S. Brokaw, Res. Mgr. Col. 397 




HERBERT F. BROWN 

Stationery, Books 
And Picture Framing 



190 E. Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 66 



MISS EDMISTON 
CHINA STUDIO 

Lessons in China Painting 
Gifts and Order Work a Specialty 
465 Herkimer St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Phone Colo. 9687 



P I JBLISHER'S NO TICK 
The time has come when California Southland can afford to 
expand its monthly output and increase its influence if it can obtain 
a limited addition to its list of selected and discriminating sub- 
scribers. Friends of the magazine , and acquaintances who have 
hitherto enjoyed occasional sample copies are, therefore, given this 
opportunity to shoiv their concrete appreciation by sending in sub- 
scriptions before the summer vacation. Three hundred of these copies 
have already been assigned. The quality of the magazine will be 
maintained. — $2.00 per year. Make out checks to California South- 
land, Pasadena. California. 

APPEARING on the front cover, is a set of two-color process 
plates of the interior of Grauman's new Metropolitan Theatre. 
This was chosen by the Publisher of this beautiful magazine, as an 
ideal subject, and test of the new process, which is causing quite 
a bit of local comment. 

Always first with the new and latest methods of Photo-Engraving, 
the makers of this set of plates have also made the two plates on 
page 27 showing a scene in Alaska. Time, thought and experiment 
have been given to this two-color process, to make it inexpensive to 
the publisher, and yet tell the story. 

This has been accomplished, and the buyer of color plates, will 
be pleased to know what can be produced by this process. Its use can 
best be applied to landscapes, illustrating books and folders. 

The key plate can be run at the same time as the reading matter, 
thus saving an extra run on the inside. Or, at any time the key 
plate may be used separately. It lends itself to many color schemes. 
Bryan-Brandenburg Co., 232 E. Fourth St. 



Ladies! Save Your Shoes! 
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cr Slipper Protects heel and counter 
from GREASE, SCUFFING and WEAR. 
Easily and quickly adjusted. 

O, / FRENCH 
? utVleS BABY FRENCH 
•J y CUBAN 

STATE STYLE OF HEEL REQUIRED 

$1.50 Per Pair Prepaid 

J. E. F. Distributing Co. 
1101 Garland Bldg., LOS ANGELES, CAL. 




Q "7R Studio's 

kerchiefs are 
"Innumerable of stains 
and splendid dyes 
As are the tiger-moth's 
deep-damask'd wings." 
527 California Terrace. Colo. 3655 



THE 

Eleanor Miller School 
Expression and Music 

PASADENA 
Send for Catalogue 
Phone F. O. 336 251 Oakland Aye. 



Books . . . Toys 

Gulck Stationery Co. 

173 E. COLO. ST., Pasadena 
Fair Oaks 39 

Picture Framing, Artist's Supplies 



MARGARET CRAIG 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Photographs Taken in Your Own 
Home 

610 So. Western Ave., Los Angeles. 
Telephone 56254 



Colonial Candies 

Chocolate Nuts, Fruits and "Chews" 
made by 

LUC1LE KNIGHT 

1044 East Orange Grove Avenue 
Bungalow No. 2 — Phone Colo. 9812 
The Yarn Shop. 386 E. Colorado St. 
Mail Orders Promptly Filled 
Pasadena, California 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




Shown In Our Fashionable Dress Salon 

f U 7^ Fashion Experts 
v^X ^Present simultane- 
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BROADWAY COR. SIXTH 
LOS ANGELES 




This Beautiful Home 

in Altadena, 1550 feet above sea level, above the 
winter fogs, where killing frosts are very rare, 
where the stars are undimmed by city lights, 
where the view on clear days extends from 100 
miles East to 105 miles West, and many miles of 
the shore-line of the Pacific are clearly visible, 
where country life has all city conveniences with- 
out the crowds and noises, is for sale at a reason- 
able figure by the owner. 

PAUL F. JOHNSON 

560 East Colorado Street Pasadena, California 

Fair Oaks 3281 




J. H. Woodworth 
and Son 

Designing and Building 
Telephone Fair Oaks 281 

200 E. Colorado Street 
Pasadena : California 



A book of photographs, sketches, and plans of represent- 
ative California homes designed by your leading archi- 
tects. Price $1.00. Title — "California Homes." 

Address: Ellen Leech 
544 So. El Molino Ave.. Pasadena. Calif. 



Pasadena Corset Shop 

Helen B. Ford 

Corsetiere 
Corsets and Accessories 
Lingerie, Negligees, Robes 

A New and Fascinating Display of Unusually Dainty Hand-made 
Lingerie in Crepe de Chine and Batiste and Trimmed with Hand- 
made Fillet and Baby Irish Lace 



Fair Oaks 3388 



308 East Colorado Street 
Opposite the New First National Bank 



Pasadena, Calif. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



5 



ond Thursdays in April, from two to six 
o'clock, 217 Oakland Avenue, Pasadena. 

lyTRS. W. S. MABEE, President of the 
Wa-Wan Club, will provide the Mus- 
ical program for the meeting of the Cali- 
fornia Art Club, April 7. Artist mem- 
bers are requested to bring un framed 
canvasses, or pictures of any size or des- 
cription to this meeting to be presenteu 
to visiting artist entertainers from time 
to time in recognition and appreciation ot 
their services. 

This has already been decided upon by 
the Club. Also members please call as 
soon as possible at the temporary gallery, 
1027 W. Seventh, for all pictures remain- 
ing there. 

Several well known visiting painters, 
Mr. Carle Blenner, Mr. Arthur Cahili, 
and Mr. A. Phimister Proctor, interna- 
tionally known sculptor, have been in- 
vited as guests of honor. 

/~< ANNELL & CHAFFIN leaned several 
^ portraits to show with the California 
Society of Miniature Painters at the Ebell 
Club during March. There was Push- 
man's large "Pilgrim to Mecca," two can- 
vases by Carle J. Blenner, two by Martin 
Borgord and pastels by Dudley Carpenter 
and Otis Williams of charming children. 

A PRIL 16 to May 5, an exhibition of the 
" water colors of the late F. Hopkinson 
Smith will be held in the galleries of 
Cannell and Chaflin. The subjects are 
mainly canals of Venice and Holland, not- 
able for their picturesque beauty and ease 
of handling. 

AN exhibition of pictorial photography. 

by some of the best known exponents 
of the art, will be shown during April ai 
the Hollywood Woman's Club. 

riLMER WACHTEL will hold an exhi- 
bition at the Kanst Galleries during 
April. 

rpHE exhibition of paintings by American 
artists, most of them Los Angeles 
men will be continued in the gallery as- 
signed them in the new Metropolitan 
theater. There are about thirty canvasses 
loaned by Earl Stendahl from his collec- 
tion and when these are removed others 
will be supplied, either by other picture 
dealers or from the studios of the ar- 
tists. 

npWO new galleries for the exhibition and 
sale of California paintings will be 
opened in Los Angeles in the near future. 
/~<EORGE E. HALL, who returned from 
^ Paris two years ago has located per- 
manently in Los Angeles. 
A ARON KILPATRICK has returned from 
" a three months painting tour in the 
vicinity of Capistrano. 

rpHE building fund of the California Art 
Club is steadily growing, much interest 
having been shown in the movement of 
this organization for its own club house 
and gallery. 

pAUL LAURITZ leaves soon for an 
extended trip through upper Califor- 
nia, Oregon and Washington. 
CEYMOUR THOMAS exhibited his re- 
^ centlv completed portrait of Dr. Nor- 
man Bridge at his studio at La Crescenta 
the third Sunday in February and the 
first Sunday in March. The portrait is to 
hang on one of the walls of the California 
Institute of Technology. 

rjIHE West Coast Arts, Incorporated, 
closed the midwinter exhibition at the 
Franklin Galleries, Hollywood, the last of 
March. The collection, with probablv a 
few changes, will be shown at the Ma •- 
Dowell Club, Tajo Bldg., Los Angeles, in 
April, and in the art gallery of the Pubi 
lie Library, Long Beach, during May. 

The officers of the West Coast Arts, 
Inc., are as follows : President, Ella Hotel- 
ling Tanberg; first vice-president, Ella 
Shepard Bush ; second, Lillian Prost Fer- 
guson ; secretary, Helen Beatrice Slutz ; 
treasurer, Beulah May. 

Tt/IARINE etchings by James Dune?'. 

Gleason, together with etchings by 
Modern French, English and American 
masters will be shown in the Print Room 
at Cannell and Chaffin's during the month 

T OUIS " HOVEY SHARP will exhibit 
paintings at the Kanst Galleries, Los 
Angeles, during April. 

ly/TAY GEARHART and Edna Gearhart 
- 1 " will address the Ebell Club on April 
IX, their subjects being "Art in the Pub- 
lic Schools of Los Angeles" and "The 
Revival of Print Making." Mav Gearhart 
and Frances Gearhart will hold an exhi- 
bition of wood block prints and color 
etchings at the MacDowell Club. Tajo 
Building, through April. They will also 
show at the Ebell Club. 

HPHE plans of the Laguna Beach Art 
Association include five exhibitions 
for the coming year, all to be held in the 
association's gallery at 'Laguna Beach. 
The spring exhibit opens April 2, to 
continue to June 1. Summer exhibition 
is held from June 1 to August 1, Fourth 
anniversary exhibit, August 1 to October 
1. Autumn show, October 1 to January 
1, 1924. Winter, January 1 to April 1, 
1924. 

The Laguna Beach Art Association was 
organized in August, 1918, with ISO char- 
ter members, and it is open to member- 
ship to all interested in art and its de- 
velopment. The membership is now 600. 





Italian Cabinet Adapted to Phonograph 



Marshall Laird 



Specializing in the reproduction 
of the finer 
Spanish, Italian and English 
Antique Furniture 



WORK SHOP: 

416 East Ninth Street 



LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA 



Nearly 15,000 people visited the gallery 
last year. 

JOHN FROST will exhibit his paintings 
" of the desert at the Stendahl Gal- 
leries, Ambassador Hotel, beginning April 
3, through the 15. This young artist is a 
son of A. B. Frost, famous illustrator, who 
is now living in Pasadena and contributing 
his inimitable drawings to eastern maga- 
zines. 

TJAVID ANTHONY TAUSZKY is paint- 
ing a ha'f-length life size portrait of 
Stephen Atwood Royce, the young son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Wheeler Royce of 
Rrroyo Park, Pasadena. 

T3AYMOND NOTT will exhibit pastels 
at Bernays', 315 West Third Streat, 
Los Angeles, the first half of April. A 
part of the subjects of this exhibition were 
done from his studio windows at Eagle 
Rock. 

THE Richard Millers are returning to 
America in April, after an extended 
stay in Paris, and other cities of the con- 
tinent. 

A. PHIMISTER PROCTER will con- 
tinue his exhibition of sculpture at 
the Stendahl Galleries in the Ambassador. 



M 



US1C 



T^HE April concerts of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra, Los Angeles, Walter Henry 
Rothwell. Conductor, are as follows : 

April 1 — Easter Sunrise Service. Solo- 
ist; Maurine Dyer, Soprano, Hollywood 
Bowl, Hollywood, California. 

April 1 — At 3:00 p. m.. Eleventh Pop- 
ular concert, Soloist, Leon Goldwasser, 
Violinist. Philharmonic Auditorium. 

April 5— At 8:16, Pasadena, High School 
Auditorium. Soloist, Mme. Bertha Fied- 
ler-Svedrofsky, Violinist, Henry Svedrof- 
sky. 

April 6-7 — Thirteenth Symphony Con- 
cert, Philharmonic Auditorium. Friday 
afternoon, 3:00; Saturday evening, 8:15. 

April 9 — At 3 :00 p. m.. San Diego 
School Concert. 

April 9 — At 8:15 p. m.. Sixth Symphony 
Concert, San Diego, Calif. Soloist, Nath- 
alie Boshko, Violinist. 

April 13— At 8:15, Chaffey Union High 
School, Ontario, Calif. 

April 18— At 3:00 p. m., School Concert, 
Santa Ana, Calif. 

April 18 — At 8:15 p. m., Santa Ana, 
Calif. 

April 20-21 — Fourteenth Symphony Con- 
cert, Philharmonic Auditorium. Friday 
afternoon, 3:00; Saturday evening, 8:15. 

rpHE dates and artists of the Philhar- 
monic Artist Courses, presented by L. 
E. Behymer during April are : Edward 
Johnson, tenor, evening of April 3 ; Guio- 
mar Novaes, pianist, afternoon of April 
7 ; and the last event to include the two 
artists, Rosa Raisa, dramatic soprano, 
and G. Rimini, baritone, Tuesday evening, 
April 24. 

Feodor Chaliapin, the Russian singer- 
actor, under the management of L. E. 
Behymer, will return to Los Angeles for 
one recital, Monday evening, May 14. 

^PHE Los Angeles Trio, May MacDonald 



Hope, pianist; Ilya Bronson, 'cellist, 



A 

and Calmon Lubovski, will give the sixth 
concert of the season on May 3, at the 
Ebell Auditorium. 

TIHE dates of the recital programs of 
A the Wa-Wan Club, held at the Gamut 
Club House, for April are April 12, ana 

26. 

rilHE De Lara Grand Opera Company has 
announced the presentation of "II 
Trovatore" in Pasadena on April 6. and in 
Los Angeles at the Gamut Theater, on 
April 20. 

rpHE fifth annual convention of the Cali- 
fornia Federation of Music Clubs is 
in session at Santa Ana, April 4 to 7. 
One evening will be devoted to California 
composers and artists. 

rpHE Music Committee of the Community 
Arts Association of Santa Barbara 
announces a series of six bi-monthly Or- 
chestra Concerts to be given at Recrea- 
tion Center on Sunday afternoons at 3:30 
o'clock, Roger Clerbois, conductor. 

The dates of the final concerts are April 
8, April 22, May 6. 

An unusual list of delightful soloists 
will appear with the Orchestra including. 
Estelle Heartt Dreyfus, Contralto ; Marie 
Hughes Mcuarrie, Harpist ; Natalia Bosh- 
ko, Violinist ; Dorothy Browfield, Soprano. 
rpHE artist of the final concert of the 
season presented by the Fitzgerald Con- 
cert Direction, Merle Armitage, Manager, 
will be Rosa Ponsell, soprano of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company, appearing 
May 7th. 

rpHE Zoellner Quartet returned to Los 
Angeles after a successful nine weeks' 
concert trip of the East. Forty-six con- 
certs were played on this, their twelfth 
transcontinental tour. 

APPEARING with the Woman's Sym- 
phony Orchestra of Los Angeles as 
soloist in its second concert of the season, 
to be given Wednesday evening. April IK, 
at Philharmonic Auditorium. Olga Steeb, 
eminent pianiste, will be welcomed home 
after a prolonged tour in recital through 
the East and North. 

First presentation here by piano and 
orchestra together will be given Beetho- 
ven's Concerto, G Major. 



C J LI FUR N I A SUU T H L A N I) 



HELEN 
DEUSNER 

j(^a >ni scii pe -Arc hit d 7 

573 South Lake Avenue 
Pasadena, California 
Telephones : 

F. O. 6321 F. O. 2910 



California Southland 



Certified 
Milk 



Particular Milk 
For Particular People 

Arden Dairy Farms 

have produced this high quality 
milk, exclusively, for particular 
families of Los Angeles County 
for sixteen years. 

Distributed by 
CRESCENT CREAMERY CO 



NEVER A 
BETTER TIME 

To Visit One of America's 
Most Famous Mountains 

M T LOWE 

Delightful At All Seasons 
Is Just Now Garbing 
Itself For Spring 



The Pleasant Odor of Woods, 
The Clear, Distinct Vista, 
The Pleasant, Winding Trails 
Insure a Glorious Outing. 



Round Trip from 
Los Angeles $2.50 

PA C I F I C 
ELECTRIC 
RAILWAY 

O. A. Smith 
Passenger Traffic Manager 
Los Angeles 



M. Urmy Seares 
Ellen Leech - 


Editor and Publisher 

- Assistant Editor 


No. 40 


APRIL, 1923 






CONTENTS 



PACK 

Interior ok Grauman's Metropolitan Theatre Cover Design 

(William Lee Woollett, Architect.) 

Golden Yarrow on Ventura Hills Contents Design 

Ramon a Play Music Brainerd Thomas 7 

Ojai Valley and Matilija Canyon in Spring. .Belle Irona Smith 9 

Blue Lupins (Verse) Margaret Rice 10 

In Paris With the Painters Mrs. James A. McBride 10 

CUTHBERT HOMAN'S SAN DlEGO LETTER 11 

The Architect and The Craftsman William Lee Woollett 12 

Southland Opinion 14-15 

The Board of Education. 

Male Armitage on Southland Music. 

The Fight for Public Health. 

Town and Country Club Functions Ellen Leech 16-17 

The First House in Hollywood 18 

The Parks of Los Angeles Martha Nelson McCan 19 

The Cross on Rubidoux (Verse) L. Theresa \'ait 19 

The Mount Wilson Observatory Report 20 

Some Notes on Iris and Tulips Helen Deusner 21 

Books on Birds Theresa Hornet Patterson 22 

Adventures in Beadwork Edna Gearhart 

The Small House Plan of the Los Angeles Architectural 

CLUB M. Urmy Seares 

Pacific Southwest Review Austin O. Martin 

Intimate Corners in a Home Margaret Craig 

The Money Market Leslie B. Henry 



24 

.23 
24 
25 
26 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND is published monthly at Pasadena, Cal. 

One dollar and twenty cents for six issues, two dollars for twelve 
For extra copies or back 7iumbers call Main U08U, L. A. News Co. 

Copyrighted. 1»23. by M. Urmv Seares 

ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT .AND RATES 
For Pasadena advertising call Colorado 7095 
For Los Angeles advertising call 820130 
or address California Southland, Advertising Manager, 
Pasadena, California. 




The Radio 
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Radio, Electric and 
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History of California 
The American Period 

By Robert G. Cleland 

Is ready and completes our 
history of the state. The first 
volume is 

History of California 
The Spanish Period 

By Charles E. Chapman 
Price $4.00 each 

THL .MACMILLAN CO. 
Publishers, San Francisco 



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travel service bureau 

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Public Sales 



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sizes 5 r » to 1 2, which was the 
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largest U. S. Government shoe 
contractors. 

This shoe is guaranteed one hun- 
dred per cent solid leather, color 
dark tan, bellows tongue, dirt and 
waterproof. The actual value of 
this shoe is $6.00. Owing to this 
tremendous buy we can offer same 
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Send correct size. Pay postman 
on delivery or send money order. 
If shoes are not as represented 
we will cheerfully refund your 
money promptly upon request. 

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Shoe Company 

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CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF NATIONAL INTEREST 



CALIFORNIA SINGING THROUGH THE PLAY OF RAMONA 



By BRAINERD THOMAS 



SAN BUENA VENTURA, whose name is now given to a whole 
county in California, may well be called the country of the 
blessed adventure. Sweetly its hills and valley lie open to the blessed 
sunshine and the soft sea breeze. Soft and rolling are its grass- 
covered slopes embroidered with oaks and sycamores. Along the 
winding roads, firm and well made as the Roman roads of Europe, 
the wild flowers blossom and sparkle with color in low lying meadows, 
and orchards fling their sweetness on the air for many miles. No 
wonder Helen Hunt Jackson chose this lovely country in which to 
place the scene of Ramona, California's beloved novel, now coming 
back into its own through its presentation in dramatic form. Virginia 
Calhoun, dramatist and poet, has lately given glimpses of what is in 
store for those who stay in California to see the play. Through the 
composers who have written the Indian and Spanish play music, she 
now allows us to see what a wonderful production she has been 



when everybody sang. A native Californian herself, she records what 
her mother and others of the generation preceding have told her. 
She has dramatized the time when at dawn, rancho routine began 
with song, and when all social functions and Mission devotions were 
song-filled and inspired; when all persons going to, returning from, 
and during work, sang. By nature and by training everybody played 
guitar, mandolin, violin, flute. State-wide singing was universal, she 
tells us. "Indoors, outdoors, on foot or horseback, in the garden, in 
the fields, going through the valleys, along mountain trails — all the 
time — wherever they were — they sang. If in groups they would nat- 
urally take up the tenor, soprano, bass. If alone, the singer pleased 
himself as to tempo, pitch and quality. But he did always please 
himself and all others who heard him by singing at his work or play 
in California. And the pure, sweet air of California made itself a 
very far-casting radio; for the voices could be heard far away in the 




A FINE EXAMPLE OF THE CALIFORNIA ADOBE IS PRESERVED FOR US IN THIS HACIENDA HOUSE ON THE CAMULUS RANCHO, VENTURA COUNTY. 
IT IS THE PROPERTY OF THE DEL VALLE FAMILY AND IS KNOWN AS RAMONA'S HOME BECAUSE HERE HELEN HUNT JACKSON PLACED THE SCENE 

OF HER NOVEL, RAMONA. 



building up out of the story, the history of California, and the 
glorious setting of Californa's landscape and life. 

Hundreds of people are now privileged to motor through Califor- 
nia's little hidden valleys and along her view-crowned hills. To them 
there comes the joy of life in California and they find it singing in 
their hearts. To express this joy in song is a natural impulse and if 
we know how we would all sing upon the mountain tops, so deeply 
does California inspire to song. 

Although, Ramona play is music-crammed with both entra act, or- 
chestrations and stage music, still it is not ballad drama nor in any 
sense opera. 

It is simply that Virginia Calhoun set herself steadfastly to drama- 
tize one of the outstanding characteristics of the time in California 



valleys as the singers followed the trails. Dwellers in little cabins 
perched like dove-cotes high on the mountain side were entertained by 
the sweet singers passing through the valleys below." 

There are probably many residents of this State still who well 
remember those great singing days of California. It is to perpetuate 
this historic fact in California drama that this play is so filled with 
music. Ramona drama is the first American play to put singing Cali- 
fornia upon the stage, not as opera or ballad drama, but as human 
beings singing as they go through life. 

As a thorough student of California's historic past, Miss Calhoun 
finds appropriate matter in the very name of California, derived from 
the Greek word meaning beautiful bird. Not the least of our inher- 
itance from Spain lies in the literary fame given our state before it 



s 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



was discovered. And ever since its discovery 
it has been the home of troubadours and poets, 
and has bade them sing. California itself 
sings. "Its twilight of evening and of morn- 
ing, its deep night and its day dawning ever 
resound with the sweet song of God's own 
choristers, the nightingale, the mocking bird, 
the lark, the thrush. And who shall say that 
even the sweet, minor call of the dove is not 
a song, calling with love, perhaps, or some joy 
we may not know?" To forget these singers 
of dawn and evening would be to leave out the 
very soul of California from her dramatic ex- 
pression — to leave an unpardonable silence 
where there is ever song." 

Ramona drama's tonal atmosphere and 
musical illumination calls for Spanish-Colo- 
nial, Indian, and a thrust-in here and there of 
American pioneer music. 

And so it is that the drama of Ramona be- 
gins with the Indian singing his love song as 




MADAM MANUELA BUDROW. LOVELY CASTIL- 
IAN CONCERTIST AND COMPOSER. CONTRIB- 
UTES SPANISH SERENADE AND SUNRISE HYMN 
TO RAMONA. 



he comes from the hills before dawn. As the 
cheeping, singing birds begin their matin 
chorus, given by unseen, trained whistlers be- 
hind the scene?, he sings a native lyric adapted 
and composed by Arthur Farwell. 

Then as the; night goes and thj sunlight 
11 )ods the place the whale ranch) awakes, sing- 
ing its sunrise hymn. In this case the song is 
found in the novel, Ramona, and the music is 
especially written by th:it lovely Castilian, 
Madame Manuela Budrow now living in Cali- 
fornia. 

The names of the composers wh> have con- 
tributed original numbers from these early 
days in California at once challenge the atten- 
tion of the music-loving public. And this is 
true not only because of their work used in 
this play and for the most part written espe- 
cially for it; but because of their important 
part in the creation of an enduring, original, 
American music that deserves to be ranked 
with the music of all time. 

Ramona play music is contributed by Mrs. 
Anita Baldwin, Arthur Farwell, Madame Man- 




MRS, ANITA BALDWIN, WHO WROTE THE MUS- 
ICAL SCORE FOR OMAR. CONTRIBUTES NINE 
ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS. WORDS AND MUSIC 
TO RAMONA DRAMA. 

uela Budrow, and Charles Wakefield Cadman. 
Resides her original contributions of Spanish- 
Colonial and Indian love song, Spring song, 
corn-grinding, and Indian ceremonial music, 
Anita Baldwin will work out the general mu- 
sical scheme of the play. As a native Cali- 
fornian, Mrs. Baldwin has the gift of song and 
an instinctive knowledge of the spirit of the 
place. Inheriting wide interests and the abil- 
ity to administer them, throughout her work 
in far-reaching philanthropies and service to 
her country during the war, she has, never- 
theless, given time and trained thought to the 
art of our time and has not neglected her own 
talents and her musical contributions. 

Inspiration she has in the setting of her 
home, Anoakia, near Arcadia, California. But 




ARTHUR FARWELL. DEAN OF AMERICAN COM- 
POSERS FROM ORIGINAL AMERICAN INDIAN 
THEMES. CONTRIBUTES SOME OF HIS GREATEST 
INDIAN COMPOSITIONS TO RAMONA. 



the handsome working library and the Indian 
hall full of ceremonial and art objects speak 
far more definitely of her interests; and the 
appreciation which inspired the Indian murals 
by Maynard Dixon has surrounded this daugh- 
ter of California with those vital things which 
make possible our development of art on this 
coast. She is the only composer to have used 
the Flute Dancer's ceremony as a musical 
theme, and has lately elaborated this and had 
it orchestrated for The Play of Ramona, in 
whose last scene is enacted this ceremonial, as 
the wild mountain Indians bid farewell to 
their sweet water springs and, crowded back 
into the higher meadows, ask as they go to be 
guided by the Great Spirit to other waters 
hidden in the earth. 

This composition of Mrs. Baldwin's is strik- 
ing demonstration of what Arthur Farwell 
has said regarding Indian music. ". . . We da 
not need the realization alone of Indian music 
as an evolutionizing force in our own music to 
make us value it, for true Indian music we ac- 
cept because of its own appealing beauty. For 
the Indian's music, for the most part, is mu- 
sical illumination of the mystery of his beliefs, 
according to the myths, legends, and traditions 
of the simple, humane feeling of the primal 
man. Their hymns focalize and crystallize for 
us the inmost meaning the Indian racial life. 




CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN. ONE OF AMER- 
ICA'S FOREMOST COMPOSERS, CONTRIBUTES 
TWO ORCHESTRAL NUMBERS FROM HIS 
NOTABLE COMPOSITIONS. 



The ephemeral and incidental details of the 
ceremonial fall away, leaving revealed the true 
inward spirit of Indian life." Mrs. Baldwin's 
Flute Dancer's ceremony especially preserves 
the strong, elemental forces of a music evoked 
through long centuries of time. This it was 
her direct aim to do, strictly avoiding over- 
elaboration of the original Indian theme. 

Although Farwell's Dawn was the prize 
composition at St. Louis Exposition, still could 
it have more sympathetic realization than as 
overture for Ramona drama, which begins with 
the dawn and the Indian love-song, a truly 
reverent psalm of life. And could his Navajo 
War Dance create more appropriate tonal at- 
mosphere than it does here for the savage emo- 
tions of revenge that sway Alessandro's broth- 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



9 



ers at thought of his cold blooded murder? Or 
the theme of his great composition, The Do- 
main of the Hurakan, — for the Indian the 
home of the mighty wind Hurakan that passed 
over the waters and called forth the earth. In 
Ramona drama the majestic harmonies and 
crash of discords sweep over the chaos of the 
great transition period of California Indian, 
Spanish-Colonial and American pioneer and 
reveal the mighty soul of things in immortal 
construction. 

Cadman's compositions, while they carry the 
soul of the Indian with his sublimity and un- 
quenchable sacred fires, play over his work 
with the gay Spanish song and dance which 
are the very vital elements of The Drama of 
Ramona. This American classic, telling the 
story of "California's best loved heroine," has 
made important contribution of historic value, 
both intrinsic and prophetic. 

It is a fact to be remembered that all of the 
private and public relic collections, the show- 
place hacienda-houses, and literature the story 
has inspired, are without fail always presented 
as being connected with Ramona herself. 

Tsianina, the celebrated Indian girl, opera 
star of national and international fame, will 
play the part of Ramona, which she is now 
studying and making intrinsically her own. 
L. E. Behymer, impresario of Los Angeles, 




says: "As Ramona, Tsianina will be the 
theatrical sensation of America." 



TSIANINA 

The Celebrated 
Indian Girl 
National and Internationally 
Known as an Opera Star, 
Who Will Play 
RAMONA 
in 

Virginia Calhoun' s 
Production 



Miss Calhoun 
Is W riter 
of the 
Drama of Ramona 
and 
Sole Owner 
of Its 
Dramatic Rights 



MOTORING AMONG VENTURA'S WILD FLOWERS 



<By BELLE IRMA SMITH 
"Past Pres. S. W. M. Wild Flower Club 



OWING to illness, hiking had been "taboo" for me for over a 
year, but in April my dream of an ideal auto excursion came true 
when another invalid invited me to go tripping with her in her new 
car. 

You know when a man starts off in a car he grips the wheel, sets 



his teeth and "gets there" as quickly as possible. We dawdled along 
at the rate of ten to fifteen miles an hour. Stopped often to admire a 
view or to pick a flower, and, if a new one was growing, on the 
other side of a fence or up a hill, we went after it. We had Santa 
Barbara in mind as our destination, but when we would arrive, 



MATILIJ A POPPTES ONE OF THE MOST ATTRACTIVE WILD FLOWERS OF THE SOUTHERN PART OF CALIFORNIA. NOW ALMOST EXTINCT ALONG 
OUR BOULEVARDS. STRANGERS TO OUR EFFORTS TO PRESERVE IT IN VENTURA COUNTY ARE REQUESTED NOT TO PICK IT UNTIL 1927. 



10 



CALIFORNIA S U U T II LA N D 



the date of our coming home troubled us not at all. 

Our first night was spent in Santa Paula. Someone there sug- 
gested Foster Park, Ojai, Matilija and Wheelers Springs as beauty 
spots. We accepted the suggestion, spent a night at Ojai, the center 
of that lovely fertile valley, the home of the live oak and lupine, and 
two nights and Easter Sunday at Wheelers. Easter was the only day 
Percy, the car, rested under a tree while we hiked up stream and 
over a mountain trail. 

Our next stop was Ventura, then we drove over the Rincon road 
to our destination, which we reached at noon of the seventh day. 
The eighth day the beauty of the Channel City charmed us, and the 
culminating joy of our trip came when we accepted for a day and a 
night the real, old fashioned hospitality of Mrs. Lucy Sexton of 
Goleta, who took us to her mountain camp, Lupicinus Glen, five miles 
up San Marcus Pass. 

Then we came home, stopping for a night in Oxnard. This trip 
was my friend's first introduction to botany and she proved an apt 
pupil. In Foster Park I told her about the climbing nemophilia be- 
ing used in the early days by the California senoritas as a trimming 
for their ball dresses. About an hour later she suddenly asked: 
"What's the name of that flower — Euphemia?" "No, Climbing Nemo- 



philia." "Oh! I knew that it had a 'ph' in it." Another time I 
spoke of "hosackia," and after a while she broke out singing, "Ho- 
sackia, Hosackia, Hosackia is thy name." I asked: "Are you sud- 
denly gone mad?" "Oh, no," she said, "I was just trying to fix that 
name in my mind.' 

We reveled in the wonderful wild flowers; one hundred varieties 
and six ferns are on our list for the trip. Those that stand out most 
vividly are poppies and cream cups in San Fernando Valley; deep 
blue wild lilac in Susanne Pass; wonderful lupines near Santa Paula; 
climbing nemophlia and fern in Foster Park; apple and plum or- 
chards in full bloom in the Ojai; yellow violets and daisies on the way 
to Matilija; ceanothus and Woodland star at Wheelers; pink sand ver- 
bena and yellow primrose on the Rincon; wisteria and roses at Santa 
Barbara; Tree Poppy and Zygadene on San Marcus; acres of the 
flower called "Sunshine," and golden yarrow on the Calabasas hills; 
oak trees in bloom everywhere! 

Three hundred and seventy-five miles of good roads — a road of a 
thousand wonders, comfortable hotels, interesting people, ten days 
of perfect weather. 

It was April. It was California. 




BLUE LUPINES 

% MARGARET RICE 

As if a world of butterflies, 

In myriad hues of blue, 
Hud poised in breathless weariness. 

Ere taking flight anew, — 
With tremulous wings u-quiver, 

Eager to flit away, — 
Blue lupines on a hillside 

Enchant my eyes today. 



The blossoms — light as fairie's breath- 
The stalks — so supple, strong — 

Promise more immortality 
Than many sermons long. 

Oh! lupines blue, if I, like you. 

My destiny fulfill 
And stand so gay and cheerfully 

To brighten up one hill 
Of all the weary steeps of life 

Since spirits live anew — 
Perhaps — when I hare died, a man, 

I'll live — a lupine blue. 

Cla re m out, Calif or u ia . 



THE CI! ARM INO TOWN OK OJAI IS BUILT BY THOSE WHO KNOW HOW AND DELIGHTS THE EYK. 
BOBLAB HOTEL FORMS A PART OK THE MAIN STREET. 



I N PA R I S WITH THE PAINTERS Extracts f ron a Le,ter f rom M,s James mcBride 



IT has been a pleasure to meet some of the 
great French Artists and visit their studios 
each one so entirely unlike the other and each 
so fine in his own way. You will remember I 
am sure what an admirer I have always been 
of Rene Menard, years ago when I knew his 
work only through reproductions and later 
when I saw the originals in the Luxembourg 
and the Petit Palais. You will therefore un- 
derstand what it meant to me to go often to 
his beautiful studio where the walls are hung 
with pastels of his great paintings now scat- 
tered over the country, some of them I am 
glad to say in the United States. He had, I 
believe, a room given him at the Carnegie Ex- 
position in Pittsburg a year or two ago. His 
personality is a very delightful one.he is big 
in every sense, generous and simple as all the 
really great are. He talked to me of his 
methods of work, showed me some traveler's 
sketch books and gave me valuable suggestions 
as to sketching on our proposed trip to Algeria. 
Mme. Menard too was most kind, very sweet 
and charming. She is a meter of M. Auber 
with whom Captain Perigord was associated 
on the French High Commission in Washing- 
ton during the war. They receive on Mondays 
and early in the afternoon, in fact directly 
after luncheon, before other callers come in, 
students from the Beaux Arts, old pupils and 
others bring work for him to criticize. This, 
too, was very interesting to me. 

Aman-Jean was another delightful acquaint- 
ance whose work interests me as it is most 
original; and his technique, which is quite his 
own, is wonderfully adapted to express his 
ideas and feelings. Though these were paint- 
ings in oil I took them to be pastels. Indeed 




"The Light That Fuiled" 
By 

Cartiano Scarpitta 
Who Has Presented to the Museum 

at San Diego 
His Bust of Dr. Edgar L. Heivitt, 
Director of the Museums at Santa Fe 
and at San Diego, California 



the effect was not unlike a pastel of his that I 
remembered having seen in the Petit Palais. 
He was at work on a large decorative canvas 
for the palace of the brother of the Emperor 
of Japan. Knowing my fondness for land- 
scape he took me into his dining room where 
there was a beautiful view of old Paris with 
the dome of the Val de Grace beyond charming 
old roofs. He served on the jury of the Pitts- 
burg Exposition and would like to go to Japan 
and come back by way of California. 

Of numbers of other studios that of M. du 
Gardier would, I am sure, interest you. We 
had seen an exhibition of his water colors of 
the Midi and of Egypt, which had met with 
such success that at the close of the exhibi- 
tion there were scarcely a half djzen left. 
He is a man of fifty, of independent means; 
and they tell us that th.mgh these paintings 
are the result of a lifetime of hard work he 
is so modest that he never had before had an 
exhibition. There were but three oil paint- 
ings. One of these had been bought by the 
state, another was his salon picture of the 
year before. Later Emily and I went t:> his 
studio for tea. Across one side was stretvhed 
a canvas which was to decorate the wall of 
a chateau in the South. Against a background 
of blue sea were branches of trees and white 
peacocks. Opposite the door as we entered 
had been placed a mirror and the impression 
was that of looking far out to sea. He showed 
us portfolios filled with delightful water colors 
made at his villa by the sea or during his 
travels. He was then about tj leave for 
Egypt and we are looking forward to seeing 
the results of his stay there when he returns 
in April. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



11 



OUR MONTHLY LETTER FROM SAN DIEGO 



<By CUTHBERT HOMAN 

'Director of the cArt Galleries 



THE SCIENCE OF MAN 

% MARGARET BARD 

ONE of the most interesting, instructive and 
valuable exhibits to be found anywhere in 
the United States is that in the Science of 
Man Building in the San Diego Museum; in- 
teresting because it is unusual and of a kind 
never attempted before; instructive because 
it places before the people in a graphic form 
the scope of Physical Anthropology — that 
science dealing in a comparative way with 
the physical man and his functions; valuable 
because it is the most complete exhibit of its 
kind in the United States and probably in the 
world and contains some unique exhibits, noth- 
ing of similar nature having been attempted 
in any other country. 

This exhibit occupies four connecting rooms 
and illustrates man's origin in the light of 
modern science, his relations to the rest of the 
animal kingdom and, in a comparative man- 
ner, his life cycle and its variations. 

In the first room is treated the great subject 
of man's evolution from the standpoint of 
Physical Anthropology. On exhibit are ac- 
curate casts of the most important skeletal 
remains of Early Man which have been so 
important in solving the problems of man's 
evolution and which leave no doubt in the 
minds of the scientific world and the intelli- 
gent public, of this principle. Also, two valu- 
able originals of neolithic crania, the only spe- 
cimens of their kind on this continent, are 
here; one being particularly precious as it 
shows ancient trephining in neolithic time. 

Illustrating to the public these ancient types 
of man a little better than skeletal remains do, 
are ten artistic busts of man at different 
stages of his evolution. The busts were built 
up on the casts of the actual skeletal remains, 
and the various utensils and objects intro- 
duced are exact reproductions of those found 
with the bones. 

The second room deals with man's variation 
after attaining his full development. Sexual 
variation in bones is found between the normal 
men and women of any human group and is 
here shown. Groupal variation is extensive 
and important and is most observed and 
marked between the main races and subraces. 
This is illustrated in charts and twenty large 
busts of sub-races of the black and yellow- 
brown races. Individual variation comprises 
the differences among normal representatives 
of one race. Original facial casts of Eskimo, 
Bushmen, Zulu and Indians show this. 

In the third room is illustrated the indi- 
vidual life course of man by three series of 
true-to-nature busts, showing by definite age- 
stages from birth to the oldest persons that 




BUST OF DR. HEWITT. BY SCARPITTA. 

could be found, and in both sexes, the three 
principal races of this country, white, Indian 
and negro. In a wall-case can be found ex- 
hibits of original bones illustrating the de- 
velopment of the more important bones of the 
body and the skull from the third month. 

The fourth room is devoted to man's pathol- 
ogy and death, which is of medical and surgi- 
cal as well as anthropological value. The 
main diseases of mankind, their geographical 
distribution and the mortality from them are 
shown in charts and maps. Of great interest 
are the bones brought from Peru showing the 
diseases that have existed on this continent 
among the aboriginal tribes before the advent 
of the whites. This is of value, too, for it is 
the last colletcion of bones and skulls from 
Peru, a law having been enacted which pre- 
vents the taking of such things from the coun- 
try. The old operations on the skull or tre- 
panations are illustrated in sixty crania and 
the tools with which the operation was per- 
formed are nearby. 

Completing the building as it is now open 
to the public are two more rooms; one repre- 
senting the beginnings of human culture by 
life-size figures of Indians placed in character- 



istic scenes, as making arrowheads, mining 
iron, carving stones, etc., and miniature habi- 
tations and home scenes of the main types of 
Indian culture in North and South America. 
The other room houses a large South Sea 
Island exhibit giving an accurate idea of the 
culture attained by the people. 

THERE are times when the civic pride of 
the producer of a great work outranks 
that of the one who enjoys, and we are duly 
made to feel our shortcomings in the compar- 
atively few things we do to make our daily 
life more livable and the world more beautiful, 
and to leave to posterity an heritage of our 
belief in our progression. It is as it should be 
— that feeling of realizing there is work to 
do — monuments to be erected: and when we 
see a great artist dreaming, working, creating, 
and then for the pure love of art and pride 
of achievement presenting that brain-child to 
a museum as a monument for the people, then 
do we well to look to our laurels as tradition 
makers. 

Cartaino Scarpitta, mystic, artist, sculptor, 
in presenting to the Museum of San Diego the 
bronze portrait bust of Dr. Edgar L. Hewitt 
lays the cornerstone of art appreciation. It 
means the belief of the artist in the people, 
and as an art center we must not fail. It 
means inspiriation, and the desire to create, 
and the intention to give back that encourage- 
ment in concrete form. 

In the beautiful refectory room of the 
Museum, with the sun sending a beam just 
aslant the pedestal, Signor Scarpitta, with 
the simplicity of greatness presented his great 
gift to the Museum and People of San Diego. 
With but few words the simple ceremony 
marked a turning point — the awakening of a 
new desire to create a mecca for the art-loving 
public. 

As a work of art the bust is satisfying to 
both artist and layman. Incorporating into 
bronze the inner life and soul of the sitter, 
Scarpitta has given us another of his master- 
pieces which means inspiration to the artist. 
As a likeness it is a splendid portrait of Dr. 
Hewitt and worthy a niche in the hearts of 
the people of both the San Diego and Santa Fe 
Museums, of which Dr. Hewitt is director. 

Certainly the act of a master, as Scarpitta 
is, in presenting such a noble gift to the people 
should be to us a strong and irresisible im- 
pulse to fill our museums and galleries; to 
give as we can to the perpetuating of the glory 
and beauty of the age, to encourage and foster 
the art which is well within 'our gates. Even 
should our enthusiasm verge on the hysterical, 
it is better that we become so enthused that 
our very example influence those about us. 

CUTHBERT HOMAN. 



THE ARCHITECT AND THE CRAFTS 



<By WILLIAM LEE WOOLLETT, ARCHITECT 

^Architect of the Interior and Designer of the Decorations -Graumans Metropolitan 




"THEY SHALL NOT PASS" COMMEMORATES 
THE SOLID DEFIANCE OF FRANCE. 



ACCORDING to the dictionary, an artisan 
is one who professes and practices some 
liberal art, or one trained to manual dexterity 
in some mechanism, art or trade; a hand- 
craftsman, a mechanic. 

An architect is not necessarily an artist, in 
the accepted sense of the word. On the con- 
trary, the modern architect has become to his 
profession what the modern college president 
is to the profession of teaching, an advertising 
agent for the college, or university to which 
he is attached. The college or university being 
an organization in which professors, experts 
in various lines contribute their various effi- 
ciencies to the excellence of the whole. 

The business requirements placed upon the 
architects, i. e. direct contact with client and 
contractor, in order properly to carry out his 
commission, the co-ordinating of the business 
phases of a building organization, and the 
"Johnny-on-the-Spot," "look-out man," "early 
bird" co-efficient, are items in the busy archi- 
tect's life which quite absorb the attention. 
In consequence the modern architect "drops 
in" to the drafting room "just for the psycho- 
logies! effect on the boys," gives the models for 
the te. va cotta "the once over," tells his favor- 
ite deocrator to "make a sketch for the ceiling" 
and, if the owner is satisfied, to go ahead 
without further reference to the office. 

The average architect, who boasts a splen- 
did organization, big contracts, and a good 
reputation, necessarily drifts into the position 




ASPIRATION. BOUND TO EAR 
SLOW WEIGHT. DESIGN BY WM 



TH BY SNAIL'S 
. L. WOOLLETT. 



12 



C A LI / U RN 1 A SOUTHLAND 




The Great Fresco in Grau- 
man's Metropolitan Theater, 
Los Angeles 

William Lee Woollett 
Architect for the Interior 

Mr. Edwin Bergstrom, Past- 
President of the Southern 
California Chapter A. I. A. 
is architect for the exterior 
of this skyscraper of which 
only a few of the stories are 
now built. 

In the interior, Mr. Wm. Lee 
Woollett has done a great 
thing for Los Angeles, in set- 
ting craftsmanship on a ped- 
estal with architecture. 

More recognition should he 
given to our crafts in Cali- 
fornia. As an art expression 
they are more useful and 
usable by more people than 
are the arts of painting and 
sculpture. The cultivation of 
the crafts is our greatest 
present need. — M. U. S. 



of relying upon others for skilled craftsman- 
ship. Once upon a time he was, perhaps, a 
famous colorist, a "shark" at heating and 
ventilation, figuring his own construction. 
P=MY over I being his constant compan- 
ion, but now, alas, he must perforce retire 
from the realm of detail. He has experts for 
each department. There is not a man in his 
force but somewhere can outpoint him in 
craftsmanship. 

Thus the architect has become a master 
mechanic, whose brain appraises the value of 
each assistant and uses each and every one 
for the good of the whole. This is the natural 
result of a life too hastily put together. Build- 
ings must be designed, built and become obso- 
lete in much less time than is required to build 
many an ancient edifice of architectural re- 
nown. I think that the cathedral at York was 
in process of building same six hundred years 
or more. This cathedral, in fact, dates from 
the seventh century — it did not begin to as- 
sume its present form until the twelfth cen- 
tury and was not ocmpleted until 1472. 

And so. looking down the centuries, we find 
that in our day the faculty of executive and 
business acumen has come to represent the 
highest attribute of the modern architect. Of 
course, the exception proves the rule and we 
have some eminent architects who are also 




THE WOOD CARVER'S CRAFT CARRIES OUT MK. 
WOOLLETT'S DESIGN IN WOOD. 



excellent craftsmen, but I think we may safely 
say that the average "best architect" in any 
community represents primarily a business 
efficiency, which may or may not be supple- 
mented by a worthy craftsmanship. 

I am making a distinction between business 
efficiency and reaftsmanship for a deliberate 
purpose. One can understand that the ambi- 
tious youth in architecture will, if he has in- 
telligence enough, soon learn that if he is to 
have commissions of his own, he must develop 
the executive and business side of the profes- 
sion. He begins to hold mere craftsmanship 
in disrepute. This commercial aspect and re- 
lation between business success and skill of 
craft, permeates not only the profession of 
architecture, but all the allied arts and crafts. 
Let us take, for instance, the business situa- 
tion which confronts the high class modeler 
or woodearver. I have known many of this 
type. Their employment is irregular as to 
time and compensation. In order to meet the 
requirements of the modern business world, 
it becomes neecssary for them, often, to estab- 
lish some permanent business contract with 
the community. The modeler leaves his be- 
loved modeling to become a contractor for 
plaster work, which combines the crafts of the 
mold maker, the plaster worker and the 
modeler, and the master woodearver degener- 
ates into a manufacturer of furniture, which 
combines the crafts of carpenter, joiner, cabi- 
net maker and carver. 

It is generally conceded by those who have 
made a thoutfhful study of the situation, that 
our skilled artisans are decreasing in number. 
Of course, I do not refer to mechanic arts, such 
as tool making, etc. 

However, the negative aspect of this situa- 
tion is not depressing to the lover of the art 
crafts. There are cycles and cycles. Just at 
present our civilization is discounting the 
handicraft trade in the sense that social posi- 
tion and monetary return are denied the work- 
er of beautiful things by hand. The immediate, 
direct result of this situation is a dearth of 
art craftsmen ; but in its turn, a higher result- 
ing wage is likely to come to pass. Just at 
present we are experiencing the early waves 
of this return. Good woodc-arvers and model- 
ers earn as much as $20.00 a day, at times. 
This increase in pay must inevitably lead us 
to a time when the recipient of such pay is 
respected by his neighbors, as they are not 
now; to a time when the children of these men 
shall be proud to follow the profession of their 
father — not only because it is interesting t"> 
them — but because it is remunerative and a 
reputable calling. 

The artisans of ancient times, particularly 
those of the Gothic age, often formed them- 
selves into guilds or societies. These guilds 
became repositories of the trade secrets and 
trade formulae and it is an interesting thintf 
to endeavor to find out some of these secrets. 
I have the belief that I could tell you some of 
them — one is the rule of three. If you are a 
craftsman, a colorist, an architect, you will 
understand readily that the laws of meta- 
physics and of mathematics are closely related 
and that these in turn must have much to 
do with our ideas of composition. When you 



consider that true textures have three elements 
— that is to say, fabrics have a warp, woof 
and pile. The middle and two ends constitute 
the first grand division of the parts of any 
object. Three values are the basis of true 
compositions in form or color. Three straight 
lines are necessary to the triangle forms. 
Three forces acting at a point are the basis 
of static values. There are three principal 
life forces, the spirit and the mind and the 
body. There are three parts to a cube, from 
the physical standpoint: the top, the bottom 
and the sides. 

Out of these primitive and fundamental 
concepts there accrues a transcendent value 
to the magic number 3, which may seem to 
indicate that my views savor of occultism. 
There is nothing remote from occultism in the 
scientific demonstration of metaphysical facts. 
An artisan who copies blindly, who attempts 
to make beautiful things, but who does not 
investigate and employ the law of psyhcology, 
is not an artisan in the true sense of the word, 
and, again, the realm of mathematics must be 
entered, for there is no understanding of the 
great world of rhythm without a sense of 
mathematical sequences and syncopation and 
of progression. All beauty in art comes back 
finally to the laws of recurrence and laws of 
parallelism, — secrets of the ancient guilds. 




THE CRAFT OF THE IRON WORK IS SHOWN IN 
GRILLS AND LAMPS. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



13 




WILLIAM LEE WOOLLETT ARCHITECT OF THE INTERIOR OF GRAUMAN'S METROPOLITAN THEATER, LOS ANGELES. PAINTING ON THE GREAT FRES- 
CO AT HIS RIGHT ARE PAUL K. MAYS AND STEFFAN HORBACZEK.. THE INTRICATE DESIGN IS FULL OF MEANING AND AS A DECORATION FULFILLS 

ITS DESTINY IN BEAUTY OF COLOR AND BALANCED MASS AND LINE. 



14 



CA I. I F O RX I A SOI T H LA X /) 




To League or Not To League 

BEFORE we can feel ourselves ready to join Europe in 
a League of Nations of the World, we must know our 
own American ideals well enough to stand for them success- 
fully; then, too, we must know European ideals of govern- 
ment better than we have inferred them from the casual 
remarks of immigrants. Before we can be sure of the one 
we needs must question each other as to what are the basic 
principles of American government ; and before we know 
enough about the other to avoid blunders, we must go over 
there and look around a bit in person as our Senator from 
California is doing at this very moment. 

So far, those of us who hesitate to join a League of Na- 
tions have been unable to conceive of any reason for doing 
so other than the old one of uniting for defense. This reason 
does not, of course, apply to the League of Nations, for if all 
nations join it who would there be left to attack it? So 
why have a League? Senator Johnson, arguing from all 
the data he had on hand when he wrote, in January last, an 
article for the New York Times, assumes that as America 
is the upper dog at present, it must be for the benefit of 
Europe that we are urged to join a League of Nations. He 
concludes that since America is not only the upper dog, but 
just about the whole thing in the world today, we can be 
of more service with "our money, our advice, our force," 
if we do not befuddle our young minds with Europe's age- 
old difficulties but maintain "the disinterested position 
which is our principal asset of world helpfulness today." 

Asked to help run the world by co-operation with all the 
other existing nations of the world, we reply, in other words 
— by remarking that we can run it better if we "go it alone." 

According to Senator Johnson, America is not yet sure of 
herself. She is afraid of "being used" by Europe if she 
joins the League. "It is true," he ventures, "we might 
brave the perils ; perhaps the obvious menace we could es- 
cape," but they are sly old dogs over there — and we are still 
a young nation and inexperienced because so far we have 
had all we could do to develop the United States and take 
care of the Europeans who have come to us, and have not 
really studied Europe enough to know what her fussing is 
all about. 

So we are going over there to size things up and complete 
our own education. We are studying to know more of 
facts and less of bluff. By the time we have learned world 
wisdom and can see that as one of the nations of the world 
it is time we took our proper place in the councils of the 
world, perhaps the new diplomacy in which we are as versed 
as is any other nation will have begun to supercede the old. 

Toward the goal of a World Confederacy the times are 
set. He who has not the vision to see it is unfortunate ; 
for if helpfulness to his time is his ambition and he can 
not contribute to so great a goal, the best that his fellow- 
men may say of him and his efforts is "He kept us out of 
the world League until we were grown up enough to take 
a man's place in world affairs. 

Boards of Education 

DR. HENRY S. PRITCHETT while acting President of 
the Carnegie Corporation has recently embodied in 
its annual report a deliberate challenge to our Boards 
of Education throughout the country to put our public 
schools on a wiser foundation both in finance and cui*ri- 
culum. His report has aroused general discussion and is 
especially of interest to Californians at this time. 

Our governor's effort to eliminate waste should receive 
the support of every citizen. He has a difficult task before 
him, and is himself desirous of maintaining efficient public 
schools. But economy does not lie in lopping off a limb 
here and there simply because it uses up sap. The pruning 
of a fruit tree is a science and should be done scientifically 
that the tree may bear better fruit. 

In California the State does not dictate to the local boards 
of education to any great degree — but suggests and re- 
quests certain things in the interest of uniform laws 



throughout the several counties. Great responsibility, 
therefore, rests upon the citizens of any town to see that 
the civic body which controls the destiny of its children 
knows how to give those children the best which can be 
procured for the money avaiiable. Angels might well fear 
to tread this thorny path ! So confused is the whole subject 
of what schools are for, that in the main our public school 
system is now running along with the impetus given it in 
Colonial days but is almost broken down by the load of 
new subjects it has been made to carry. No changes in 
fundamentals seem possible so long as the one idea in the 
minds of the people is that every man's girl and every 
man's boy shall be allowed to get everything that anyone 
else gets; and so long as the qualifications for membership 
on the school board are — a willingness to run, and to see 
that a certain section of the town gets what is coming to it. 

Colonial ideas do still apply to our schools in the minds 
of Americans who know them. But we must take into ac- 
count the great bulk of school children whose parents have 
other ideals, founded, not on knowledge of democratic insti- 
tutions, but on a backstairs knowledge of aristocracy. 
What they think was the education of those whom they 
envied in the old world that they now expect America to 
give to their children ! For does not America see to it that 
every citizen has an equal chance in life? That is what 
they came to America for and the public schools are estab- 
lished to give it to them. The vote of these people out- 
weighs that of the colonials. 

Educators in our great universities, experts submerged 
in theories purely American, reformers of our curricula and 
our methods, may talk and write until dooms day, as they 
have in the past and are today discussing this subject. But 
unless the heavy stolid mass of citizens who vote for school 
bonds and pay school taxes uncomplainingly that their 
children may have everything there is to be had, wake up 
to a different ideal of what a school is for, we shall have 
this class-born notion of educating for position instead of 
for intelligence handed down by generations of public- 
school-trained teachers to public school pupils to the final 
loss of intelligence in the nation. 

Music 

WITH the exclusion of such metropolitan centers as 
Chicago, New York and Boston, no other American 
cities enjoy more music of the first class than do San 
Francisco and Los Angeles. Augment this with musical 
activity of the first order in the smaller cities of the State 
of California, and you have a situation without a parallel. 
Native resources are, musically speaking, unusually rich. 
Artists of international repute call California, their home. 
The back-bone of music, the Symphony Orchestra, around 
which all other musical activity must naturally revolve, is 
more than adequately provided by the Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, whose management, alive to an orchestra's place 
in the community, seeks the musical enlightenment of all 
including the child, and carries the message of music to 
the smaller cities, and even to the villages, of its terri- 
tory. The Los Angeles Chamber Music Society is getting 
under way with a definite program, and its efforts will be 
rewarded as the value and interest of its work is appre- 
ciated. 

The office of L. E. Behymer, for many years the most 
aggressive musical force in Southern California, is now 
supplemented by that of the Fitzgerald Concert Direction, 
bringing new ideas and new artists to an eager public. 
Resident artists have an outlet for their abilities through 
the activities of France Goldwater, and Grace Carrol-Elliott, 
managers of artists. The Zoellner Quartet, one of the best 
known Chamber Music organizations in the country, gives 
a Los Angeles series annually, and visits all representa- 
tive cities in its tours. The Los Angeles Trio, a pioneer 
factor in Chamber Music, flourishes amidst growing musical 
activity and reflects credit on its founder, while Oratorio 
society concerts play to crowded houses, a Woman's Sym- 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



15 




phony Orchestra adds color to the year's music, and such 
organizations as the Lyric Club, the Ellis Club and many 
other musical organizations foster music's cause. The state 
of California supports two Musical Journals of standing, 
one in each of the two major cities, each with a wide in- 
fluence over the entire southwest, and coast. More and 
more are eastern managers and artists looking to Califor- 
nia as a land rich in present, as well as future possibilities. 
The Hollywood Bowl concerts last summer gave something 
to California of lasting musical worth, and served to en- 
hance our musical standing abroad. To give ten weeks of 
Symphony concerts of the highest type, with a major con- 
ductor, and without a deficit at the box-office, speaks defi- 
nitely and proudly for California's musical status. 

All is well with musical progress when such representa- 
tive men as W. A. Clark, Jr., founder of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra of Los Angeles, Allen C. Balch, a big business 
man who is making possible Chamber Music concerts of the 
highest type, J. T. Fitzgerald of the Fitzgerald Music Com- 
pany, bringing great artists to California audiences; have 
the musical future of the community in hand. Add to this 
the energy and ability of such women as Carolina E. Smith, 
manager of the Philharmonic Orchestra, Mrs. J. J. Carter, 
responsible for the idea, and success of the Hollywood 
Bowl Concerts, Mrs. Von KleinSmid and the other club 
women of the southland who have music's interest upper- 
most in mind, and we see musical progress and musical 
interest, democratic and forward looking. 

Merle Armitage, Of the Fitzgerald Concert Direction. 

Something for Fighters to Do 

THE SUBJECT of tuberculosis may hardly appear a fit- 
ting one to hold company with the other articles of 
more cheer, that here find their accustomed place. Yet 
one can not but admit that it has a timely interest, and 
a far keener sympathy down in the hearts of many than 
appears on the surface or in their words. There are, we are 
told, a million sufferers in the United States alone; there 
were over an hundred and fifty thousand deaths from it 
last year; and the yearly monetary loss is counted in bil- 
lions of dollars, in excess of our war debt. The effect of 
this scourge does not end there, but brings suffering, men- 
tal and physical, probably, to a million more of persons 
attached to or dependent on those actually sick. 

The feeling that little could be done in the way of of- 
fering an actual cure, has been so long deep seated in our 
minds that a state of resignation, often apathy, has reigned. 
Yet those qualities are hardly likely to bring success. It is, 
in fact, with a desire to change this state of mind that I 
wr ite — to show something of what must be the future state 
of mind of the world towards tuberculosis — to endeavor 
to change apathy and resignation to effort and enthusiasm. 

First of all, let us give science a little more of our con- 
fidence, for it is doing wonderful things nowadays, of 
which one of the most remarkable is the application of 
Chaulmoogra oil in the treatment of leprosy. After such 
a discovery, in such an hitherto hopeless case, is despair 
longer justified? What science did for leprosy it can do 
for tuberculosis. "Can do," yes, but only if the battle is 
waged with more energy. The layman, it is true, can do 
but little, but that little he must do. He is like the man far 
from the battle line, who does not actually fight, but yet 
must lend his sympathy to obtain success ; he must aid by 
preserving enthusiasm ; he must guide by keeping the task 
constantly before the scientific world. In this case, it is 
a good rule to remember that we get what we demand. 

Now for the scientific world. Tuberculosis is not only 
a problem of the doctors, but of all. The remedy that is be- 
ing sought, will be the product of many minds, and of many 
branches of science. The word for all these branches is to 
be "cooperation." There must be neither selfishness nor 
isolation of effort. Like a well trained army, working in 
harmony, the doctors of medicine, the biologists, the phar- 
macists, the students of the x-rays, all must work in the 



most intimate cooperation. Thus arrayed, their force is 
multiplied many times above individual efforts working 
alone. Then the greatest aid in this battle would be the 
foundation of a clearing house — of an active institution 
where these different scientific minds might meet, and 
work together, where the members of one branch could 
turn to members of another branch to clear up certain 
problems that hinder their progress. It is here that the 
fortunate layman of influence or money can have his great- 
est effect, in guiding the efforts of medical schools and in- 
stitutions of research. He can see to it that they, or some 
of them at least, play to the fullest their role of active 
agents in this battle. There is no doubt in my mind that 
when thus organized and supported by the aroused inter- 
est of these sick and their sympathetic friends, to action 
and effort in proportion to the immensity of the need, that 
the results will justify every dollar spent, every thought 
given, every sacrifice made. That a remedy will be found, 
is absolutely certain. But whether it will be found soon 
enough to benefit those of today, depends in great part, 
how those of today use their opportunities for increasing 
the fighting forces against this terrible — this stupid 
scourge. E. D. P. 

The Singing Voice 

ARTHUR FARWELL is in Pasadena leading the folks in 
singing and setting a pace in community music. Fred- 
erick Ward, whose art is a product of the time when the 
stage set the standard of perfect speech, is in the South- 
land going from place to place, speaking to the people. His 
very presence here is making us mind our p's and q's, and 
practice "prunes and prisms." 

Some one ought to endow a chair of voice culture and 
manners and ask Frederick Ward merely to sit there, get- 
ting up once in a while to talk to us out of his wonderful 
store of knowing how things should be done. 

Then, inspired by California's impulse to sing — taught 
by Mr. Farwell how to express our emotions in music, and 
by Frederick Ward how to use our voices, we should indeed 
be artists worthy to live in California. 

For Arthur Farwell has already caught in the amber of 
his musical output, the primitive emotion of the Middle 
Western immigrant to California's Southland. Those of 
you who have seen two old acquaintances from Grand 
Rapids or Columbus, when, catching sight of each other 
a block apart on a Pasadena thoroughfare, they came to- 
gether with outstretched hands saying, "Well, well, well, 
when did you come out?" will appreciate this folksong 
created out of the Southland atmosphere by the adopted 
composer and sung with gusto at our weekly singing school. 

Four part singers have taken their places in the front 
rows of our High School auditorium ; the leaves of the col- 
lected songs are distributed and paid for by the audience. 
On the stage to help the leader in his heavy lift of the 
baton are pianist, violinist and cello. Spanish songs, full 
of the romance and singing spirit of primal California are 
practiced, and patriotic airs sung with fervor to the best 
music that we have inherited. Then without music or 
words, we stand and sing our own folk song from our 
hearts. "Howdy, Neighbor, how's your health" we greet 
each other with smiling faces and hospitable intent. "Why 
I'm just feeling fine!" Up go our hands in exclamatory 
praise of the weather — our weather in the land of sun- 
shine. "Ain't this weather wonderful?" "Sure, Southern 
Cal. for mine." "Know many people here?" "Not yet." 
The last is said with a sad little shake of the head. Then 
we cheer up and sing: "Let's set a while and jaw." 
"Shake." Everybody in the audience shakes hands. "I'm 
Jones from Indiana, and you?" "Smith from Arkansas." 

All this has been set by the composer to appropriate air 
which admits of conversational effects. 

Perhaps, if Arthur Farwell and Frederick Ward stay 
with us long enough, we may, some day, stop rattling our 
palates in company and speak with the singing voice. 



16 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



TOWN AND COUNTRY CLUB FUNCTIONS 



SPRING SHOWS 
OF THE 
SOUTHLAND 




"CANTON TO-TI", FROM A PAINTING BY ELIZA- 
BETH STRONG. WELL KNOWN ANIMAL PAINTER 
OF FRANCE AND AMERICA. 
OWNED BY MRS. E. TAYLOR HOUGHTON. 




CECELIA DE MILLE ON "BETTY LEE". 

RANTED that "all the world's a stage" 
J upon which all we humans make shows 
of ourselves, it is occasionally a great relief 
to turn to our friends, the horse and the dig, 




to see how well they do it. The horse, with- 
out question, gets decidedly more enjoyment 
out of a show than -the dog; the former seem- 
ing to realize he is on parade, while the latter 
merely endures it with patience for the sake 
of obliging an adored master or mistress and 
he takes it more or less calmly as a part of 
the day's work. The attendant of a dog show 
will immediately take issue with the word 
"calm," as "the peace that breathed o'er Eden" 
seems to be entirely lacking. However, the 
yipping, yowling and yapping is generally 
confined to the show hall, where the dogs are 
in their quarters, as in the show ring their 
demeanor is markedly dignified, aiding and 



the dogs will begin to enjoy them on their own 
account and quite look forward to the event. 
It may be that the dogs, and particularly the 
collies, appreciated the compliment paid them 
in having Albert Payson Terhune, who writes 
so intimately of their virtues, judge their 
merits, point by point. 

The horse, on the contrary, fully under- 
stands the meaning of a show, especially after 
being entered once, and spares no effort to 
secure a good vantage point from which the 
judge cannot fail to be impressed with his 
value and the merits which entitle him to the 




"BRIARDESNE SPEEDY GIRL". THE VALUED 
PROPERTY OK C. W. LEFFINGWELL, JR., OF 
PASADENA. 

abetting the exhibitor to prove their worth 
to the keen-eyed judge. 

If we continue to have shows as successful 
as the recent third annual show of the Crown 
City Kennel Club in Pasadena it is possible 



NATALIE TALMADGE KEATON WITH "BOBBY' 




■■■■ 



GUESTS OF THE SAMARKAND HOTEL, ASSEMBLED FOR A MORNING CANTER OVER THE BEAUTIFUL BRIDLE PATHS OF SANTA BARBARA. REACHING 

.FROM THE MOUNTAINS TO THE SEA. 




CHAMPION. ARROYO ANARCHIST, OWNED BY FREEMAN FORD OF PASA- "GILLIE", WHO LIVES IN COVINA WITH HIS PROUD OWNER MRS F A 

DENA, WHO PROVES EVERY DAY HE IS AN INSURGENT IN NAME ONLY. MONRO; AND HIS SMALL SONS OF WHOM HE IS INORDINATELY PROUD'. 



ribbon of cerulean hue. It is likely he thinks 
the blue is particularly appropriate as he fol- 
lows the roads which wind like blue ribbons in 
and out and up and down, tying our cities, 
towns and communities all into one snug pack- 
age. I did not say "smug" though the temp- 
tation was apparent. 




MRS. W. D. BOWERS, PRESIDENT OF THE BRIDLE 
PATHS AND TRAILS ASSOCIATION OF SANTA 
BARBARA, ON HER ' CHAMPION STOCK HORSE 
BRADY" WITH HER DALMATIAN "SPORT." 



Our Southern California horses are now 
quite accustomed to shows, having appeared 
in three last year, and with the same number 
scheduled for this season. The Santa Barbara 
show in March, followed by the show in Los 
Angeles early in April, attracted entries from 
the entire Pacific Coast and as far east as 
Newport. To Santa Barbara is due the credit 
of reviving the interest in horse shows, their 
first event was held five years ago in an 
oval, palm encircled ring in the grounds of 
the Hotel Belvedere, and the ring is still used, 
though the hotel has since been destroyed. 
Pasadena had the next show, three years ago, 
followed by Los Angeles last year. Under the 
auspices of the Los Angeles Horse Show Asso- 
ciation, the second annual event opened April 
3, continuing through the 7th, in the Horse 
Show Arena on the Ambassador Hotel grounds. 
The management of the show installed a roof 
over the entire arena, eliminating any dis- 
agreeable features coincident with a tent cov- 
ering, and making the boxes comfortable in 
any weather. Each year a certain charity is 
made beneficiary of these events and this year 
the proceeds will go to the Los Angeles Fed- 
eration of Parent-Teachers' Association for 
the Childrens' Milk Fund. 

The entire receipts of the Santa Barbara 
show each year are given to local charities, 
and at no time have the beneficiaries received 
less than two thousand dollars, which proves 
that horse shows are well worth-while for the 



pleasure they give the shut-ins as well as 
the attendants, — to say nothing of the joy 
and prideful thrills afforded the horse. 




WILLIAM CAREY MARBLE, JR., ONE OF THE 
YOUNGER BUT MOST ENTHUSIASTIC MEMBERS 
OF THE FLINTRIDGE RIDING AND HUNT CLUB. 




MEMBERS OF THE FLINTRIDGE RIDING AND HUNT CLUB OF PASADENA, LEAVING THE CLUB HOUSE. TOM LEE, H. ORMSBY PHILLIPS, ROY C. BAILEY, 
JACK FROST, MRS. WILLIAM CARY MARBLE, MR. WILLIAM CARY MARBLE. REV. C. RANKIN BARNES, MRS. C. RANKIN BARNES. MRS. ROBERT LEONARD, 
MR. ROBERT LEONARD, MR. R. MONTALBODI, MR. ROBERT FULLERTON, JR., MR. REGINALD D. JOHNSON, MISS MILDRED LANDRETH, MRS. ALFRED 
WRIGHT, MR. ALFRED WRIGHT, MRS. JOHN MACFARLAND, MR. JOHN MACFARLAND, AND MISS "BABE" LACY. 



18 




CALIFORNIA 

"THE FIRST 
HOUSE IN 
HOLLYWOOD" 

The Community House 
of the 
Assistance League 

5604 De Longpre 

435133 



SOUTHLAND 
■ 



Maud Uageett, hmpto 



THIS is the name used by one in describing the situation of the 
new community house of the Assistance League of Southern 
California. That such a house is needed to bring into close contact 
all the interests of this vital force for good is patent to all who have 
watched the work since its inception. 

Organized by a group of leaders in the philanthropic work of Los 
Angeles and the State of California, vitalized by the splendid ener- 
gies and sound business sense of its President, Mrs. Hancock Ban- 
ning, the Assistance League has set the pace in putting the charit- 
able work of women on a sound and efficient basis. Its main activity 
has always been through its Location Bureau which rents to the 
Moving Picture producers, gardens and homes of members of the 
League and others who are willing to let their houses be used for 
this purpose, under the carefully prepared contract which the League 
requires of the first class firms with whom it deals. 

But, as wisely said by Mrs. D. M. Linnard, of The Children's Train- 
ing School of Pasadena: "It takes all kinds of people to make 
up the world, and some people like to give entertainments and to go 
to them." So the Assistance League adds to its funds for Children's 
Charities by using the talents of such prominent women as Mrs. R. 
D. Shepherd and the young women of her committee, who are now 
planning a novel and gay Fete Champetre in the Garden of Hunt- 
ington Hotel in April. Many fascinating novelties will be there en- 
gaged in. A Mah Jongg Dance is a new one and lends itself to 
delightful possibilities with its dragons, its winds and colorful cos- 
tumes in this perfect setting. At the House in Hollywood the won- 
derful interest aroused in The Thrift Shop of St. Catherine's Guild 
of St. Stevens Church in Hollywood will be carried on in enlarged 
quarters under the inspiring leadership of Mrs. Daniel J. Sully. 







Pictorial 










Photographs 

of 

Calijornia Landscapes 

Hand Colored in Oil 

The KORIN 

KODAK AND ART SHOP 
522 S. Hill St.. Los Angeles, Cal. 










Opposite Pershing Square 





SOME OK THE PEOPLE INTERESTED IN THE FETE CHAMPETRE TO BE 
HELD AT THE HUNTINGTON IN APRIL. LEFT. MRS. ELLIOTT AND 
MRS. SHEPHERD. SEATED, MRS. McADOO. A MEMBER OF THE ASSIST- 
ANCE LEAGUE. AND MRS. McADOO. JR. 

A BOOK OF INTEREST TO CALIFORNIA 

Western Birds. Mrs. Harriet Williams Mvers, in her new book, 

vJwZn 4 MytTS Western Birds, has answered all the ques- 
tions of the tourists as to whether the robin 
in California is just like the one in Boston Commons, and whether 
the bluebird sings (and he doesn't) and does the bobolink venture 
beyond the corn belt! Mrs. Myers not only contrasts western and 
eastern birds, but gives hair-splitting differences between species and 
sub-species. She tells where the birds breed, where they winter, 
the different plumage for change of season of male and female, 
mature and immature, the song, the flight, nest architecture, even 
table manners and courting ways. After all this food for the 
exacting scientist there is delightful after-dinner speaking in the 
way of bird stories, the result of years of keen observation by a 
bird lover. Invariably she calls attention to the distinctive thing 
which identifies the bird, which is invaluable to the amateur student. 
There are fifty-two page illustrations in black and white, the frontis- 
piece being an "at home" — the Anna Hummer in her nest on two 
peaches. The author is a resident of Southern California and is 
engaged in the patriotic work of preserving the birds which are 
a great national asset to any country. — T. H. P. 



3. ®B. ftotnnson Co. 

SEVENTH AND GRAND 

Whatever is new and interesting in travel, biography, fiction — 
literature in general — is procurable in the Book Section. First Floor 




Beautiful Garden Pieces 
in 

Sculptured Terra Cotta 



Italian Terra Cotta Co. 

W. H. Robison 
1149 MISSION ROAD 
Opposite County Hospital 
Phone Lincoln 1057 Los Angeles 



Clark Vase No. 3 5 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



19 



DAWN ON EASTER DAY, RUBIDOUX, RIVERSIDE 



It was yet dark — that darkest hour before 
dawn. 

Just outside the city, vast throngs of people. 

Some came for worship — some curious, 

For on the top of Rubidoux, now a black 

mountain wall, 
Stands the Cross of Light. 

People of all creeds, people of no creed, 
Stumbling over rocks, climbing over hidden 
trails 

With the Cross for a guide-post. 

The birds begin their praise, as in the east 

The first faint streaks of dawn appear. 

Masses of brilliant wild flowers now show 
forth 

As with pilgrim steps morn comes and stanch, 
A gleam of crimson behind the Cross, 
And while we watch the glory moving on 
The mists have rolled away. 

Sweet and clear from the mountain top 
The Easter anthem! — Then such a volume of 
sound — 

The Lord's Prayer repeated by the multitude. 
Behold! The mountain baptized in gold! 
Light of Hope! The Light on Rubidoux! 

— L. Theresa Vail, 

Pasadena, Calif, 




RUBIDOUX, A BARREN HILL NEAR RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA. MADE FAMOUS BY THE JUNIPERO 
SERRA CROSS ON ITS SUMMIT AND THE EXERCISES FOR OUR ALLIES, INSTITUTED BY FRANK MIL- 
LER MASTER OF THE MISSION INN. SERVICE IS HELD THERE AT DAWN ON EASTER DAY 



THE PARKS OF LOS ANGELES 

By Martha Nelson McCan — Chairman, Los Angeles Park Commission 

THE park system of this city comprises a total area of 4741 acres, 
divided into forty-three units as follows: one reservation, one 
raral park, eleven neighborhood parks, twenty-four squares, triangles, 
and plazas, six boulevards and street parkings. 

Griffith Park, a wide stretch of woodland, hill and valley, consists 
of 3751 acres. 

The city covers an area of approximately 366 square miles; the 
miximum length, north and south, being 44 miles, and the maximum 
width, east and west, 29 miles. The park system is spread over this 
area with Brand Park, which is located in front of the old Spanish 
Mission at San Fernando, on the northwest city limits, San Pedro 
Plaza on the south, Media Park at Culver City on the west, and Hol- 
lenbeck Park on the east. The greater portion of Elysian Park and 
al! of Pershing Square and the Plaza are a part of the originl lands 
of the old Pueblo of Los Angeles. 

The Park Department of this City came under organized municipal 
supervision in 1889, when the first Park Commission was appointed. 

The affairs of the department are adminstered by a Board of three 
Commissioners appointed by the Mayor, to serve without salary, for a 
term of four years each. 

The parks offer a varied assortment of recreational facilities: 
boating and canoeing are possible at four park lakes consisting of 
thirty-five acres of water surface; bowling on the green has two 
courts. There is one eighteen-hole golf course, with another eighteen- 
hole course with grass greens and fairways now in course of construc- 
tion. This course will be ready for players to use during the early 
spring; playground apparatus for small children has been placed in 
eight parks and there are eight courts roque; eleven tennis courts; 
two croquet courts, five miles of bridle trails; twenty-five miles of 
scenic drives for automobiles; completely equipped picnic grounds in 
ten parks; automobile camp grounds for tourists and accommoda- 
tions for one hundred cars. The Department maintains a Memorial 
Grove in Elysian Park for the permanent planting of trees in honor 
of those who sacrificed their lives in the World War. In Exposition 
Park there is a States Grove, which was dedicated and set aside for 
the planting of Memorial Tree by various organizations. Exposition 
Park has an extensive rose garden and a seven acre sunken garden 
which affords seasonal displays of flowering plants. The golf course 
and auto camp are self supporting. 

Lincoln Park Conservatory offers a large collection of tropical and 
semi-tropical plants with special displays of foliage and flowering 
plants in various seasons. 

The park system has not expanded in proportion to the growth of 
the city. This is due to the method of financing the department. 
Funds for park purposes are received in the form of a yearly budget 
appropriation from the City Council and the amount allowed, is barely 
sufficient for the maintenance of the various parks. In some of the 
cities of the United States with a population and park system smaller 
than Los Angeles, much larger amounts are received and expended 
each year for the improvement of parks, than is allowed in this city. 
These cities are allowed a tax apportionment for maintenance work, 
while bonds are issued for special improvements of existing parks or 
acquisition of new areas. Los Angeles has not had a bond issue for 
park improvements and we feel that we should be allowed for park 
purposes 8 cents on each $100 of the assessed valuation of the 
city. This would return an amount to the department, each year, 
sufficient to maintain the parks up to the required standard and also 
allow a good sum to be expended for improving and connecting many 
of the parks, so as to provide therein better facilities for the recrea- 
tion and enjoyment of the public. This change in the financing would 
require a change in the present city charter. 




IS 



ONE 



O'CLOCK 



SA Tl'RDA V 



20 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



PASADENA, THE SEAT OF MT. WILSON OBSERVATORY 



Editor's Note — The reviews of the Con- 
tributions From The Mount Wilson Ob- 
servatory, which appeared in the March 
Southland, have aroused so much favorable 
comment that u review of some aspect of the 
scientific work being done o>i Mount Wilson, 
at California Institute of Technology or in 
The Pasudena Hospital and Dispensary will 
appear on this page in each coming issue va- 
ried by scientific notes from other sources. 

In the Annual Report of the Observatory 
for the past year, Dr. George E. Hale, its 
Director, presents in his usual, clear and con- 
cise form, the summary of the year's work 
in science and construction. We have space 
to quote but the first three paragraphs, 
which, however, give an interesting glimpse of 
the scientific man at work. — 



IT IS a satisfaction to report that the ex- 
ceptional progress in research recorded last 
year has shown no sign of abatement. Its 
future continuation, sufficiently assured by the 
productive vigor of the observatDry staff, will 
be further promoted by the establishment of 
close and effective co-operation with the Cali- 
fornia Institute of Technology and by the ini- 
tiation of promising new enterprises, some of 
which involve important additions to our in- 
strumental equipment. In epitomizing the 
year's advances, special mention should be 
made of Seares's researches on the masses of 
the stars and on the progressive changes of 
temperature, diameter, and density that mark 
the course of stellar evolution; the discovery 
by Stnimberg of the identity of the two star- 
streams found by Kapteyn among the A-type 
stars with the Taurus and the Ursa Major 
groups, and of the marked difference in 
stream-motion of the giants and dwarfs of 
the later spectral types; the development by 
Adams and Joy of a spectroscopic method of 
measuring the absolute magnitude (and hence 
the distances) of the white (A) stars, and its 
immediate application to 544 of these objects; 
the theoretical investigations of Russell on the 
nature of dark nebula;; the proof by Hubble 
that the radiation of the nebula; is stimulated 
by stars lying within thi'in; the discovery by 
Nicholson and Pettit that the total radiation 
of certain red variables of the eighth magni- 
tude is as great as that of white stars of the 




PASADENA'S CELEBRATED TREES AT CARMELITA. 

second magnitude; the measurement by Abbot 
of the energy distribution in the spectra of 
certain of the brighter stars and the promise 
this work yields of great advances in this im- 
portant field of investigation; the progress 
made by Michelson in the redetermination of 
the velocity of light and his contributions to 
other important physical problems; the detec- 
tion of invisible sun-spots by their Zeeman 
effect; the important contributions made by 
St. John and Babcock toward the establishment 
of the system of standards of are wave-lengths 
now internationally adopted, their measure- 
ments of solar lines and the continuation of 
their investigations of the causes giving rise 
to the displacements of lines in the sun; the 
proof by Anderson that an electrically ex- 
ploded wire attains a temperature of 20.0J0 
degrees and that its vapor totally absorbs 
light from a brilliant source; and the confir- 
mation by Russell, St. John and King of vari- 
ous predictions based on Saha's ionization 
theory. The last-named work has been done 
in the light of repeated discussions with the 



physicists and chemists of the California In- 
stitute of Technology, and partly in direct co- 
operation with Dr. Noyes. Future possibilities 
have been enlarged by the design of a 50-foot 
interferometer telescope, with independent 
equatorial mounting, already under construc- 
tion, and by the preparation of plans for a 
new physical laboratory, which, if funds for 
its erection can be obtained, will greatly facil- 
itate our laboratory researches. 

But as we record these evidences of prog- 
ress, we are saddened by a heavy loss, keenly 
felt throughout the scientific world. The 
death of Professor Kapteyn on June 18 re- 
moves from us a great and inspiring pioneer, 
to whom astronomy owes, as Eddington has 
said, its first firm footing among the intrica- 
cies of the stellar universe. Before him all 
attempts to make order out of seeming chaos 
had been in vain. Double and multiple star- 
systems, globular clusters, and irregular star- 
groups moving together in space were known. 
But the vast mass of stars had yielded no sign 
of larger relationship and the constitution of 
the Galaxy was a sealed mystery. Kapteyn's 
great discovery of the two star-streams, which 
comprise between them a large proportion of 
all stars whose motions are known, pointed 
the way that many astronomers have since 
pursued with success. His carefully devised 
plan for the intensive study of the stars in 
selected areas of the sky, toward the realiza- 
tion of which observatories in all parts of the 
world have contributed, will be continued, it 
may be hoped, by his friends and collaborators. 
We at Mount Wilson, who have profited great- 
ly by Kapteyn's wide vision and wise counsel, 
and have enjoyed the advantage of his per- 
sonal friendship, shall be glad to do our full 
share toward its completion. 

A different mode of approach to the prob- 
lem of the structure of the universe, pursued 
at Mount Wilson with marked success, is that 
of Dr. Shapley, who has made use for this 
purpose of his photometric studies of the stars 
in globular clusters. His conclusion that the 
galactic system is vastly larger than was for- 
merly supposed, though attacked in some 
quarters, has received substantial support 
from several recent studies. Shapley's ap- 
pointment as director of the Harvard Observ- 
atory deprives us of another able investigator, 
but we shall hope to continue to co-operate 
with him in the study of stellar problems. 




Pasadena Gas Appliance Co. 

Our Expert Estimators 
Can Solve Your Heating Problem 
Exclusively a Gas Appliance Store 
We Carry 

THE CLARK. JEWEL GAS RANGE 
901 East Colorado St.. Pasadena. Calif. 
Fair Oaks 93 



PASADENA 

WINDOW SHADE 
SHOP 

Makers of Exclusive 
WINDOW SHADES 
The Best in Materials and 
Workmanship 
12 Holly Street. Fair Oaks 48 



QUALITY SERVICE 

THE ELITE 

DRY CLEANERS AND DYERS 
Plant: 797 So. Fair Oaks Ave. 
Colo. 1349 Pasadena, Cal. 



J/ie 

CATERERS AND 



{"lite 

V-^CONFECTK )NERS 



prepare the most delectable cool, crisp salads and the 
daintiest, vet altogether the most satisfying of sandwiches. Of 
course, there are the frozen dainties together with the wonder- 
ful French pastries for which the Elite has long been famous. 
Those who prefer hot dinner dishes such as steaks, chops, 
chicken, roast turkey or duck and other meats or fish are served 
daily a la carte from 1 1 :30 a. m. to 1 1 :30 p. m. The Catering 
Department is prepared to serve at your home for all occa- 
sions on short notice any number of people. 

A box of chocolates and B-n Bons or other candies of our own 
make can not fail to give satisfaction 



Elite Delicacy Shop 



629 to 641 SO. FLOWER ST., LOS ANGELES. 
634 E. COLORADO ST., PASADENA. Phone: 



Phone: Pico 1573 
Fair Oaks 40S3 



l 820130 
PHONES - 822803 




823-824 LOEWS STATE BUILDING 

BROADWAY AT SEVENTH LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 



An office for your 
business at $1000 
per month 



CAMPBELL OFFICE SERVICE 



Permutit Soft Water Saves 
Clothes 
TROY LAUNDRY 

In Business for Twenty Years 
Pasadena. Cal. Phone C. 146 

Alhambra 243-J 



WHY NOT HAVE THE BEST? 

American Laundry Co. 

Fair Oaks 514 
501 South Raymond Aye. 



LAUNDERERS DRY CLEANERS 



Royal Laundry Co. 

461 So Raymond Colo. 67 

Pasadena, Calif. 



PASADENA LEATHER GOODS CO. 

Suit Cases. Purses. Bags 
Puttees for Men. Women and Children 
Insured and Guaranteed Trunks 
742 E. Colorado St.. 
Fair Oaks 354 Pasadena 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



21 



CALIFORNIA 
HOMES AND 



■i 

PLANNING THE HOUSE 
WITH THE ARCHITECTS 

THE small house problem has been solved 
at last! Home builders who want a good 
plan and a beautiful design by a reputable 
architect have only to go to the office of the 
Architectural Club at 818 Santee street, Los 
Angeles, and choose their architect's plan. 




GARDENING 
MANUAL 



FIRST FLORR PLAN OF HOUSE BELOW -HUNT 
AND BURNS, ARCHITECTS, LOS ANGELES. 




A CHARMING CALIFORNIA HOUSE HUNT AND BURNS, ARCHITECTS 



A FEW NOTES ON IRIS AND TULIPS 

■By HELEN DEUSNER, Landscape ^Architect 

CALIFORNIA is Paradise for Iris, the com- 
moner kinds have been blooming here for 
some time and soon will come the high tide of 
the Iris season. The fine old "Crimson King" 
— a rich purple — is practically ever blooming 
in Southern California, and our common white 
one is naturalized in many places. 

Iris Stylosa is a midwinter bloomer, and 
ought to be planted more commonly. It is a 
dainty, fragrant, orchid-like flower, of pale 
lavender-blue, on stems a foot or less long, set 
in long grass-like foliage. It is inexpensive, 
and splendid as a cut-flower. 

Another Iris-like bloom we might use more 
is Moraea iridoides, which is a fine flat white 
iris-like bloom on tall stems, blooming inter- 
mittently all through the year. It is not, how- 
ever, good for cutting, as the flowers last only 
a day. There is another Moraea reported in 
California, but which I have not seen, which 
must be remarkable. It is M. Robinsoniana 
and grows from six to eight feet in height, one 
plant, sixteen years from seed, bearing 457 
blooms between June 20th and Oct. 1st. 

Then there are the numerous varieties of 
Bearded (Commonly called German) Iris, 
many inexpensive, and some, newly-developed, 
costing five or ten dollars a bulb, (or properly 
speaking, rhizome). We have nearby a wom- 
an who has grown Iris as a specialty, for 
many years. She is Mrs. Dean and lives in 
Moneta, a village half-way between Los An- 
geles and Long Beach. I always run down to 
her gardens in the Spring to see the Iris in 
bloom, and make notes for next year's plant- 
ing. One of her introductions, "Lady Lou," I 
planted a year and a half ago in one of my 
gardens, it is now blooming, and stands at eye 
level — 59 inches — a stunning sight. 

Some of the varieties I marked last year, 



Tlx 



Financial Strength 



of a community is gauged by the 
strength of its banks. 

Pasadena banks on Dec. 29, 1922, held 
total deposits of over $36,346,000, a 
gain in one year of $6,278,000. 
Not only as a beautiful city with ideal 
climatic conditions but also in growth 
of business and financial stability 
Pasadena appeals to the home seeker. 



PASADENA CLEARING 
HOUSE ASSOCIATION 




is over and gone; 
the time of the sing- 
oice of the turtle is 



f O those planning re-furnishing touches 
1 in key with the joyousness of the 
springtime, Barker Bros, extend a cordial 
invitation to find helpful ideas in the dis- 
plays here. 



Broadway between 7th and 8th 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 



22 



CALIFORNIA 8 O I T 11 L A N D 



which were good for foliage as well as for 
bloom, costing between $2.00 and $5.00 per 
dozen, are: Albert Victor — blue and lavender; 
Isolene — yellow, lilac, purplish old rose; Mau- 
vine — mauve; Lorely- — deep blue — edge cream; 
Princess Victoria Louise — deep violet, white 
edge; Delicatessima — white, frilled, lilac; 
Dalmarius — lilac and silver — orange beard; 
Jaquesiana — copper and maroon; Naushon — 
mauve and pansy-violet. 

I could with small effort, become an Iris en- 
thusiast; they thrive with no care at all, and, 
on the other hand, thrive also in a border re- 
quiring water; their foliage, with a little care, 
is interesting all the time, and gives a note of 
permanence and contract to a border, while 
blending with any flower planting. 

Another great show in our gardens soon will 
be the late-flowering tulips. These "Darwin," 
"Cottage" and "Breeder" Tulips have an inter- 
esting bit of history connected with them. 
For centuries they were almost lost from cul- 
tivation, following the "tulipomania" in Hol- 
land, which began in 1634. Tulips had been 
introduced into Europe less than a century be- 
fore, through seed brought from Turkey by the 
Austrian ambassador. They were then im- 
proved and developed into such beautiful 
specimens that Holland went wild over them. 
For four years the excitement lasted, until the 
Government had to take a hand to end the wild 
speculation, when single bulbs sold for as 
much as six thousand dollars. For two cen- 
turies these late-flowering tulips persisted only 
in occasional cottage gardens in England and 
Holland, and we have only in the last fifteen 
years or so discovered how splendidly they 
thrive in our California gardens, where they 
have almost entirely replaced the less thrifty 
early-blooming sorts. 




A HOUSE ON THE HILLSIDE, WM. LEE WOOLLETT. 
ARCHITECT 



An Ideal School for Young Women 

Cumnock g>cf)ool 

COLLEGE WORK IN THE FOLLOWING 
COURSES: 
Vocal Interpretation of Literature 
Literary Appreciation Story Telling 
Public Speaking Journalism 
Dramatics Short-Story 
Voice and Diction Dancing 
French Psychology 

Art and Art Appreciation 
An accredited High School and Junior School 
under same management 

HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
200 S. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles 

54720— Wilshire 79 



HOW TO FIND THE BIRDS 
IN CALIFORNIA 

By THERESA HOMET PATTERSON 

MARCH and April are the months to visit 
the Colorado desert. Any one who has 
not seen Palm Springs and the Coachella Val- 
ley when the verbena is in bloom does not 
know what California can do in the way of 
color and perfume. Miles and miles of solid 
color running down to the Salton Sea, with a 
glowing sunset wall to the east, and an in- 
digo wall to the west rising to the snows of 
San Jacinto. Do not miss it. This year there 
has been less rain than is needed for profu- 
sion of bloom. 

The Phainopepla will be nesting at Thermal. 
Along the sandy road leading to Painted Can- 
yon the Verdin will be making its nest of 
gray briars in the gray thorns of the cruci- 
fixion tree — a nest all out of proportion to 
this wee bird. Last year there was a decoy 
nest that could be reached from the car. 
The sun-parched perpendicular walls of the 
narrow canyon will resound with the songs 
of the Rock and Canyon Wrens creeping like 
spiders along the crevices. The latter's song 
descends the scale with clear and ringing notes 
and is unmistakable. 

The Western Bird Guide is the only book 
having illustrations in color of the Western 
birds. As it is a pocket edition they are dim- 
inutive in size. The Audabon Society pub- 
lishes plates in colors^ but few of the distinc- 
tive California birds. These are needed for 
nature study in schools and clubs. A confer- 
ence was held to consider this demand and it 
was decided to solicit a fund to publish one or 
more plates, the fund to become a revolving 
one, from the sale of each edition, the Pasa- 
dena Audubon Society has voted funds to pub- 
lish the first one. 

Humans are not the only ones who have new 
Easter clothes. The birds put on their new 
and gayest plumage, but the Spring style has 
not changed a feather since the time of K'uiix 
Tut and therefore the great sensation caused 
by a Nuttall Woodpecker, appearing in Grif- 
fith Park dressed in pure white, keeping only 
his red cap. I fancy the birds said, "White 
skinned" anyway his venture at trying some- 
thing new cost him his life and has made a 
mummy of him. He will lie in his glass tomb 
in Exposition Park Museum while the proces- 
sion reaching far into the future, passes by 
commenting "Albino, a freak of nature not 
uncommon among robins." While it seemed a 
pity to remove such an attraction from the 
park his conspicuous white costume would have 
made him early game for owls or hawks. 

1 know of nothing more exhilarating than 
following up the song of the ruby-crowned 
kinglet to find that rare composer and per- 
chance get the thrill of seeing the ten carat 
ruby in his crown. It is only on occasions 
that he uncovers, "once out of twenty times," 
as Miss Miller said in her bird class, but that 
moment was the twentieth time. Tilted at just 
the right angle with wings outstretched and 
fluttering, directly in front of us, he raised his 
crown feathers. The sun struck that match- 
less color and glorified the morning for us. 





The 

Gearharts 

ETCHINGS AND 
BLOCK PRINTS 

By Local and Foreign Printmakers 

6 1 I South Fair Oaks Ave. 

Near California St. 
PASADENA 
Phone Colorado 4449 





Pacific-Southwest 
Review 

By AUSTIN O. MARTIN 
Vice-President, The First National Bank 
of Los Angeles. 

The extent and grand- 
eur of our system of Na- 
tional Parks is incompara- 
ble. Nowhere in the world 
is there anything to equal 
the surpassing beauty of 
its individual un!ts or the 
wide variety of scenery of- 
fered by the whole. The 
attractions of the Parks 
run the gamut of scenic- 
beauty from the stupen- 
dous, gorgeously tinted 
walls of the Grand Can- 
yon to the graceful wisps 
of falls in the Yosemite. 
Glaciers, lakes, giant red- 
woods, high mountains, 
geysers, volcanoes — any- 
thing that is to be found anywhere is in our 
National Park system. 

That the people of the United States appre- 
ciate the recreational and educational advan- 
tages of their National Parks is indicated by 
the tremendous travel which has flowed into 
them during the past several years. The 
Parks' visiting lists for 1921 and 1922 showed 
more than a million visitors for each year. 

Information recently made public by the De- 
partment of the Interior shows that the cost 
of maintaining the splendid system of the Na- 
tional Parks and Monuments, which have been 
referred to as "the greatest heritage of any 
people on earth," is but one cent and one mill 
for each individual in the United States. The 
government estimates that in 1924, about 1,200,- 
000 of the "owners" of these park properties 
will enjoy them. In order to keep down the 
per capita cost of maintenance, the policy is 
to have these actual Park visitors pay in indi- 
rect or direct revenue a large proportionate 
share of the total cost. 

The people of the Pacific-Southwest should 
be particularly interested in the National 
Parks for this district more than any other 
in the country is "the land out-of-doors." Many 
of the Parks are either situated within the 
boundaries of this territory or within easy 
journey from it. 

Every year thousands of acres of timber- 
land are devastated through the carelessness 
of campers. Congress has just appropriated 
$25,000 for use during 1924 in fighting forest 
fires which occur within the National Parks. 
A very large percentage of the fires are avoid- 
able if those who go to enjoy nature with n 
these preserves, will carefully observe th? 
rules laid down by Park authorities. In 1921 
there were 5,851 fires in the National Forests 
of our country which burned over 376,208 
acres of timbered and open land, or 2.4 per 
cent of the total net area of the forests. An 
astounding fact is that seventy-five per cent 
of all the fires that occurred were due to hu- 
man agencies, and could have been prevented 
by care and vigilance on the part of the forest 
users. 

In the Interior Department Bill, approved 
January 24, Congress appropriated for the 
fiscal year 1924, $1,689,730 for the adminis- 
tration, protection, maintenance and improve- 
ment of National Parks and Monuments. 

The First National a Pacific-Southwest 
Bank of iq^angeles & trust t, savwo Bank 

ADVERTISEMENT 



M. R. Ward & Company, Inc. 



HOME BUILDERS 



REAL ESTATE 



INSURANCE 



Fair Oaks 6700 
95 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, California 



Hall's School of Dancing 

Under Personal instruction of 
Mark C. S. Hall 
Member of the American Society of 
Teachers of Dancing. Organized 1879 
and Vice-President of the California 
Association of Teachers of Dancing 
333 Summit Ave. Pasadena, Calif. 

Phone Colorado 2770 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



23 



THE SMALL HOUSE SERVICE OF THE LOS ANGELES 

ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 



OFFICERS 
Clifford A. Truesdell, Jr., President 
■302 San Fernando Bldg., Los Angeles 

Lloyd Rally, Vice-President 
1019 Wright and Callender Building 
Paul W. Penland, Secretary 
Roscoe E. Bowles, Treasurer 



Offices of the Club, 818 Santee Street 

DIRECTORS 
William Lee Woolett 
Pacific Mutual Bldg., Los Angeles 

Donald Wilkinson 
Merchants Bank Bldg., Los Angeles 
Walter S. Davis 
West Sixth Street, Los Angeles 





i 



on 






SMALL HOUSE COMMITTEE 
Sumner M. Spaulding, Chairman 
Hibernian Bldg., Los Angeles 
Donald B. Parkinson, 

Walter S. Davis 
David J. Witmer, Jr. 
Wm. Staunton, Jr. 



COMPETITORS who were 
awarded mentions in the 
last competition of the Archi- 
tectural Club of Los Angeles 
are: G. C. Bavienhock, John D. 
Miller, F. W. Gloege, A. J. 
Schoeder, Rodney D. McClel- 
land. Their plans and designs 
for small houses to cost $5000 
are on exhibition in the rooms 
of the Club at 818 Santee Street 
on Tuesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day evenings, and will also be 
presented in miniature on this 
page from month to month. 



House builders who want this 
service which is giving to the 
small house the same quality of 
trained supervision which is se- 
cured by those building more 
expensive homes, will thus be 
able to choose from a variety of 
plans and to consult with the 
designer in person. 

The price of the plan and 
specifications is less than that 
usually asked, and will be fully 
covered by the saving in mis- 
takes which an ordinary bun- 
galow-book plan invariably leads 
to when attempt is made by the 
builder to change or adapt it to 
the owner's ideas. By talking 
over the plan with the architect 
who made it, the patron can call 
for changes at once and have 
drawings made to suit him. The 
fees are divided between the de- 
signer of the plan chosen, 
and the Library fund which 
the Architectural Club is using 
to the upbuilding of better arch- 
itecture in Los Angeles. Thus 
by using this small house serv- 
ice of the Architects, one who 
cares for good architecture and 
a well built house is not only 
securing a good house for him- 
self but is encouraging the lo- 
cal architects in their efforts to 
improve the general architect- 
ural looks of the residence 
streets in Los Angeles. Read- 
ers of California Southland 
are urged to try this new meth- 
od of obtaining an architect's 
plan before they decide to build 
without trained guidance. The 
house one is to live in comfort- 
ably should be thought out by 
all concerned before it is built 
and not afterward when 
changes are expensive and often 
impossible. 

CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 
acknowledges with grateful 
thanks the gift of the 1922 
Year Book of Architecture 
and Allied Arts, presented by 
the President of the Southern 
California Chapter, American 
Institute of Architects. It is a 
handsome record of work, done 
in Los Angeles and exhibited at 
the Museum of History, Science 
and Art in January, 1923. The 
book is issued by the Chapter 
and the Architectural Club and 
marks an epoch in the Architec- 
ture of the Country. It is hand- 
somely printed by Young and 
McCallister, Los Angeles 



24 



CALIFORNIA SOI' T II I. A Y /) 




The ear drops illustrated are diamond 
paved, with pendants of carved jade of 
extra fine color — an exclusive Brock & 
Company creation. 

JEWELED ear drops are the alternating flash 
to sparkling eyes — the exclamation points to 
feminine vivacity — the scintillant touch that 
gives perfection to woman's crowning grace — a well 
conceived coiffure. 

And ear drops now, are at the peak of fashion's 
favor. 

Visitors Welcome 



DrockG Comparr 

515 West Seventh Street 




ADVENTURES IN BEADWORK 

<Sy EDNA GEARHART 

THE designing and weaving of a bead neck- 
lace are not work; they are an absorbing 
game — a game with rules as definite as those 
of navigation; with the charm and chance of 
Mah Jongg; and the artistic authority of 
the days of King Tutenkhamun. The design 
must be plotted on squared paper, a bead to a 
square, seven, nine, eleven or thirteen beads 
wide. Uneven numbers make the most effect- 
ive designs, and a design all squared up looks 
very trig and trim. The design for the pen- 
dant is twice the width of the band plus one 
bead. The most interesting necklaces are 
those in which the band is made of about six 
woven insets connected by plain strands of 
beads in between. 

The color scheme should be based on prac- 
tically three hues, one for the background, 
one decided hue for the pattern, and some- 
thing snappy for a delusion. A combination 
of crystal and opaque beads is best. 

A prosaic, phlegmatic soul with no taste 
for adventure can buy a bead loom for a dol- 
lar at any department store, and a book of 
ready-made designs for a quarter. But if one 
has pioneer or seafaring blood in his veins, and 
is the descendant of forebears handy with the 
knife and the compass, he will scorn these 
canned short cuts to mediocrity and choose to 
spend a profitable morning's work charting 
his own design, and whittling out his own 
loom from a cigar box, and an empty spool. 
Cut grooves or teeth in the end of the box, 
stretch the threads over it; wind up the com- 
pleted section as it progresses on the spool 
anchored on the box. This is a simple, but 
seaworthy craft. Use linen thread, number 
ninety, waxed. Cut one more thread than the 
number of beads wide. Cut the threads very 
long, about sixty inches; lay in a neat skein- 
it snarls with frightful ease — find the middle 
and lay it over the spool and wind up one half. 
Stretch out the other half taut and straight 
over the teeth or comb and fasten at the end 
with a peg or tack. First weave the inset 
nearest the middle. Run the right number 
of beads on the bead needle, the nine beads of 
the first row, and slip the beads under the 
warp, beads alternating threads, leaving a 
thread on the outside of each end, and then run 




NECKLACE IN COLD AND GREEN. BY EDNA 
GEARHART. 

the needle back again through the beads above 
the warp, thus securing the beads and virtually 
weaving them in. The most important point 
is that the beginning and end of every thread 
used in stringing the beads, the weft, must 
be run back in through one or two rows of 
beads, rewoven, never knotted or merely tied. 



Between insets, select two of the warp 
threads at a time, releasing them from the 
end where they have been secured, and thread 
both on one needle and string beads about two 
or three inches in length. This will make five 
strands of beads if the inset is nine beads or 
ten threads wide. 

When one side is finished, release the other 
side of the warp, wind the finished side on the 
spool, and then continue the weaving. When 
it is finished the proper length, roll up the 
necklace on the spool, being careful not to 
twist it, as the chain must lie flat around 
the neck. Lay out all the warp threads of 



FRENCH and ITALIAN ARTS and CRAFTS 

Imported by 
MISS UOLLINGSWORTH BEACH 
Evening Bags, Old Silver, etc. Antiques 
Embroidered Linens Potteries 
630 E. Colorado Street Pasadena. Calif. 

Fair Oaks 6028 



HEWSON STUDIOS 

HANDWOVEN HOMESPUNS For 
Dresses. Skirts, Scarfs, Blankets and Bags 



602 E. Colorado St. Pasadena 
Phone: Fair Oaks 6555 



each end, twenty in all, side by side in the 
teeth, and secure the ends, and weave the 
pendant, thus uniting the two sides. The 
united warp will make ten strands of fringe 
hanging below the pendant. The thread must 
loop over an extra bead at the end of the 
fringe and be rewoven back up through the 
fringe to secure it. To demonstrate the lucid- 
ity of these directions, it is necessary for each 
of you to make a necklace for himself. 



Stendahl Galleries 

Ambassador lintel 
Los Angeles 

Art Exhibitions for April 

Premier Showing 
Paintings of tie Desert 
By John Frost 
April 2-18 

Paintings and Etchings Paintings 
By Arinin Hansen By Roherl Vonnoh 

April 8-22 May 7-21 

Recent European Paintings Sculpture 

Bv Ktlgar A. Payne By Bessie Potter Vonnoh 
April 18-30 May 7-21 

Hotel Vista dei. Arroyo 
Pasadena Gallery 
Paintings by 
Joseph Kleitsch 
April 2-30 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



25 



INTIMATE CORNERS IN A HOME By MARGARET CRAIG, 'with Illustrations by the Author 



THE home that has all the intangible qualities of taste and the 
indefinable feeling cf alluring hominess, invites the analytical 
observer to question the cause of the satisfying effect. Thekla Mer- 
tens has bestowed such a treatment upon the interior decoration of 
the home of Mrs. F. E. Keeler, of Hollywood, California. 

By definite consideration of the furnishing of inviting corners in 
the home and with felicitous skill bestowing unity upon the whole 
scheme by a subtle blending of mellow colors, Miss Mertens has 
attained an admirable example of home decoration. There are 
corners for music and for reading, corners for the serving of after- 
noon tea, and corners for the absorbed letter writer. 

In the living room the paintings by noted artists form keynotes 
for sustained groupings of wall furnishings. 

Neighboring the fireplace is a noteworthy group built around one 
of Ryder's autumnal landscapes. Below the painting is arranged a 
tete-a-tete couch covered in a lustrous grey green silk velvet. Three 
silken pillows adorn it in lavender and orchid shades that echo the 
tones of the hazy mountains in the picture above. One pillow in- 
cludes the design of a splash of violet colored chrysanthemums, 







IN THE CHARMING HOME OF MRS. KEELER, HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



PAINTINGS BY MASTERS IN ART STRIKE THE KEY NOTE IN THESE 
ROOMS BY THEKLA MERTENS 

— Photographs by Margaret Craig. 

while another is accented by a cluster of autumn fruit and has long 
dangling tassels of mauve. At the left of the settee is an occasional 
table bearing an irridescent Tiffany lamp and a rose lavender bowl 
for violets, while at the right, on the floor, is the black and white 
Chinese cat of Contentment, reposing on a round black velvet cushion. 

On the opposite side of the fireplace is a more formal group. Here 
the painting by William Ritchell forms the keynote. The Italian 
walnut cabinet for the organ records is covered by a scarf of silver 
cloth shot with lavender, surrounded by a heavy velvet moss sug- 
gesting the breaking waves seen in Mr. Ritchell's seascape. The 
note of accent here is rendered by the torquoise blue lustre vase. 

Mrs. Keeler is widely known for her discriminating taste as shown 
in a fine collection of worthwhile paintings. She is a fortunate 
possessor of a Keith, an Inness, and a Childe Hassam among many 
others. These works of art form a nucleus for inspiring the decorator 
in the happy assembling of many interesting and intimate corners. 




Consulting Decorator 

By Appointment at your residence 

Studio 612 S Alvarado St. 
Wilshire 6737 Los Angeles 



THE BATCHELDER TILES 




We produce Tile for Fireplaces, Fountains, Pave- 
ments, Garden Pots — anything that is appropriately 
made from clay. :: :: :: :: :: 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 




CHIPPENDALE TIP TOP TABLE 



720 WEST SEVENTH STREET 
LOS ANGELES 



26 C A LI F <) R V / A SOUTHLAND 



THE MONEY MARKET BftWS* 

THE spectacular report of the La Follette committee on the oil 
situation in the United States resulting in the broadcasting of a 
"dollar per gallon gasoline" rumor will prove valuable only as a 
source of entertainment among the informed and a cause for self- 
education regarding the petroleum industry among the uninstructed. 

It is reported that President Kingsbury of the Standard Oil 
Company of California, in commenting on the La Follette report has 
stated that cotton at a dollar per pound and wheat at five dollars 
per bushel are quite as possible — in other words, quite as improbable 
— as gasoline at a dollar per gallon so far in the future as the best- 
focused human vision can reach. 

This is an appropriate answer to the "dollar per gallon gasoline" 
conclusion drawn by La Follette and his associated political charla- 
tans — which they drew without any convictions of their own, and 
for the sole purpose of feeding popular ignorance with a fuel which 
might redound to their own political warmth. 

That the Standard Oil Companies throughout America may now 
have it within their power to control the retail price of gasoline is 
not improbable. Under certain circumstances it would be a very 
desirable thing to have it in the power of the Standard Oil Com- 
panies to control those prices, since the fixing of such a tremendous 
responsibility so definitely is in itself a guarantee against the misuse 
of that power. On the other hand, the extent to which exploitation 
and development of the oil fields is being conducted by independents 
and many large producers not directly associated or dependent in 
any wise upon the Standard Oil Companies for their prosperity, 
creates a factor of sufficient weight in itself to subject so-called 
control of retail prices by the Standard to the continuous threat of an 
overplus of crude should the Standard attempt to increase prices on 
the refined product through the only means at its command — i. e., 
curtailment of refining. 

The prosperity of the Standard Oil Companies, as well as that 
of all successful large producers, manufacturers and marketers of 
petroleum products, has not been based on control of the market, but 
on intelligent extension of the market and the ingenious development 
of petroleum products for the satisfaction of requirements that were 
cared for in other ways in the past. Low capitalization as applied 
to the intrinsic worth of the properties and invaluable manufactur- 
ing and commercial organization of the Standard companies, far 
more than the price at which commodities have been sold, has ac- 
counted for the spectacular yet basically sound returns which share- 
holders in these companies have enjoyed, and over which cheap 
political "palaver" has flowed so freely. 

It can be hoped in the interests of the country at large and of 
the industry in particular that the development, manufacturing and 
marketing of petroleum products could become so thoroughly central- 
ized in the hands of a few organizations that direct federal control 
of the industry might be established. Although the writer holds to 
the security of the present situation as proof against any such pos- 
sibility as the La Follette committee has sprung like a "jack-in-the- 
box" on the public, yet intelligent federal regulation of the produc- 
tion, as well as distribution and prices, exercised over a relatively 
few centers of responsibility through a commission similar to the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, would doubly safeguard the indus- 
try and public alike against any possible weakness on their part and 
most of all against the omnipresent danger of conscienceless attacks 
by men of the La Follette stripe. 

Perhaps the greatest weakness in federal governmental relation- 
ship to industry of a national scope in the United States today, out- 
side the railroad field, is the fact that the Supreme Court, through the 
Clayton and Sherman anti-trust laws, exercises the only controlling 
influence. And that control has been proved by time to have been a 
destructive rather than a constructive influence so far as efficiency 
through consolidation is concerned. There must be substituted for 
that antiquated and entirely arbitrary control the flexible and intel- 
ligent supervision which congressional delegation of powers to proper 
commissions alone can establish. 

Both to the consuming public and to the shareholders in companies 
producing, manufacturing and marketing petroleum on a large scale, 
the La Follette committee report means absolutely nothing and should 
be discounted from the par of publicity which it has received to the 
discount below zero to which the cheap political purposes that brought 
it forth alone entitle it. 



Leo G. Mac Laugh I in Co. 

Investment Securities 
Established 1899 



Pasadena 



Los Angeles 



A HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA— THE SPANISH PERIOD 

By Charles E. Chapman. Illustrated, $4.00 
An authoritative popular history, which presents a vast amount of new 
material, some portions of which have never appeared in print. 
At all bookstores or from 
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 
609 Mission St. San Francisco. Cal. 



O^wn Your 
oApartment 



Apartments consisting of large 
18x14 living room with disappear- 
ing bed recessing into large dressing 
closet joining bath, with all modern 
installations kitchenette with built- 
in features; breakfast nook, or small 
dining room. 

Also large apartments with one or 
two bed rooms additional to above. 
Floor plans at office of building. 

Pasco Arms Co. 

525 E. Colorado St. 
Telephone Fair Oaks 5349 



Harmonizing Profit 
With Safety 



Large profits and strong security do not travel together. 
It is usually true that to make big gains one must take 
big risks; and, conversely, to insure safety of principal 
one must be content with a moderate return on the in- 
vestment. 

However, it is frequently possible for one who keeps in 
close touch with financial matters to increase his income 
materially without in any way jeopardizing bis principal. 

To assist investors in harmonizing profit with safety, and 
obtaining the most attractive returns consistent with 
strong security, is one of the important functions of our 
organization. 

Send for new booklet "Facts Important to Investors" 

GorernmerW, Municipal and Corporation Bonds 

314 Van Nuvs Bldg., Los Angeles — Telephone Pico 787 

Santa Barbara San Francisco Pasadena 

1014 State Street 603 Cal. Commercial Union Bldg. 16 So. Raymond Ave. 
Telephone 494 315 Montgomery St. Fair Oalcs 26 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 27 




THE word "Alaska" is from the Indian "Al-ay-ek-sa," the great 
land. The government and the people of the United States are just 
coming into a realization, after fifty-five years' ownership, that 
Alaska is truly a great land. It is difficult to write of Alaska ~nd its 
unexplored vastness without merely repeating the contents of num- 
erous books of travel; yet it is stimulating to remember that this won- 
derland is part of our own glorious West Coast and that it is not 
necessary to journey to Europe to see marvelous fjords, rugged 
mountains and matchless glaciers, with which for scenic grandeur, 
neither Europe with its Norway and Switzerland, nor any other 
part of the world, has anything to compare. 

The "Inside Passage" is the Norwegian coast multiplied and mag- 
nified. On leaving Seattle one begins to experience the delight of the 
explorer who seeks a strange land. Beautiful Puget Sound, sur- 
rounded by snow-capped mountains and studded with hundreds of 
rugged and wooded islands, soon gives place to the Straits of Georgia 
between Vancouver Island and the main land of British Columbia 
and we are literally at sea among towering mountains. This passage 
is in reality an immense submerged valley, bordered by island peaks 
and cliffs, cleft in a thousand places by deep fjords with glaciers at 
their heads. A number of these glaciers are so stupendous in size 
that any one of them would cover the whole of Switzerland. Melis- 
pina Glacier has a face of more than eighty miles, and an average 
height of three hundred feet and is but one of a dozen accessible. 

The mountains of Alaska are among the most rugged and beautiful 
in all the world and appeal equally to the mountain climber and to 
those who appreciate the bigness of the works of nature but are 
satisfied with a less personal contact. Mt. McKinley, the top of the 
North American Continent, 20,404 feet above sea level, may be 
reached by the new Government railway from Seward. 

Just under the Arctic Circle lies Fairbanks, the heart of the 
"Land of the Midnight Sun," and from here may be seen this won- 
derful and unique sight, to view which hundreds every year, travel 
half way round the globe to northern Norway. The great exterior 



of Alaska is a country of magnificent proportions, and its beauties, 
wonders and opportunities make it most alluring to visit, but it was 
not until 1916 that a party under the direction of the National 
Geographic Society, discovered what has since been justly termed 
the Eighth Wonder of the World. 

On the Alaskan Peninsula, among the snowy Aleution Mountains, 
is the "Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes." Surrounded by moun- 
tains and active volcanoes, some of which send their columns of 
smoke five miles into the air, the floor of the valley, five miles wide 
and seventeen long, is pitted with millions of small volcanoes, fumer- 
oles with jets of many colored steam. The encrustations around the 
fumeroles are more varied and gaudy than in any other known region 
and exceed even the Grand Canyon in brilliancy of color. In the 
Grand Canyon it is a matter of distances, the effect of lights and 
shadows on the various formations, but in the highly mineralized 
region of the "Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes" it is the mud itself 
that is so brightly colored, making the valley resemble in a gigantic 
way, the palette of an artist. 

Up to this time, none but the members of the expeditions sent in by 
the National Geographic Society have visited this wonderful region, 
as it is inaccessible to the ordinary tourist, but during the coming- 
summer two parties of Californians will spend several weeks in our 
"newest and grandest National Monument." Los Angeles will have 
the credit of sending the first party of travellers into the reservation. 
Mr. Lucius G. Folsom, one of the discoverers of the valley, will per- 
sonally conduct these parties, the first of which will leave Los 
Angeles on May 25. Details and bookings are being arranged by the 
Travel Service Bureau, 507 South Spring St., Los Angeles. 

This is an innovation in summer vacations, leaving the beaten path 
and witnessing what seems to be almost like earth in the making. 
Still, this is but one of the attractions. Alaska is a domain so large 
and so varied, so magnificent in scenery and delightful in its summer 
climate that it offers novelty and pleasure to the widest diversity 
of interests. Truly was Alaska called, the Land of Superlatives. 



"One of the most beautiful hotels and gardens 
in the world" 

SAMARKAND {Persian) 

on its own hill of thirty acres, overlooking 
mountains and sea, midway between the 
beach and wonderful Golf Links, and yet 
only five minutes from the heart of beautiful 

Santa Barbara, California 

An exclusive hotel of peculiar excellence, set 
in a flower garden of riotous color, operated 
on the American Plan with a cuisine of 
acknowledged distinction. A limited num- 
ber of double rooms and cloistered suites 
available for the summer at special rates. 

For literature and information address 

CHARLES BEDELL HERVEY, Prop. 



THE EL ROBLAR 

OJAI, CALIFORNIA 
The little hotel where you feel at home' 
F. J. Barrington, Proprietor 



The... 

RAYMOND 

Open 

PASADENA 
Southern California 

Walter Raymond. 

Proprietor 






FLINTR1DGE is today the 
scene of the greatest build- 
ing activity in its history. 

There is only one Flintridge — 
there is only just so much Flint- 
ridge. 

Those incomparable Flintridge 
homesites, overlooking moun- 
tains, fairway, parkland, lake and 
valley, will not be long available 
at present prices. 

Flintridge Sales Company 

727 Title Ins. Bldg., Los Angeles. 
Tel: 10601, Main 685 
Tract Office: Fair Oaks 212 



^^^^ 




Sun kissed 

Ocean washed 
Mountain girded 
Island guarded 



SANTA BARBARA 

If you like California you uill lore Santa Barbara 

JOHN D. BURNHAM, Realtor 

Associated with H. G. CHASE 

1012 State Street Phone 69 



THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 

PRIVATE ESTATE 

Inquires the most thorough study of the 
many conditions involved. BE SURE 
you secure competent service. 



nrertrc 



LANDSCAPE .\ ENGINEER .*. CONTRACTOR 
PASADENA 



A CHARMING COUNTRY HOME REPRODUCTION OE MISSION ARCHITECTURE 



On ft hilltop, in 
front of a canyon 
overlooking t It e 
beautiful San Ga- 
briel I alley, ex- 
clusive but near 
attractive town, 
boys' school and 
country club. 





* r» - 




/ft 


f 


% 





Substantially con- 
structed and en- 
tirely modern in 
comforts. Com- 
pletely furnished 
W it h genuine 
Spanish antiques, 
most carefully sel- 
ected. 



For Sale by JAMES FAR RA with NEVIN-REED CO., Pasadena, California 





CALI 



SOUTHLAND 





15 




NAK "YOU ADLt IN A PLACE. Of TMUALPH . S.CAR.U.T . SCOM{ SAY, IS THE, 
C-OLCR. OF A GR-tAT NOTE SOUNDED ON THE. 3UGI.E . THIS HALL IS L1W.E. 'Ht 6UGLE-CALL. 
OF THE PAST, THB.tU.IWG EVEN NOW DCWtf ALE THE AGES WITH A TR.1UMPH THAT IS 
\m SL'ft-ELV GJLEATEtV. THAN ANY OTHE.R. TR.lUM.Ptl. THE MOST WON0LR.OUS THINS IN EGYPT 

' I I THE MOS T VV-QNDE&XH'S TEMPLE IN THE, WOR.LD" " ROOERI" HIGHENS " 



LJJRIUMPH 



No. 41 



THE HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION IS TOLD IN ARCHITECTURE . THOUGH THAT 
ARCHITECTURE BE IN RUINS , AS IS THIS GREAT CULMINATING ACHIEVEMENT 
OF EGYPTIAN ART , SO WONDERFUL WAS ITS CONCEPTION, SO MAGNIFI- 
CENT ITS EXECUTION , THAT TODAY EVEN THE CASUAL VISITOR. IS SO 
IMPRESSED WITH THE POWE.R OF THE MERE STONES THAT HE COMES 
AWAY HUSHED AND AWED TO THE VERY SOUL . THE MASTERPIECES OF 
ARCHITECTURE DOWN THRU THE AGES HAVE THIS POWER TO THRILL OR 
TO SOOTHE, TO MAKE, JOYFUL OR TO BRING INEFFABLE PEACE. 

THE ARCHITECT OF TODAY, FROM HIS STUDIES OF THESE MASTERPIECES 
MUST LEARN THIS POWER OF MOULDING THE MATERIALS OF BUILDING SO 
AS TO REFLECT THE THOUGHTS AND THE LIVES OF THE PEOPLE . HIS IM- 
AGINATION, HIS KNOWLEDGE , HIS SKILL MUST BE DEVELOPED TO GIVE/ 
EACH BUILDING A PERSONALITY. EACH PROMPTS HIM TO A DIFFERENT 
MOOD AND WAKI£ IN HIS NATURE A DIFFERENT RESPONSE, AND THE SIM- 
PLEST OF STRUCTURES MAY" BECOME A TRIUMPH IP IT BE NOT UGLT NOR 
WASTEFUL AND GIVES COMFORT AND RAPJUNLSS TQ OTHERS. 

ALLIED ARCHITECTS ASSOCIATION OF LOS AN.<?M|ff^ i W. 



MAY, 1923 





20 Cents 



C A LI F () R N I A S O I T II t A A I) 



To the Epicures of Los Angeles 

9 A House forlhe Spicure 



The A. J. Mathieu Co. is 
not an ordinary grocery 
store. It does not seek to 
supply the ordinary needs 
of the pantry. It was de- 
signed to satisfy the dis- 
criminating demands of 
those to whom dining is 
an art and is exclusively a 
high-class shop where the 
most delectable foods of 
the world may be found. 



J. J. Mathieu Co. 

Specialty Grocers 
642 South Flower Street 
Los Angeles 



"THE OLD SWIMMING HOLE" 





BROOKSIDE PARK, PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



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I SOUTHLAND ! 
! CALENDAR 



^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi. 

Announcements of exhibitions, fetes, 
concerts, club entertainments, etc., for 
the calendar pages are free of charge and 
should be received in the office of Cali- 
fornia Southland, Pasadena, at least 
two weeks previous to date of issue. Ho 
corrections can be guaranteed if they are 
received later than that date. 

The public is warned that photog- 
raphers have no authority to arrange for 
sittings, free of charge or otherwise, for 
publication in Southland unless appoint- 
ments have been made especially in writ- 
ing by the Editor. 



California Southland is published monthly at 
Pasadena, California. One dollar and twenty 
cents for six issues, two dollars per year. Ad- 
dresses will be changed as many times as de- 
tired if notice is given before the first of the 
month in which the change is made. 

Entered as second class matter, July 28, 1919 
it the Post Office at Pasadena, California, 
under act of March 3, 1879. 



Clubs 



V 



F 



ALLEY HUNT CLUB: 
The last of the season's entertain- 
ments following the Sunday evening 
suppers will be given on May 6th. It 
is designed as a farewell to the presi- 
dent of the past year, Mr. I. Graham 
Pattinson, and as a welcome to his 
successor, Mr. Joseph F. Rhodes, Jr. 
Mrs. Frank Gates Allen has kindly 
consented to arrange a musicale and 
will give an informal piano recital, 
assisted by the following artists : Mrs. 
Carrie Jacobs-Bond, who will sing a 
group of her own compositions ; Mrs. 
Maude Fenlon Bollmann, soprano; Mrs. 
Katharine Fisk, contralto. 
By request, the Monday afternoon 
Bridge and Mah Jongg Parties will 
continue throughout the month of May. 
May 7th, 1 :00 o'clock, the last Bridge 
Luncheon of this season. May 21st 
and 28th, 2 :30 o'clock, Bridge and Tea. 

A NNANDALE GOLF CLUB: 
" The afternoon bridge, Mah Jongg and 
tea parties have been discontinued for 
the season, but tea will be served as 
requested and tables for cards are al- 
ways available. 

The second Friday of each month is 
open day at the club. 
The usual Wednesday and Saturday 
sweepstakes during May. 

LINTRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB: 
The dinner dance of the month will be 
given Wednesday evening. May 30. 
Ladies' Day has been changed from 
Monday to the first Tuesday in every 
month. On every Ladies' Day the 
women golfers from the clubs in the 
Southern California Association will 
be welcome. 

OS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB : 
J Ladies Days, second Monday of each 
month. 

Music during dinner, followed by 
dancing, every Saturday evening 
during the month. 

Luncheon served from 11 :30 to 2 
p. m. on Saturdays. 

Sunday night concerts during month 
twice a month. 

Tea served as requested and tables 
for cards always available. 

ILSHIRE COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies' Days, third Monday of each 
month. 

Dancing every second and fourth 
Saturdays during the month. 
A musical is arranged for each Sun- 
day night in the month. 

lyriDWICK COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies' Days, fourth Monday in each 
month. 

Tea and informal bridge every after- 
noon. 

Polo, Wednesday and Saturday of 
each week. 

Dancing every Saturday night in the 
month. 

T OS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB: 

Dinner dances, Tuesday and Friday 
nights of every week. Tuesday night 
informal ; Friday night semi-formal. 
Plunge open to the ladies Tuesday and 
Friday of every week. 

TV/TONTECITO COUNTRY CLUB: 
1*1. p rov jd es an ig hole golf course, two 
concrete and two dirt courts for ten- 
nis, bowls and croquet. 
Tea is served and informal bridge 
parties arranged as desired. 
A buffet supper is served every Sun- 
day night. 

EWPORT HARBOR YACHT CLUB: 
Every member of the club is busy, pol- 
ishing, painting and generally clean- 
ing house in anticipation of Inspection 
and the big "Birthday Party" with 



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Old En glish 
Silver Bowl 
Made in London 
by M. Spink 
Date 1804 



2L ^>cf)tmt>t anb ^>on 

Established 1869 

IMPORTERS of Old and 
Modern English Silver, 
Sheffield Plate, Old and Mod- 
ern Glass and China. 

387 East Colorado Street 

PASADENA CALIFORNIA 

8 East 48th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Boston, Mass. Magnolia, Mass. 

Newport, R. I. Washington, D. C. 




BULLOCKS 

S p O r- t 5 



" O n r 



wear 
k 



- e- 

c I o 



Bullock's Spoitswear 
Store predicts a sum- 
mer vogue for the 
sleeveless golfing 
sweater. 

S aturdays " 



which the season opens, May 19th. 
This party, with its huge cake and 
ever-increasing candles — now six — is 
always of intense interest to all the 
yachtsmen. 

CALIFORNIA YACHT CLUB: 

Commodore Eugene Overton has mailed 
notices to the members to have their 
yachts in commission and ready for 
inspection May 12, when the season 
officially opens. Prizes will be given 
the boats receving the highest awards. 
In the evening the opening dinner 
dance will be held. 



Art 

T^HE fourth annual exhibition of the 
Painters and Sculptors of Southern 
California opened May 4, in the gallery 
of Fine and Applied Arts, Los Angeles 
Museum of History, Science and Art, and 
will continue throughout the month. The 
jury selected by the exhibiting artists is 
as follows : For paintings, Dana Bart- 
lett, Alson Clark, Jean Mannheim, Han- 
son Puthuff, John Rich, Jack Wilkinson 
Smith, Roscoe Shrader, Edouard Vysekal, 
William Wendt ; alternates, Mabel Alvarez, 
Benjamin Brown and Clarence Hinkle. For 
sculpture, Julia Bracken Wendth, Car- 
taino Scarpitta, David Edstrom ; alternates, 
Casper Gruenfeld and Carlo Romanelli. 
For miniatures, Gertrude Little, Emma 
Siboni and Laura Mitchell ; alternates, 
Mary Allen and Ella S. Bush. 

AT the meeting of the California Art 
Club in May the guest of honor will be 
Charles Wakefield Cadman, who has re- 
cently returned to Los Angeles after a suc- 
cessful concert tour. 

rpHE new studio and gallery of Dana 
Bartlett will be completed and open to 
his friends and the public on May 15th, 
101 South Virgil Avenue, Los Angeles. 

JACK WILKINSON SMITH will continue 
his exhibition in the recently created 
Art Department at Barker Bros., Los An- 
geles, through May 10. 

rpHE Spring Exhibition, held by the La- 
guna Beach Art Association in the 
Laguna Beach gallery, will continue until 
the works for the summer show have been 
assembled. The present exhibition includes 
William Wendt, with his "When the Dew 
Is on the Meadows" : Jack Wilkinson 
Smith, "Pacific Shore" : Franz Bischoff, 
"Roses" : Orrin White, "Santa Paula Val- 
ley" ; William Griffith, "Spring at Ban- 
ning" ; Thomas L. Hunt, "In Laguna Can- 
yon" ; Jean Mannheim, "Portrait of R. 
Clarkson Colman" : Guy Rose, "Tamasch 
Trees With Figures" ; Hanson Puthuff, 
"Grove of the Arroyo" : Edgar Payne, 
"Morning and Sycamores" ; F. Carl Smith, 
"Reading the Good Book" ; Anna A. Hills, 
"After the Storm, Hemet" ; Max Wiec- 
zorek. "Marion" ; Julia Bracken Wendt, 
"He Whose Faith Soars." 

^pHE Municipal Gallery of Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, maintains a permanent exhibi- 
tion of the works of the different Calfornia 
artists by invitation only, and through 
this invitation Benjamin Brown has re- 
cently forwarded several paintings for dis- 
play during the next few months. 

rpHE pictorial photographers exhibiting at 
the Hollywood Woman's Club during 
April included Oscar Maurer, Margaret 
Craig, Philip du Bois, Margarethe Mather, 
Karl Struss, Viroque Baker, Edward Wes- 
ton, and Otis Williams. 

QANNELL AND CHAFFIN GALLERIES 
^ will exhibit beginnng May 1st for two 
weeks, selected paintings by well known 
painters in small sizes suitable for homes 
at moderate prices. Seldom is there an 
opportunity to secure at reasonable figures 
paintings by such important artists as 
Murray Bewley, George Bruestle, John 
Carlson, Bruce Crane, George Crossman, 
Warren Davis, Edward Duffner, John Gam- 
ble. Albert Groll, Glen Newell, Hobart 
Nichols, Leonard Ochtman, Edward Pott- 
hast, Granville Smith, Harry Vincent, Rob- 
ert Vonnah, Wlliam Ritschel and Chaun- 
cey F. Ryder. This is an unusual array of 
great talent not to be seen everyday or 
duplicated just anywhere. 

JEAN MANNHEIM will hold an exhibi- 
tion of landscapes and figures in his 
recently completed studio on Arroyo Drive, 
opening May 7th, and continuing through 
the month. Among other figures will be 
found the popular Boy Scout portrait, a 
number of desert paintings, and his won- 
derful marines. 

A LSON CLARK has just returned from 
a sketching trip into Mexico, where he 
was lured in search of the old adobes, his 
interest in them having increased with his 
painting of the Adobe Flores, recently pur- 
chased by the American Federaton of Art. 
TV/TAX WIECZOREK has recently com- 
pleted a figure painting, which he calls 
"The Mirage," it depicts a Spanish girl on 
a balcony with background of New York's 
skyline. Mr. Wieczorek will go to New 
York in June, where he has a permanent 
exhibit of ten pictures at the Artists' Gal- 
lery, Fifth Avenue, and expects to go 
abroad later in the summer. 

rpHE first showing of recent etchings by 
Loren Barton will be held from April 
30th to May 19th, inclusive, at the Cannell 
and Chaffin Galleries, 720 West Seventh St. 



4 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




HERBERT F. BROWN 

Stationery, Books 
And Picture Framing 



190 E. Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 66 



MONEY TO BUY 

DIAMONDS 

Sidney D. Cohn 

302 Bank of Italy Bldg. 
Seventh & Olive Sts. 



Bank Ref. 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



PASADENA LEATHER GOODS CO. 

Suit Cases, Purses, Bags 
Puttees for Men, Women and Children 
Insured and Guaranteed Trunks 
742 E. Colorado St., 
Fair Oaks 3 54 Pasadena 



LAUNDERERS DRY CLEANERS 

Royal Laundry Co. 

461 So Raymond Colo. 67 

Pasadena, Calif. 



WHY NOT HAVE THE BEST? 

American Laundry Co. 
Fair Oaks 514 
501 South Raymond Ave. 



Permutit Soft Water Saves 
Clothes 
TROY LAUNDRY 

In Business for Twenty Years 
Pasadena. Cal. Phone C. 146 

Alhambra 243-J 



WICK 

HOWARD MOTOR CO. 

267 W. Colorado St. 

C. S. Brokaw, Res. Mgr. Col. 397 



Phone F. O. 44477M 

A. VAN DUGTEREN & CO. 
Jewelers - Engravers 
Designers 

303 Fair Oaks Ave. 
Pasadena. Cal. 



Pasadena Corset Shop 

Mrs. H. B. Ford 
Corsetiere 

CORSETS AND ACCESSORIES 
308 East Colorado Street 

Fair Oaks 3388 Pasadena, Cal. 




In the Entrance Court on Seventh Street, 
Los. Angeles 

Canndl $ Crjatttn, 3nr. 

Paintings :: Period Furniture :: Antiques 
720 WEST SEVENTH STREET 
LOS ANGELES 



3L KB. Kntnnson Co. 

SEVENTH AND GRAND 

Whatever is new and interesting in travel, biography, fiction — 
literature in general — is procurable in the Book Section. First Floor 



J fie 

CATERERS AN 



il) ^CONFECTIONERS 



prepare the most delectable cool, crisp salads and the 
daintiest, yet altogether the most satisfying of sandwiches. Of 
course, there are the frozen dainties together with the wonder- 
ful French pastries for which the Elite has long been famous. 
Those who prefer hot dinner dishes such as steaks, chops, 
chicken, roast turkey or duck and other meats or fish are served 
daily a la carte from 1 1 :30 a. m. to 1 1 :30 p. m. The Catering 
Department is prepared to serve at your home for all occa- 
sions on short notice any number of people. 

A box of chocolates and Bon Bons or other candies of our own 
make can not fail to give satisfaction 

Elite Delicacy Shop 

629 to 641 SO. FLOWER ST., LOS ANGELES. Phone: Pico 1573 
634 E. COLORADO ST., PASADENA. Phone: Fair Oaks 4053 




Clark Vase No. 3 5 



Beautiful Garden Pieces 
in 

Sculptured Terra Cotta 

m 

Italian Terra Cotta Co. 

W. H. Robison 
1149 MISSION ROAD 
Opposite County Hospital 
Phone Lincoln 1057 Los Angeles 



Books . . . Toys 

Gulck Stationery Co. 

173 E. COLO. ST., Pasadena 
Fair Oaks 39 

Picture Framing, Artist's Supplies 



Colonial Candies 

Chocolate Nuts, Fruits and "Chews" 
made by 

LUCILE KNIGHT 

1044 East Orange Grove Avenue 
Bungalow No. 2 — Phone Colo. 9812 
The Yarn Shop. 388 E. Colorado St. 
Mail Orders Promptly Filled 
Pasadena, California 



THE 

Eleanor Miller School 
Expression and Music 

PASADENA 
Send for Catalogue 
Phone F. O. 336 251 Oakland Aye. 



J. R. BRAGDON & CO. 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Rentals and Bargains 
15 So. Raymond Ave., Pasadena 



MISS EDMISTON 
CHINA STUDIO 

Lessons in China Painting 
Gifts and Order Work a Specialty 
465 Herkimer St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Phone Colo. 9687 



Public Sal 



aies 



We have purchased 122,000 pair 
U. S. Army Munson last shoes, 
sizes 5 '-j to 12. which was the 
entire surplus stock of one of the 
largest U. S. Government shoe 
contractors. 

This shoe is guaranteed one hun- 
dred per cent solid leather, color 
dark tan. bellows tongue, dirt and 
waterproof. The actual value of 
this shoe is $6.00. Owing to this 
tremendous buy we can offer same 
to the public at $2.95. 

Send correct size. Pay postman 
on delivery or send money order. 
If shoes are not as represented 
we will cheerfully refund your 
money promptly upon request. 



National Bay State 
Shoe Company 

296 Broadway, New York. N. Y. 




The Radio 
Store... 

"Everything Worth 
While in Radio" 

Radio, Electric and 
Scientific Supplies 

Paul Franklin Johnson 

560-562 E. Colorado St. 
Pasadena, California 
Fair Oaks 3281 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



5 



One of the special etchings made on the 
Huntington estate will be exhibited and in 
addition to prints from entirely new plates, 
some New Orleans etchings never before 
exhibited will be on the walls. Miss Bar- 
ton has long been recognized, not only as 
the Southland's most considerable etcher, 
but as one of the foremost artists in this 
fascinating medium working today in 
America. 

rpHE West Coast Arts, Incorporated, are 
exhibiting in the Art Gallery of the 
public Library, Long Beach, during May. 

■QAVID ANTHONY TAUSZKY has just 
completed a portrait of Mrs. Clinton 
Churchill Clark, best known to the Com- 
munity Players of Pasadena as Margaret 
Clark, whose husband is the President of 
that organization. 

'T'HE print, "Allegro," shown by Otis 
Williams during the exhibit of the pic- 
torialists at the Hollywood Woman's Club, 
was reproduced in the 1922 Photograms of 
the Year, which is composed of selected 
prints from the London Salon. "Morning- 
Glory," another print made by Mr. Wil- 
liams, was reproduced in Pictorial Photog- 
raphy in 11)22, which represents what has 
been done in America in pictorial photog- 
raphy during the year. 

TXfATERCOLORS and etchings by Joseph 
Pennell are being shown at the Can- 
nell and Chafhn Galleries from April 30th 
to May 19th, inclusive. These vigorous 
watercolors of the Hudson at New York, 
with its busy water traffic crossing and re- 
crossing from sunrise to sunset, show us 
for the first time in Los Angeles a new 
phase of this versatile artist. A Pennell 
show is always one of the big artistic 
events of the year. 

T3EGINNING May 1st, Cannell and Chaf- 
fin Galleries will show for two weeks 
water colors of Desert Canyons by Henri 
De Kruif, one of our talented local artists. 
These paintings are most vivid of hue, in 
fact, gorgeously prismatic, for this artist 
is not interested in the realistic so much 
as the imaginative or abstract appeal of 
his subjects. These desert canyons south 
of Coachella Valley, Andreas and Palm, 
have a great fascination for this artist. 
Their weird natural beauty is well adapted 
for his almost tropical color sense. He has 
evolved some very striking decorative pic- 
tures which would brighten the wall of any 
room in a gratifying manner. 
T£ARL YENS of Laguna Beach is visiting 

Los Angeles, 
p. TOLLES CHAMBERLAIN is working 
hard on notable pieces in his studio on 
Oakland Avenue, Pasadena, but through 
his interest in all students finds time to 
criticize occasionally the work of the life 
class in the Art Students' League, Stck- ' 
ney Art School Studio, Lincoln and Fair 
Oaks. 

A COMBINED show of wood block prints, 
"straight" etchings and color etchings, 
the work of May Gearhart and Frances 
Gearhart, will be shown in the Art De- 
partment at Barker Bros., Los Angeles, 
opening May 10. and continuing through 
the month. 

rpHE Society of the Printmakers send 
traveling exhibitions throughout the 
State and have had most encouraging evi- 
dence of the growing appreciation of their 
work. Following a show at Calexico, How- 
ell Brown, the Secretary of the Printmak- 
ers Society, received a request that some 
one be sent to Calexico to explain the 
method of making prints, and give gen- 
eral information concerning them. In re- 
sponse Mr. Brown went down and talked 
to them and promised them a second exhi- 
bition as soon as it could be arranged, 
which will be within the next three months. 
r<HAUNCEY F. RYDER'S latest paint- 
^ ings will be shown May 15-30th at Can- 
nell and Chaffin Galleries, which will be 
one of the most important exhibits of the 
year. This great painter is deservedly 
well known for his finely composed, well 
painted landscapes. No artist handles at- 
mosphere more knowingly or more color- 
fully. To miss this exhibition would be 
something to regret. 

At the same time water colors of Cali- 
fornia scenes by Jacob Koch will be seen. 
These are painted in a simple, pleasing 
manner without any striving toward the 
wildly abstract or the intensely modern 
formula. 

JOSEPH SACKS, portrait painter of Phil- 
adelphia, divides his time between Santa 
Barbara and Pasadena. In the latter place 
he often comes in to criticize the work of 
the Life Class in the Art Students League, 
Lincoln and Fair Oaks Studio. Mr. Sacks 
has just finished a portrait of John Willis 
Baer, which he is showing in Santa Bar- 
bara. 

jyTARY ALLEN, one of the best minia- 
ture painters in this country, is an en- 
thusiastic member of the Art Students 
League and has charge of the studio at 
the Stickney Memorial Building, Pasadena. 



Music 




T^HE Philharmonic Orchestra of Los An- 
geles gave the final symphony concerts 
of the season, April 20 and 21, and are 
now making preparations for even a 
greater success next winter. The schedule 
for 1923-24 will open October 19 and will 
include fourteen Saturday evening Sym- 
phony concerts at 8 :30, twelve Sunday 
afternoon popular concerts at 3 o'clock, and 
six school concerts. The assurance given 



Marshall Laird 



^production of 
Fine Furniture 

Spanish English 
Italian Colonial 




WORK SHOP: 
416 E. NINTH ST. 



PHONE: 660-72 
LOS ANGELES 



by W. A. Clark, Jr., for a continuance of 
another six year.-, and the renewal of the 
contract as conductor by Walter Henry 
Rothwell, has increased the demand for 
season subscriptions, and indicates a larger 
audience for each event. 

THROUGH the action of the Pasadena 
Community Music Meeting, Arthur Far- 
well, conductor, and the corresponding ac- 
tion of the Pasadena Community Orchestra, 
Will Rounds, conductor, it has been de- 
cided to give an outdoor Community Fes- 
tival Concert in one of the open spaces of 
the city, on Sunday afternoon, near the 
middle of May, in which these two organ- 
izations shall co-operate. This concert will 
be free to all the people, and will repre- 
sent the spirit of service to the community 
which animates these two movements. The 
plan is to conduct this on broad and orig- 
inal lines, rich with variety of interest, and 
in all ways in keeping with the democratic 
spirit of community movements. 
AT the closing concert of the first series, 
" Thursday evening, April 19th, the Los 
Angeles Chamber Music Society presented 
the London String Quartette as guest 
artists. 

pHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN is 
^ again in Los Angeles and will remain 
until October, when his next concert sea- 
son opens. Mr. Cadman and Princess Tsi- 
anina have just returned from a tour of 
the Middle West, and as far east as Penn- 
sylvania, where an enthusiastic welcome 
was accorded them. 

TyrAUDE FENLON BOLLMAN recently 
appeared in a musical at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Gibbs of Altadena. 
She is now planning her annual recital to 
be given May 21, at the Ebell Club House, 
Los Angeles. 

THE dates and artists for the Spring 
A Morning Musicales during May at the 
Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles, are 
Thursday, May 3, Hallett Gilberte, Com- 
poser-Pianist. May 10th, Misha Ve Olin, 
Russian violinst ; Helena Lewyn, pianist. 
THE final Lyric Club concert of the sea- 
son will be given May 12, at the 
Philharmonic Auditorium. The theme is 
particularly appropriate for a May-time 
program, as the central idea is Divinity as 
manifested in nature. 

THE last concert of the Zoellner Quartet, 
Los Angeles Series, will be given Mon- 
day evening, May 14, at the Ebell Club 
Auditorium. 

THE next concert of the Los Angeles 
X Trio will be given at the Ebell Club 
Auditorium, Thursday evening, May 3. 
THE week of May 19 to 26 has been an- 
nounced as the annual Music Week in 
Los Angeles, and will be inaugurated the 
evening of May 19 with a parade of the 
musicians and artists of the city. Sunday, 
May 20. concerts will be held in Exposi- 
tion Park, Pershing Square, and Sycamore 
Grove. 

"pEODOR CHALIAPIN. the distinguished 
Russian singer-actor, will return to Los 
Angeles for one recital, Monday evening, 
May 14th, at the Philharmonic Auditorium. 
"DOSA PONSELLE. who appeared as co- 
star with Caruso at the Metropolitan 
Opera House four years ago, will give an 
unusually interesting program as her first 
Los Angeles appearance. May 7, at the 
Philharmonic Auditorium. This is the final 
concert of the Fitzgerald Concert Direc- 
tion, Merle Armitage, Manager. 

Announcements 

THE "Art of Gardens" will be told in an 

unusually attractive manner by Miss 
Frances Benjamin Johnston at Hotel Mary- 
land, Paadena, the evening of May 7. 
Miss Johnston ha s personally visited every 
American garden she describes and her 
slides are from her own photographs. 
OUSSELL V. BLACK left Los Angeles in 
1V April to attend the National City Plan- 
ning Conference at Baltimore, and will be 
gone until the middle of May. 
THE Calfornia Conference of Social Work 

will hold its convention in the Yosemite 
Valley this year. May 22 to May 25. Mrs. 
Elizabeth McManus is regional vice-presi- 
dent of Southern California and is endeav- 
oring to build up the state conferences 
with meetings through the year of local 
sections as well as one big annual meeting. 
THROUGH the month of May an exhibit 

of old English and Irish silver, collected 
during the past year by a member of the 
firm of A. Schmidt and Son, of New York, 
will be held in their Pergola Shop of the 
Hotel Maryland, Pasadena. The exhibit 
contains many historic pieces from the 
oldest families in England, some from the 
collection of the Countess of Essex, others 
from the Duchess of St. Albans, Lady 
Couts, and Lord Hastings. 
TAU BETA PI men were especially wel- 

corned by members of California Beta 
at an exhibit of buildings and equipment 
given by the Faculty and Students of the 
California Institute of Technology at Pasa- 
dena, Friday and Saturday, April 20 and 
21. An interesting program lasted from 
1 p. m. Friday to 2 p. m. Saturday. 

The laboratories of physics, chemistry, 
electrical engineering, mechanical engineer- 
ing, civil engneering, military engineer- 
ing, steam and hydraulics, and aeronautics 
were open for inspection, and demonstra- 
tions given in all departments of the in- 
stitute. 

The California Institute of Technology 
is located at California Street and Wilson 
Avenue, Pasadena. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



QANTA BARBARA has undertaken to or- 
° ganize a Summer School of the Arts of 
the Community Arts Association, with a 
corps of celebrated teachers in their vari- 
ous subjects, and to offer these courses at 
the lowest possible rates. Funds from the 
recent Carnegie grant of $1:25,000 are be- 
ing used to make this possible. The 
courses in music begin June 25, the dra- 
matic classes the middle of July, and the 
art classes early in June. 

'T'HE calendar of the Community Players 
of Pasadena, in the Community Play- 
house for May is : April 30-May 5, "Boy 
o' Dreams." by Octavia Harris. May 14-19, 
first annual musical extravaganza, "Com- 
munity Caper," words by Alfred Brand, 
music by Raymond Mixsell. 

TyriSS JULIE H. HEYNAMAN, who is on 
her way to New York to attend the 
general meeting of the English Speaking 
Union, was in Los Angeles on April 27th 
and addressed the women members of the 
E. S. U. after luncheon at the City Club, 
756 South Broadway. Miss Heynaman is 
the honorable secretary of the California 
Branch and is most anxious to increase 
the membership in Southern California, 
and to cause a more active interest in 
the Union. 

fpHE Assistance League of Southern Cali- 
fornia has now combined its Loca- 
tion Bureau, Thrift Shoppe, and Woman's 
Exchange in the Community House, cor- 
ner St. Andrews and De Longpre Avenue, 
Hollywood. Telephone 435133. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the Assistance 
League will be held on the first Tuesday 
of each month and will be called promptly 
at 10 :30 a. m. 

TXTORD has recently been received that 
twenty-five countries are now repre- 
sented in the International Junior Red 
Cross. Through this international corre- 
spondence the children of the world are 
weaving a web of friendship which should 
make for world peace in the coming gen- 
eration. California has a large part in 
this program. The Junior Red Cross is 
an organization in the schools and has 
marked educational value. 

•pDOUARD BAILLAUD. director of the 
Observatory of Paris, has been awarded 
the Bruce gold medal of the Astronomical 
Society of the Pacific, being the third 
Frenchman to receive this honor. It was 
conferred at the American Embassy in 
Paris by Ambassador Herrick. 



M 1 LOWE 



6100 Feet in Skyland 

America's Most Scenic 
Mountain Trolley Trip 

Fare $2.50 

From Los Angeles 
$2.10 from Pasadena 

A Year 'Round Resort — 
Delightful at All Seasons 

Five — Trains Daily — 8, 9, 
10 a. m., 1 :30, 4 p. m. 

From Main Street Station, 
Los Angeles 

Write for illustrated folder 



PA C I F 1 C 
ELECTRIC 
RAILWAY 

O. A. Smith 
Passenger Traffic Manager 
Los Angeles 



California Southland 



M. Urmy Seares 

Ellen Leech - 



Editor and Publisher 
- Assistant Editor 



No. 41 



MAY, 1923 




CONTENTS 



PAGE 

The History of Architecture, Series A, No. 1 Cover Design 

(Issued by the Allied Architects of Los Angeles) 

The Bridges, Pasadena Contents Design 

(Wctddell and Harrington, Ka>isus City, Builders of the High 
Bridge; Myron Hunt and H. C. Chambers, Builders of the 
Low Bridge. Drawing by Harold Bryant Cody.) 

The Pasadena Civic Center Hiram W. Wads worth 6 

The Civic Auditorium and City Hall, San Francisco 8 and 9 

The Los Angeles Administrative Center Cook and Hall 9 

Some Hillside and Water Gardens Helen Deusner 11 

Replanning a Mission Town Russel Van Nest Black 13 

Southland Opinion 14-15 

Architecture, Building, Current Events, 

Street Congestion Samuel Storrow 

The Garden Clubs of America Helen Leech lti-17 

Bulletin of the Architectural Club 18-19 

The Small House Service 19 

The Community Hospital M. Urmy Seares 20 

The Municipal Plunge H. G. Brigham 20 

The Hillside House in California 21 

(Webber, Staunton and Spaulding, Arch.) 

Testing Materials in C. I. T Franklin Thomas 

Birds in Our Gardens Theresa Hornet Patterson 

Music in the Public Schools H. H. Peck 

A House with a Foreign Influence Margaret Craig 

The Epicure's Pantry Maitre Cammille 

The Craft of Chasing Carl Van Dugteren 

The Money Market Leslie B. Henry 

This Magazine is the Official Organ of the Architectural Club of 
Los Angeles, California. 

CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND is published monthly at Pasadena, Cal. 

One dollar and twenty cents for six issues, two dollars for twelve 
For extra copies or back numbers call Main U08U, L. A. News Co. 

Copyrighted. 1023. by M. Urmv Seares 

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statement ok the ownership, MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION. ETC.. 
REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, OF 
CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND. PUBLISHED BY M. URMY SEARES, AT 
PASADENA. CALIFORNIA, FOR APRIL. 1923. 

State of California, County of Los Angeles. 

Before me, a Notary Public In and for the State and County aforesaid, per- 
sonally appeared Mabel Urmy Seares, who. having been duly sworn according to 
law, deposes and says that she is the editor and manager of California Southland, 
and that the following is a true statement of the ownership, management, circu- 
lation, etc., of the aforesaid publication, for the date shown in the above caption; 
that the name and address of the publisher, editor and manager is M. Urmy 
Seares ; that the owner of said publication is M. Urmy Seares ; that there are no 
mortgages, bondholders, or other security holders, owning or holding one per cent 
of the bonds, mortgages or other securities of California Southland. Sworn to 
subscribed before me this thirty-first day of March. 1923. 

JOHN R. BRAGDON, Notarj Public. 



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CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF NATIONAL INTEREST 



THE CITY PLANS OF PASADENA 



By HIRAM W. WADSWORTH 

Chairman of the Board of City Directors 



PASADENA like Topsy "jest growed"; fortunately the result as 
a whole has not become seriously bad. Located on the southern 
slope of the "mother mountains," Pasadena basks in the balmy sun- 
shine of winter and rejoices in the summer in the fresh day breezes 
from the ocean and the soothing- evening currents from the mountain 
sides and canons. Here has developed a city known throughout the 
whole country and across the seas as a city of homes, a city of schools 
and churches, a good city in which to live. Much has been written 
of its beauties, the attractiveness of its architecture and private 
grounds, both large and small, its educational institutions, its paved 
streets, its excellent water, light and sewer systems, its natural arroyo 
park, its flowers and trees, its canons and mountain background. 

It is realized that much of the beauty of the city is due to fortunate 
location and surroundings and the care and interest taken by the indi- 
vidual citizen in the development of his home. Comparatively little 
has been done as a municipality, especially along architectural devel- 
opment. 

An old Chinese proverb liberally translated reads something like 
this: "The first step is an important part of a walk of a hundred 
miles." Pasadena took the "first step" in systematic municipal devel- 
opment when about a year ago Dr. George E. Hale, director of the 



Mt. Wilson Observatory at Pasadena, outlined to the Board of City 
Directors his ideas as to the possibilities and benefits to be derived 
from a carefully devised and co-ordinated city plan. Dr. Hale was 
at once asked to present his views at a meeting held a few weeks 
later, at which were present delegates from most of the organizations 
of the city. The interest shown at this meeting was so great that the 
Board of City Directors acting under State law, immediately 
appointed a City Planning Commission which, after careful investiga- 
tion and deliberation, selected as consultants the firm of Bennett & 
Parsons of Chicago. 

A city plan is not confined to public buildings and their groupings, 
but is more comprehensive in its nature, and includes street widen- 
ings and openings, boulevards, local and interurban traffic, parks, 
housing, zoning, and other similar features. 

While the consulting architects have made a careful study and 
given much thought to all of these questions and their work is as 
yet unfinished, they have hastened, at the earnest solicitation of the 
Board of City Directors and the Planning Commission, the location 
and development of the Civic Center, because of the inadequacy 
of the present City Hall and Public Library and the immediate need 
of the buildings comprising this group. 




LOOKING EAST ALONG THE MESA ON WHICH PASADENA IS SITUATED. PERSPECTIVE OF THE NEW CITY PLAN. BENNETT AND PARSONS. CITY 
PLANNERS. COLORADO STREET, WITH ITS CAR LINES. BEGINS IN THE CENTER OF THE PICTURE AT A POINT NEAR THE PRESENT TRACKS OF THE 

SANTA FE RAILROAD. SEE PLAN ON FOLLOWING PAGE. 



s 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




The circulation of the public library is the highest per capita of 
any city of the size of Pasadena in the United States, and yet- 
the building is as it stood twenty years ago with about one-fifth 
the present population; the city hall has long since been more than 
filled and many departments have been housed in outside and unsatis- 



factory quarters; the city needs an auditorium and hall in which 
to hold conventions, drills, pageants, flower shows, concerts and lec- 
tures, and to provide a community center for all the people of the city. 

These buildings are an immense necessity to Pasadena. The public 
building group as outlined and illustrated, provides for them centrally 





THE CITY HALL IN SAN FRANCISCO'S CIVIC CENTER. BAKEWELL AND BROWN ARCHITECTS: BOTH ARE NATIVE CALIFORNIANS TRAINED AT THE 
UNIVERSITY OK CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, AND IN THE BEAUX ARTS. PARIS. PHOTOGRAPH BY GABRIEL MOULIN, SAN FRANCISCO. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



9 




THE AUDITORIUM AND POOL IN THE SAN FRANCISCO CIVIC CENTER. JOHN GALEN HOWARD, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ARCHITECTURAL 
DEPARTMENT, ARCHITECT. PHOTOGRAPHS BY COURTESY OF THE SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. 



and conveniently located, on property of comparatively low cost, and 
with due consideration for architectural effect and beauty. The 
plan is receiving the enthusiastic support of organizations and citi- 
zens, for they have adopted as their motto these words of that great- 
est of city planners, Daniel H. Bumham: "Make no little plans; 
they have no magic to stir men's blood and probably themselves will 



not be realized. Make big plans, aim high in hope and work, remem- 
bering that a noble, logical diagram once recorded will never die, 
but long after we are gone will be a living thing, asserting itself 
with ever-growing insistency. Remember that our sons and grand- 
sons are going to do things that would stagger us. Let your watch- 
word be order and your beacon beauty." 



AN ADMINISTRATIVE CENTER FOR LOS ANGELES 

PREPARED BY COOK AND HALL, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, IN CONSULTATION 
WITH THE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 



THE ideal Administrative Center (and by Administrative Center is 
meant the intelligent grouping of such buildings as comprise City 
Administration, County Administration, and where possible the State 
and Federal) should be so located in the city plan as to be readily 
accessible to the public who have business to transact; and yet an 
Administrative Center should never lie in the midst of traffic con- 
fusion. In other words, an Administrative Center having very large 
and special functions of its own should be somewhat set apart from 
ordinary business activities; should be planned to take care of diverse 
administrative functions efficiently and expeditiously in a location 
free from the confusion and congestion of city thoroughfares; and yet 
it must be readily accessible to the traveling public from the entire 
regional district. 

Conversely, an Administrative Center planned about the intersec- 
tion of two or more highways is sure to suffer in its special func- 
tions by traffic congestion unless very extensive reserve parking for 
automobiles can be provided, and seldom can such a location be ar- 
ranged to provide that intimate relationship between building groups 
as to develop an Administrative Center of Architectural merit. 

The site under consideration lies between First Street on the south, 
Sunset Boulevard on the north, Hill Street on the west, and Los 
Angeles Street on the east, a location of definite focal point when one 
thinks of the Greater Los Angeles with a metropolitan district that 
must eventually comprise the whole county. 

Our instructions upon undertaking this work were to preserve intact 
the historic Old Mission and the Plaza, were to consider the present 
Federal Building and the Hall of Records as fixtures, and were to 
recognize the New Hall of Justice as located at the intersection of 



Broadway and Temple Streets. 

Based on our study of the site and its topography, in relation to 
the city plan, we became convinced that the present Broadway tunnel 
is inadequate in serving the vast volume of travel that even today 
collects at Sunset Boulevard and North Broadway intersection. An 
open cut in order to make Broadway a street of 100 foot width is, in 
our opinion, a public traffic necessity. Through traffic and ordinary 
business travel require that Broadway and Main Street become in- 
creasingly great arteries of travel, and Main Street should be wid- 
ened to at least 100 foot width. 

We also became convinced that future travel needs would re- 
quire the continuation of Spring Street to an intersection with 
Sunset Boulevard, where a Plaza or Concourse should be de- 
veloped to care for the great accumulation of travel at this crucial 
point in the street system. Whether or not a Union Station is devel- 
oped at the site shown on our plans, it should be recognized that a 
broadening of Sunset Boulevard to create a generous Plaza at the 
intersection of these streets is essential to traffic circulation. 

Our plans were developed during several months of intensive study 
involving the construction of a model to ensure an intelligent concep- 
tion of space composition between the building groups and the open 
areas. Many consultations were held with Mr. Sumner P. Hunt, 
Chairman of the City Planning Commission, and Mr. Gordon Whit- 
nall, Secretary of the County Commission, including conferences with 
the Building Committee of the City Planning Commission. 

In March resolutions were passed by the City Planning Commis- 
sion approving the scheme as then drawn in relation to street circu- 
lation, proposed grouping of public buildings, and the engineering 



to 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




solution of the problem which took into consideration the existing hill 
in the vicinity of Fort Moore Place, and created an Administrative 
Center of unusual individuality. 

Without going into a detailed description of a technical nature at 
this time, we would point out some of the salient features of cur 
planning, which has carefully considered the street circulation, with 
extensive parkings for automobiles as distinct from the through 
streets, and has created a relationship between the proposed building 
masses and the open spaces that we feel sure will create a happy 
composition of the whole. It should be understood, however, that 
our perspective drawing of the Administrative Center is not more 
than a suggestive interpretation of the architecture, which is a fac- 



tor that must be most carefully studied in relation to each building 
and its relation to every other building in the Center. 

Taking advantage of the higher elevations that now exist between 
Temple Street and Sunset Boulevard in the central part of the area 
being considered, the scheme of design develops on the axis of Spring 
Street, an expanding view of the Administrative Center from a 
point considerably south of First Street, and this view will be accumu- 
lative in its effect as one travels for some 1200 feet into the Adminis- 
trative Center on a slightly rising street gradient. A few hundred 
feet north of Temple Street on the axis of Spring Street a double 
entrance street portal of architectural merit would lead into the sub- 
way with large overhead openings (balustraded) to provide ventila- 




CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



11 



tion and sunlight. This subway, some 700 feet in length, would open 
out on the Sunset Boulevard Plaza, and would provide a great artery 
for though travel without in any way creating congestion within the 
Administrative Center. At an elevation of approximately 23 feet 
above the pavement of the subway would lie a plaza or parterre 
300 feet wide and 600 feet long about which would be grouped in 
the probable near future a new Federal building, a State building, 
and what we have termed the "Courts." The proposed Hall of Justice 
and the present Federal building would also share by looking out 
upon this parterre, which would act as a pleasant concourse for 
pedestrians having business between the several building groups. 
Being free from the noise and confusion of automobiles, we believe 
this parterre with its enclosure of fine architecture will develop an 
Administrative Center grouping of distinct individuality and great 
attractiveness. 

We have spoken of the aim to create an expanding view of the 
Administrative Center to one approaching from the south on Spring 
Street and would point out that a strong terminal building located 
some 1800 feet from First Street would become a most impressive 
note in the picture. The City Hall located in a flanking position 
would stand as an extremely important factor in the Administrative 
Center and would be the most impressive building as one entered the 
Center from the south. With its southern facade overlooking the 
parklike entrance into the Center, and with generous lawns and 
planted foreground in connection with the Spring and Main Street 
facades, the prominence of the City Hall site must be recognized as 



being secondary to no building in the Center. It should also be 
noted that its location in close proximity to First Street, Spring 
Street and Main Street, with the extensive reserve parking for 
auomobiles as an essential part of the plan, ensures an accessibility 
to the City Hall by the traveling public that leaves nothing to be 
desired. 

In view of the fact that the citizens of Los Angeles will be asked 
to select a site for the City Hall, and we have heard it expressed 
by those who have not made a study of city planning that an 
Administrative Center should properly be in the business district, we 
would make the following statement: Experience in city planning 
and a study of land valuations leads to the general conclusion that 
when Administrative Centers, or City Halls, are placed in the active 
business districts they tend to arrest the upward trend of property 
values in their neighborhood, whereas if Administrative Centers are 
located as an adjunct to the recognized business district they at once 
tend to stabilize, and frequently to increase, the property values. 

It is our firm conviction that economy, convenience, and efficiency 
all point to the wisdom of locating the City Hall in close proximity 
to existing County buildings; and that intelligent city planning for 
the future demands a comprehensive Administrative Center plan, 
as now unanimously approved by the City Planning Commission, in 
order to determine the wise location of City, County, State and Fed- 
eral buildings. 

Cook and Hall, 

Landscape Architects and City Planners, Los Angeles, California. 



GARDENS ARE THE GLORY OF A CITY OR TOWN 

By HELEN DEUSNER, Landscape Architect 



I THINK that in California, as in Italy, the most beautiful of our 
larger gardens are, and will be, hillside gardens. One should not 
undertake the development of such a garden without a liberal appro- 
priation in one's budget, but given that, a good architect and land- 



scape architect, and taste, or at least appreciation of taste, in the 
client, and the results, in California, are most delightful. Myron 
Hunt has seized them in several of his notable pieces of work, one 
of which is the Loring garden in San Rafael Hills, illustrated below. 








THE HILLSIDE GARDEN OF MRS. F. L. LORING. SAN RAFAEL HEIGHTS. PASADENA, MYRON HUNT, ARCHITECT. ALTHOUGH HE HAS BUILT MOST OF 
THE IMPORTANT ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES NOW WORTHY OF REPRODUCING BY PHOTOGRAPHY, THROOP HALL AT C. I. T., THE LIBRARY AT THE 
OBSERVATORY ON SANTA BARBARA STREET, PASADENA, THE STADIUM IN THE ARROYO AND THE HOSPITAL ANNEX. BESIDES THE LOVELIEST OF 
PERGOLA STORES AT THE MARYLAND HOTEL, MR. HUNT FINDS HIS GREATEST PERSONAL PLEASURE IN CREATING GARDENS, WHICH HAVE BEEN 
SHOWN ALL OVER THE COUNTRY IN THE PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK OF MISS JOHNSTON, FROM WHOSE COLLECTION THIS FINE PRINT WAS CHOSEN. 



12 CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



Clutton-Broek in his "Studies in Gardening" says: "A great part 
of the beauty of good formal gardening comes from the contrast 
between the limited and unchanging forms of things that are made 
by man, and the variety and increasing changes of plant life." 
Somehow this contrast never appears more invitingly than in the 
forms that appear in hillside gardening: balustrades and walls, 
flights of steps, pools, and wall-fountains, and seats from which to 
view the country spreading below. The spires of cypress, the masses 
and sprays of vine, the formal clipped things, seem, with this back- 
ground, to fall into peculiarly interesting composition. Perhaps, too, 
it is the rhythm suggested by the descint of stair-steps that gives 
such happy rhythm to our perception. 

We see these elements again in the lovely garden built by Green 
& Green, architects for the home of the Misses Culbertson, now 
owned by Mr. and Mrs. Prentice of Hillcrest Drive, Pasadena. 

But to the person whose garden is on level ground there remains 
the very satisfying beauty of pool and fountain in lovely settings. My 
observation of the effect of completeness which is given to a garden 
by a really beautiful "garden figure" makes me feel keenly the corre- 
sponding emptiness in gardens where there is no such focus of inter- 
est. It is like a house without a child. Such figures are best, of 
course, when designed for the particular place, as were the two of 
Maud Daggetts' here illustrated. 

But even without the figure, the pool of beautiful proportion makes 
a beautiful and serene picture, as shown by the garden designed by 
Florence Yoch, landscape architect, for Mrs. Howard Huntington. 



/// the garden below the owner 
has used to great advantage the 
beautiful hedge of Monterey 
Cypress trees planted by the 
city of Pasadena around a res- 
ervoir. Miss Daggett's charm- 
ing little Pan forms the central 
note. Garden of Mr. and Mrs. 
Myron I lit /if. Pasadena. Photo- 
graph by Frances B. Johnston. 



A delightful fountain in un- 
glazed terracotta, placed in the 
garden of Mr. Edward link- 
bine. Oak Knoll, Pasadena, 
where it is weathering and col- 
oring beautifully. Maud Dag- 
get, Sculptor. Oast by The. 
Italian Terra Cotta Company. 
Helen Deusner, L a n d s cape 
Architect. 






A PASADENA GARDEN IN WHICH ART AND NATURE COMBINE TO MAKE THE HILLSIDE LOVELY AND LIVABLE. GREEN AND GREEN ARCHITECTS. 

PHOTOGRAPHED BY FRANCES BENJAMIN JOHNSTON. 



REPLANNING A MISSION CITY 



THE padre founders of the mission communities were city planners. 
They dreamed not of great cities, but of peaceful, inspirational 
communities, wherein a few thousand might find prosperity and 
happiness. Up and down the coast the padres journeyed afoot, 
seeking sites fitted to their needs. They selected well. San Diego, 
San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara, and Monterey! There are no 
more favorable townsites on all that six hundred miles of coast from 
Mexico to the Golden Gate and the Bay of San Francisco. Each 
had the grandeur of the mountains and the sea, ideal climate, fertile 
lands, and an ocean at its door reaching out to the commerce of 
the world. 

For many years the mission communities prospered peacefully 
in their favored places. Then gold opened the doors of the West 
and the loveliness of these sequestered villages was discovered. A 
highway, then a railway, came and with them, a new prosperity 
bringing great populations to those cities more directly in the path 
of the tide and a more modest growth to those communities such as 
San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara, and Monterey with their charm 
and fertile lands as their chief asset. 

But sadly enough, in no one of these cities was the same vision 
that inspired its founding carried on through its new growth. Streets 
were laid out gridiron fashion over valley and hill alike. The revival 
came at a time when American cities were growing rapidly but badly. 
The towns so well founded by the padres and having such large poten- 
tial possibilities suffered accordingly. The individuality of their re- 
spective sites was little recognized. Their new plans, if they can 
be called plans, wiuld have been just as adaptable to the plains of 
Nebraska as to the foothills of the Sierra Madres. 

It may be that so little thought was given to the capitalization 
of the natural beauties and advantages of the sites because these 
beauties and advantages were so many. No matter how or where 
the streets went, the mountains and the sea, the climate, and the 
fertility of the soil remained. And so it is that, altlnugh these 
lovely mission cities have not experienced the best possible extension 
of their streets or the most agreeable relative use of their lands, they 
are still most attractive and picturesquely beautiful. They have not 
been spoiled and now they are come upon a new era. 

New vision is being employed in restoration, alteration, and growth. 
The appeal of these cities is increasng year by year. They are 



% RUSSELL VAN NEST BLACK 

growing. They will continue to grow, not all, perhaps, into great 
cities, but most of them, more likely, into that sort of creation 
which has just as much a place in this cosmos of American communi- 
ties as the big city and that the prosperous community of thirty, 
forty, or fifty thousand people with some industry and some com- 
merce, "but with its livableness always as its chief asset. Such a 
community as this San Buenaventura promises to be. 

(Continued on Page 25) 




POOL IN THE GARDEN OF MRS. HOWARD HUNTINGTON, OAK KNOLL. 
PASADENA, CALIFORNIA. FLORENCE YOCH, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT. 



14 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



SOUTHLAND 



Architecture 

THE American Institute of Architects was founded in 
1857. It is organized under the laws of the State of 
New York and its headquarters are in the Old Octagon 
House in Washington, D. C. It operates through the local 
groups of architects known as chapters and its object is to 
unite in fellowship the architects of the United States that 
the aesthetic, scientific and practical efficiency of the pro- 
fession may be maintained and made of ever increasing 
service and value to society. A board of nine directors 
performs its executive work between conventions. Mr. 
Edwin Bergstrom of Los Angeles is the director represent- 
ing the Southwestern States and California. 

The City of Los Angeles and the centers of population 
near it owe much to Mr. Edwin Bergstrom. Quiet and 
genial, with unswerving adherence to the ideal of the Insti- 
tute, he has maintained its principles of education and 
harmonious co-operation with the engineering profession 
and constructional groups to better working conditions and 
give counsel and advice to public bodies during a time when 
the rest of Los Angeles was overwhelmed by the great 
tide of immigration which has had to be housed. 

The Southern California Chapter, founded in 1894 by 
such men as Mr. Sumner Hunt, its present president, and 
now chairman of the City Planning Commission, has a 
roster of 84 institute members and 34 associate members. 
Active for many years in this chapter are John Austin, who 
built the new high school, and John Parkinson, the adminis- 
tration building, U. S. C, and the amphitheater. 

Among the institute members are other names which 
are recognized all over the country and in Europe when 
California architecture is mentioned. Mr. Myron Hunt, 
president of the Southern California Chapter at one time, 
is thought of first in his widespread and inspiring influence 
not only on the men and women working here for a better, 
finer architecture, but also on the actual appearance of the 
cities and towns now rising. The great tourist hotels have 
been saved from commonplace appearance by his superb 
talent for combining good proportions with practical de- 
tails. The colleges and divers institutions springing up 
to grace this new country have laid fine foundational plans 
because Myron Hunt, a resident of this young state, has 
gone out of his own individual way to study their prob- 
lems and to seek in every civilized, historic group of build- 
ings a wise solution for California conditions and environ- 
ment. He is not alone in this subordination of self to the 
gaining of the best for California, but he is the first to 
whom everybody goes for advice and help. And somehow 
through all his busy hours, superior to demands of his 
large organization, he finds time to be kind and to answer 
all sorts of questions with the touchstone of high art and 
integrity. 

Allison and Allison, supreme in a wonderful combina- 
tion of business acumen and trained sense in architectural 
fitness, have set the schoolhouses of California so high 
that the world is looking at them and have built our most 
notable building of the year, the University Club. 

Farquhar, another Beaux Arts man, found opportunity 
to collect examples of all the arts and combine them for 
all time in a private mausoleum at Hollywood. 

Carleton Winslow, after his work at San Diego World's 
Fair, has laid the touch of his genius upon our Spanish 
building and saved us from mediocritw Pierpont Davis, 
W. J. Dodd, H. C. Chambers, William L. Woollett, Harwood 
Hewitt, Elmer Grey, Stiles Clements, Winsor Soule in Santa 
Barbara, Marston and Van Pelt in Pasadena, Reginald 
Johnson wherever in this country fine domestic architecture 
is demanded, these, our architects, are called to build 
dwellings in the fine reserved style developed here out of 
the varied tastes of a varied people. 

Besides the Chapter there are in Los Angeles two active 
forces in architecture. The Association of Allied Archi- 
tects which has for its object the concerted offering of the 



best service in the building of civic Los Angeles: Mr. Ed- 
ward Bergstrom is President and all leading architects have 
been invited to join this highly altruistic service. The 
Architectural Club of Los Angeles, whose Bulletin appears 
on another page, comprises the men already mentioned and 
a host of eager students led by that indomitable worker and 
talented architect, Clifford A. Truesdell, Jr., whose letter 
confirming the action of the Club makes California South- 
land its official organ. His ideals expressed in the Bulletin, 
the Atelier and more especially in the Department of 
Architecture which he organized at the University of Cali- 
fornia in Hollywood, mean much for the future of our 
architecture. 

Centralizing Los Angeles 

DOWNTOWN real estate and building construction in- 
volving more than $10,000,000 and anchoring the 
financial center of the city have been undertaken as a result 
of a contract worked out by the Pacific-Southwest Trust & 
Savings Bank, Desmond's and the Columbia Investment 
Company. Under the plans, the Pacific-Southwest's Trust 
& Savings Bank will build a new Class A eleven story unit 
next to its present banking quarters and on the ground now 
occupied by Desmonds — in order to more than double its 
present banking quarters. The first and second floors of 
the new building will be occupied by the bank, while the 
nine stories above will be given over to general office use. 

The new bank building to be constructed will follow the 
lines of the present Trust & Savings Building and will con- 
stitute an additional unit of that building. On the north 
the new unit of the bank building will join the buildings to 
be constructed by the Mercantile Arcade Realty Company, 
and an arcade from Sixth Street will connect with an arcade 
to be built over Mercantile Place. 

As soon as the new Desmond building on Broadway can 
be erected, the present structure occupied by Desmond's 
will be wrecked and the new bank building will be built 
thereon. This construction follows directly in line with 
the construction of the arcade over Mercantile Place. Mer- 
cantile Place arcade will consist of two twelve story Class 
A buildings facing on Spring Street and on Broadway, re- 
spectively, with a three story arcade between. 

The Trust & Savings building, which is one of the out- 
standing architectural features of the city, is inadequate 
for the present needs of the Pacific-Southwest Trust & Sav- 
ings Bank. 

Much of the executive work of the entire Pacific-South- 
west Trust & Savings Bank group of banks is at present 
crowded into the present Trust & Savings Building, and the 
building of a second unit of this structure will enable the 
bank to handle its business in a much more efficient manner. 
When all of these new buildings are completed there will 
be two hundred and forty feet of frontage from the corner 
of Sixth and Spring north, improved with twelve-story 
buildings, which will materially change the sky-line of the 
vicinity and more than ever tend to centralize the banking 
interests of Los Angeles. 

Street Congestion 

THE traffic problem in Los Angeles is receiving a great 
deal of study. The traffic problem in our smaller cities 
and especially here in Pasadena requires immediate at- 
tention. 

Nearly all accidents are due to non-compliance with sim- 
ple and well established "Rights of the Road." Automo- 
biles and street cars are not allowed on the sidewalk but 
pedestrians must necessarily cross the streets. Street cars 
should have the unobstructed right of way over the rails. 
Automobiles wander about the streets almost without re- 
straint, but should be severely penalized when they do not 
stay in the traffic lane which pertains to their right of way, 
or when they do not recognize the standard "Rules of the 
Road" and the rights of the pedestrians to share the cross- 
ings with all other kinds of traffic. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



15 




Our annual Tournament of Roses is always a time of 
great traffic congestion, and last New Year's proved that 
the design of handling the traffic and the police control 
were utterly inadequate. 

The first essential of traffic control is a few rules so 
simple as to be understood by anybody physically capable 
of being on the street, and then the rigid enforcement of 
these rules without fear or favor. The principal of traffic 
rules is to expedite traffic and not to delay traffic, to have 
always a place where the street car, automobile or pedes- 
trian can go without danger of collision. The control may 
be a human traffic director or by physical structures that 
will physically direct the traffic and by penalties which are 
sure and certain and increasingly severe for violations of 
the rules. 

The traffic officer at the crossing should be a director of 
traffic and not, as is usually the case, merely a human sema- 
phore. He should direct traffic so that it will make the 
least possible stops and so that it will not interfere with 
other vehicles or pedestrians any more than is absolutely 
necessary, and so that vehicles turning at intersections 
shall not interfere with each other. The officer should be, 
but seldom is, a director and should not be, but generally is, 
interested only in "calling down" or tagging automobiles. 

No automobile, making either the right or left turn, need 
cross in front of another machine, so as to cause delay. This 
is demonstrated every day at the crowded intersections of 
New York and other large eastern cities. There is seldom 
need or advantage, and usually disadvantage, in requiring 
automobiles to pass over crossings single file. 

Our streets are made for traffic and not for parking pur- 
poses. The object of traffic is to get as rapidly as possible 
from starting to destination, at no time interfering with 
other traffic on the street. 

The problem of our New Year's day traffic does not seem 
at all difficult to a trained mind, but it will again end in 
disaster if the attempt is again made to leave it in the con- 
trol largely of the automobilists themselves or to force an 
unusual type of handling by police, however intelligent, who 
are not working systematically and are not trained to ac- 
complish results but only trained to penalize offenders. 

If we had islands of safety for street-car passengers at 
all ccrners of the congested section, and then not merely 
permit, but oblige automobiles to pass those islands in as 
many streams of traffic as the width of the street would 
permit, including a line of vehicles on the car tracks as is 
done in most cities, we would have in the congested district 
three streams of traffic moving at the signal instead of one 
stream as at the present time. The same amount of traffic 
would take less than one-third as long to cross the inter- 
secting street. At the same time we should require all 
automobiles making the right hand turn to be in the right 
hand lane, and all automobiles making the left hand turn 
to be in the left hand lane, thus preventing a turning auto- 
mobile from interfering with one desiring to go straight 
ahead. These islands and lanes should be so built as to 
force the automobiles to obey the rules of these points. The 
islands should be marked with concrete blocks that would 
absolutely stop any car failing to obey the rule. The lane 
between the island and the curb should be marked by signs 
standing five feet high, similar in general design to "Keep 
to the Right" signs now commonly seen, and if necessary 
these could be reinforced with a low concrete curb. Tem- 
porarily all this work could be done by sacks of gravel and 
cheap signs. We should try out the experiment on about 
six important intersections where traffic officers are on 
duty and gradually extending the control to the more im- 
portant crossings which are not now, and need not be, pro- 
vided with traffic officers, if this mechanical control is put 
in operation. The essence of this idea is that the officer 
should, but does not, direct. He is merely a human sema- 
phore, while these islands and lanes would positively re- 
quire any automobile desiring to pass them to obey the rule 
and not "hog the road." 

Samuel Storrow, 
831 Black Building, Los Angeles. 



The Changing British Empire 

IT was interesting to hear, at the Tuesday lecture of the 
Current Events Club, the facts of British history as 
they present themselves to a Britisher. 

Educated Americans, whether engaged in world work 
abroad, or, as a nation sitting energetically on the grand 
stand of public opinion at home, are watching, with a sub- 
conscious desire for fair play, whatever of interest is going 
on in the world. The changing British Empire is the most 
active force in the world today. Its reaction upon the 
varied peoples with whom it comes in contact is the most 
interesting world game now in season. This, perhaps, is 
the answer to the speaker's gentle suggestion that America 
has imperial matters of her own. 

Whatever imperialism may have been "wished onto" us 
by our fight with Spain has died a natural death in the 
terrible exhibition of Germany's ambition in a similar direc- 
tion. Had America remained purely a British colony, our 
talents for pioneering might have carried us overseas after 
we have trekked across our own continent ; but the land, 
as our pioneers of British blood have passed and left it 
open for settlement, has been filled with other races to whom 
our public schools are now teaching English. New England 
moved to the Western Reserve and New England states 
are no longer New England. Through Indiana and Ohio, 
New England's sons have gone to settle Iowa and Kansas, 
Michigan, Missouri, Texas. For, augmented by discreet 
conquistadores from the old South, these scouts and com- 
panies of American pioneers have conquered with their 
British blood and brawn the Rockies and Sierras and now 
stand on the Pacific shore in California, Oregon and Wash- 
ington, facing the Orient on the West, as their brothers of 
the British Empire face it on the East — but not for con- 
quest or imperial domination. 

That part of the American people which turned from the 
interesting exploit of conquering a continent to help stop 
the foul blows which were raining upon Belgium, France, 
and England (and California turned quickest) has gone 
back to its work of mastering the forces of nature; but it 
carries in its heart forever the song of the Declaration of 
Independence, "Free and equal, free and equal" — sung like 
a chant as we tramp along our way. Facing the Orient, 
we do not decline "the white man's burden" offered us by 
Britain, for it has been placed on our shoulders by immi- 
gration. We are anxious to hear all about it. We listened 
with tense effort to every incisive, clear-cut word packed 
with meaning as its pure English enunciation snapped from 
the lips of the speaker and charmed our ears grown dulled 
with slouchy speech. 

Mr. Ratcliffe was surprised, he said, to find on this far 
California coast so much of interest in Great Britain. It is 
the game in which our interest is centered. We are in- 
tensely glad to get the British point of view and we care 
more to hear our mother tongue well spoken than we do to 
listen to the other side set forth its plea in maimed and 
broken English. But the games we like best have all two 
sides. We like to see the best team win, and tolerance with 
us has grown to be a river undermining the foundations of 
our missionary spirit. We do not crave to "set the captives 
free" in Hindustan or Turkey. How can we? They are free 
and equal now according to the doctrine which we chant in 
chorus. Shall we make them any more so if we club them 
into being Methodists? — or Presbyterians? — or Baptists? 



One Kingdom, One People 

OUR Father, which art in Heaven, Hallowed be Thy 
Name. Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done on 
earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread 
and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who 
trespass against us. Lead us not into temptation; but 
deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the 
power, and the glory, forever and ever. Amen, 



16 



CALIFORNIA SOUTH LA N D 



THE GARDEN CLUBS AND THEIR OBJECT ellen leech 




ENTRANCE TO THE HOME OK MRS. JOSEPH BARNES. IN SAN RAFAEL HEIGHTS, 
WHOSE GARDEN WANDERS UP HILL AND DOWN DALE. 

C1ARDEN CLUBS are, for many reasons, totally distinct from other 
I organizations known as clubs. In the first place a clubhouse is 
unnecessary as the gardens of the members furnish the very appropri- 
ate meeting ground, and there is never a drive for members on, as usually, 
and always since the organization of a club in Pasadena, there has 
been a waiting list. 

The creed of the garden club is so encompassing that the size of 
the member's garden, nor its pretentions, has anything to do with 
the entrance; it is merely that one must believe in and live up to its 
object, which "shall be to increase the practical knowledge and love 
of gardening through association, conference, and correspondence; to 
secure the protection and propagation of native plants and trees, and 
to stimulate and encourage civic planting." 

Gardens take so often the place of friends; not that the owners 
become recluses by any means, or neglect their human friends for the 
flowers, but each growing thing means a new life interest, and an addi- 
tional spark of love is kindled around it that the little thing just bursting 
through the sod may find itself within a sheltered circle, and have this 
enveloping shield in which to unfold until its own sturdiness carries it on 
triumphantly to its fulfillment. This may answer the question, "Why 
are garden club members so elusive?" They never prate of their accom- 
plishments, and rarely speak of the organization as a club unless there 





FUNTRIDGE HIGHLANDS. WHERE ALL THE LANDSCAPE IS A 
GARDEN. 

is a definite aim to be accomplished. Then they are fully 
alive to the object and its fruition. 

When a garden can romp riotously up and down a slope, 
or subside quietly into a green sward of lawn below the 
library window as if responding to the gradations of mood of 
the family desires, why shouldn't it be called a friend? If 
your garden shows temperament, wants to take things into its 
own hands occasionally and slip into paths, and even beds, 
intended for members of a different cult, why not — isn't that 
merely another trait of the humans with whom we make 
friends? 

One may have all kinds of gardens, there is no set rule 
by which a garden club member must plan and plant. It may 
follow geometrical lines, be enclosed within a garden wall, or 
even within the few feet allowed a city lot patio. It may amble 
along one side of a farmhouse, flanked by the kitchen vegetable 
garden, and peeping here and there into the orchard, the only 
requirement being that it is not neglected and is not only loved 
but worked ! 



A dtlail oi 
earden and 
swimmwii 
pool. 
Paul Thiene. 
Landscape 
Architect. 



The Lovely 

Eucalypti 

Repeating 

Themselvet 

in the Pm,l. 

Charles T. 

Adams, 

Landscape 

Architect. 





CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



17 




MISS FRANCES BENJAMIN JOHNSTON, WHOSE LOVE OF GARDENS IS 
ALL-EMBRACING AND WHO HAS PHOTOGRAPHED ALL THE HISTORIC 
GARDENS OF AMERICA. 

PLANNING and planting, seeding and weeding is the obvious 
history of a garden, but its real story is told in the lengthen- 
ing shadows on the lawn, the delicate tracery of sunbeams through 
a tangle of boughs and leaves, a tiny vine weaving from out its warp 
and woof the ethereal romance of the rose, and, maybe, the swift 
moving shadow of a bird in his flight. All of this elusive mystery 
was caught and held for us in the wonderful pictures of gardens shown 
by Miss Frances Benjamin Johnston, of New York and Washington, 
to the members and guests of the Friday Morning Club of Los 
Angeles as an event of Garden Week. As Miss Johnston has per- 
sonally visited most of the notable gardens of America, and as her 
slides are all from her own photographs she is able to give much of 
the art of gardens. The color in the reproductions is most satis- 
factory and is due to the interest and sympathetic understanding of 
Mrs. Grace Smith Anderson, whom Miss Johnston styles a "real 
collaborator." 

Miss Johnston emphasizes always the sheer beauty of gardens, 
and, naturally, to obtain this beauty there must be much work and 
much study of soil and conditions, but she supposes this to be 
understood and does not interpose a treatise on the chemical com- 
position of soils, nor a whiff cf remembrance of plant foods. She 
brings each garden she mentions so close to us, so relates it to 
another of dear memory that we find ourselves claiming a friend- 
ship with some of her friends before we realize what is happening. 
Vistas of possibilities are opened to all of us when, in speaking 
of the City Gardens Club of New York, Miss Johnston says, "When 
this organization first came to my attention I promptly joined the 
club, although my garden for the moment was limited to some aquatic- 
plants in a fish bowl and a thriving "hen and chickens" in a pot 
on the window ledge of an apartment ten stories up." We know 
she would understand and appreciate any effort, and extend a help- 
ing hand to the most amateurish but ambitious gardener. 

Show gardens add much to the beauty of the world and are 
provided for their owners in many instances with no outlay of 
thought or effort, other than the signing of many checks, but usually 
the perfect result is achieved through combining the knowledge of 
an experienced landscape architect with the enthusiasm, interest 
and love of the owner. After the plan has been successfully 
worked out and the garden on its way to maturity it becomes the 
sole property of the owner, and occasionally a change may be made 
here and there, but usually, even in the smallest garden plot, it is 
advisable to consult one who can speak with authority. 

Miss Johnston was the first woman photographer in Washington 
and perhaps her knowledge of people before the camera guided her in 
her sympathetic treatment of gardens, or could it have been the other 
way around? We will all admit posing the dignitaries of several ad- 
ministrations successfully, proves her capable of doing justice to a 
garden of any size or dimension. 



Each garden visited through the wonderful reproductions was 
so thoroughly satisfying it was impossible to escape seeking the 
reason, which was easily found in recognizing the following of the 
four fundamental rules governing garden making: Fitness, con- 
venience, privacy, and beauty. And the greatest of these is fitness. 
Just as a house must conform to its natural setting, so the garden 
must fit in with th_' house and the surroundings. We invariably 
plan an old-fashioned garden to complete a Colonial home, the 
English type for Tudor architecture, and may import a trig — even 
chic — little affair for our small French chateaus. 

A wandering garden is a delight, meandering here and there to 
the confines of the hedge-enclosed formal garden, with its carefully 
kept lawn and its bird bath to furnish life and animation. In 
another plot the rose garden, safe and serene in its own environ- 
ment, and beyond, on every side, the rollicking growth of beauty in 
every form and color, hit and miss, high or low, a dash of color 
under an oak and a waving mass of yellow from the topmost 
boughs. What individual pleasure may be found in the possession 
of an evergreen pomegranate bush, one that never grows dormant 
but blossoms and bears fruit throughout the entire year, regardless 
of the fact that no other member of the family is so prodigal of its 
blessings. It is probably frowned upon by the more sedate mem- 
bers of the tribe, if any shrub which bears such a wealth of color 
in blossoms and fruit can have dignified propensities, and has no 
doubt received parental lectures on waste and extravagance, in 
flower language of "burning the candle at both ends." And yet to 
the delight of its owner the bush goes blithely on shedding color 
and delight. 

If your garden were such a treasure trove as to hold a wee mite 
of a counsellor, who followed you around and gave suggestions 
from a tipping bough just over your head, or fluted a note of protest 
from the leaves almost under foot, wouldn't you enjoy talking back 
even if you were obliged to differ with him in regard to the planting. 
The shiny black head and strong markings of brown and white on 
the back would prove this latest member of the garden club to 
belong to the Tow-hee family which rarely makes friends with 
humans so readily but is a close confidant of the lady of one of 
our gardens. 




THE GARDEN OF MRS. PLINY WATSON. A BARE HILLSIDE EIGHTKKN 
YEARS AGO, NOW A MASS OF BLOOM UNDER TOWERING TREES. 



18 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



THE ARCHITECTURAL CLUB OF LOS ANGELES 

MONTHLY BULLETIN 



OFFICERS 

Clifford A. Truesdell, Jr., President 
Lloyd Rally, Vice-President 
Paul W. Penland, Secretary 
Roscoe E. Bowles, Treasurer 



n^HERE is a growing realization in the 
1 ranks of practicing architects that to sell 
architecture involves educating an apathetic 
public. The present day younger generation 
of that public are reached through the medium 
of high school and university courses labeled 
"Fine Arts," "Art Appreciation" and the like. 
We strive to teach the laymen through such 
organized publicity as the Allied Architects 
are now carrying on in local papers, but we 
do our teaching for the greater part as in- 
dividuals, and are forced to take our aver- 
age client and begin way back at the begin- 
ning. In the last analysis it falls largely, 
therefore, to the artist himself to create a 
demand for his art. Why? 

What percentage of architects are them- 
selves good designers? Good critics? Have 
good designers in their respective staffs? 
Look at the "Carpitecture," the comic opera 
art that literally straddles the Southland and 
yet bears the sign "Designed by a Certified 
Architect." Look at it and blush! True, we 
see less of it now than ten years ago. But 
why? 

Is it necessary in this enlightened day and 
age to argue for the University? Who is it 
that for the far greater part has brought the 
few gems, comparatively speaking, of real 
architecture that stand out beacon-like in the 
Southland? Who for the greater part is win- 
ning the institute medals? Who are the de- 
signers in practically every good office in the 
City of Los Angeles? Need more be said for 
the University? 

About seven years ago the first university 
course in architecture was offered at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California. It looked 
splendid — on paper. Two years ago a second 
course modeled somewhat after the Eastern 
"Special Courses" was opened for such dis- 
abled veterans as were government students 
at the Southern Branch of the University of 
California. Since that time each school has 
grown by leaps and bounds. Each has gained 
from the impetus of its friendly rival. The 
majority of the students of both schools are 
members of the Architectural Club of Los 
Angeles. The two faculties are working to- 
gether for common ends. While there was 
but one school, progress was ineonsequental. 
Could more be said for the need of two 
schools? 

There is a third school here interested in 
architecture, which is fortunately but a short 
distance from our center of population. Cali- 
fornia Institute of Technology seems destined 
to become the big technical school of the West. 
Blessed with wonderful equipment, testing 
laboratories and the like, it even now offers 
great opportunity for research and will un- 
doubtedly become in time the big Western 
University for Structural Engineers. 

The Atelier of the Architectural Club will 
always hold its peculiar place in the business 
of architectural education — a sort of post 
graduate school of design. In the T-Square 
Club at Philadelphia worked side by side grad- 
uates of the leading universities of the East 
with draftsmen of no collegiate training. 
Each gained from the other, and so will al- 
ways gain. Graduates of the local architec- 
tural courses will soon be coming to the Club 
Atelier to continue the study of design while 
getting their initial office experience in the 
city. Will the club be prepared to receive 
them? 

Both of the local schools are now going 
through the trying period of organization in 
the business of building up architectural 
courses, libraries and faculties. Despredelles 
and Crets will arrive when the schools are 
big enough to warrant them and the profes- 
sion evinces enough interest to indicate that 
ic deserves them. Neither of the local schools 









n n n n n 


1 


I 












has an Architectural Library worth mention- 
ing. Architectural Libraries are exceedingly 
expensive and University Library funds un- 
believably limited, and with numerous de- 
partments to serve. The cost of many an 
architectural book would buy a hundred vol- 
umes for the ordinary academic department. 
To expect these universities to build up Archi- 
tectural libraries for themselves is to antici- 
pate that which has' practically no precedent. 
Private donations have established the nu- 
cleus of most of the Architectural Libraries 
in the country. 

The Architectural Club receives demands 
daily for draftsmen from exasperated archi- 
tects. Even though it is carrying advertise- 
ments in local and Eastern papers, it is un- 
able to supply these demands. Should those 
who do practically nothing towards making 
draftsmen be particularly pitied when they 
must take many men who can barely draw 
lines and make the best of them as archi- 
tectural draftsmen? Is it not easier to make 
a draftsman from a college architectural 
graduate than from a man entirely without 
professional training? How many offices in 
Los Angeles have the time now to train men? 

There are apparently at least four institu- 
tions of higher learning in Southern Cali- 
fornia attempting to do something for the 
architectural profession — namely to furnish it 
with draftsmen who will later become archi- 
tects. What is the profession doing for these 
schools? Has it through its local organiza- 
tions ever even attempted to do anything for 
them? Yet how willing will be the very archi- 
tects who compose these organizations to be 
exacting in their demands and free in their 
criticisms of the universities! 

Whose business is it anyway to guide the 
destinies of the professional school — school 
teachers or professional men? And if it is 
the business of professional men, where will 
such men come from if the local colony does 
not produce them? Think of a medical school 
without doctors, a dental school without den- 
tists! Can there be a real school of architec- 
ture without architects? Has there ever been 
a professional school in the history of the 
world that has succeeded without the active 
interest and co-operation of professional men? 

There can be no greater indictment of the 
local profession than that at even this date, 
no help has been given the local schools. 
Fortunately it is not too late to begin. Per- 
haps the profession can make amends for 
past indifferences. Both local university de- 
partments would welcome advisory boards for 
their Beaux-Arts Ateliers, both should have 
courses in special lectures on architectural 
subjects offered by various local architects, 
through the architectural organizations, and 
what is most needed— both should have, both 
must have — design libraries. 

When the profession has educated itself, 
and not before, will it find it unnecessary to 
"educate" the public to an appreciation of 
art. Few men are insensible to beauty. Few 
men there are who do not strive for its pos- 
session. Real architecture requires no placard- 
ing. It will itself speak. More of it is what 
the public deserves. And what the profession 
needs is more men capable of producing it — 
good draftsmen, good designers, good critics, 
and good architects. 



DIRECTORS 

William Lee Woollett 
Donald Wilkinson 
Walter S. Davis 

Office of the Club, 81S Santee Street 

RESEARCH COMMITTEE 

THE Architectural Club has established a 
Research Committee and has named Mr. 
John Austin chairman of the committee, with 
Messrs. Henry Cheney and A. C. Zimmer- 
man committee members. Mr. W. C. Hay of 
the Blue Diamond Materials Company has 
offered to donate quite a sum of money to this 
committee to enable it to carry on its work. 
It is believed that the committee will be able 
to do a great deal of its research work through 
the medium of the California School of Tech- 
nology. Mr. Paul Penland, secretary of the 
Architectural Club and Research Engineer 
for Mr. Hays' company, is now traveling in 
Europe, charged with the task of making an 
exhaustive research of building materials and 
architectural construction throughout the 
continent. He is available to club members, 
we are informed, to gather any particular 
information they may require, and has offered 
to order such architectural books as any of 
us may desire to purchase from, European 
libraries and book stores. 

EMPLOYMENT REGISTRY 

The system of sending out letters of ap- 
plication for positions through the medium 
of employment registry service of the Club 
has not proven successful, according to Mr. 
Henry Davis, chairman of the committee, pri- 
marily because the architects are too busy 
to co-operate in the details of the system to 
insure its success. 

From now on applicants for positions will 
be given a list of architects inquiring for as- 
sistance and allowed to make the rounds for 
themselves. The club will continue to ad- 
vertise in local newspapers and in Archi- 
tectural Journals for draftsmen. 

Listed below, as they have been received 
by us, are various local offices requiring as- 
sistance. We regret that we have no list of 
draftsmen available to fill these positions: 

AUSTIN CO., 702 Pacific Ebctric Bldg., architectural 
draftsman. 

BROWN. S. H., 528 Union League Bide., architectural 
draft-man. 

CHENEY. CLYDE, 719 Fay Bldg., architectural man. 

CROSS, HAROLD, 1132 Merchants National Bank Bldg., 
competent man who can tak? charge of uome work. 

DONELLAN. JAMES .1., 214 Lbsner Bldg., designer 
and architectural draftsman. 

EISEN, PERCY, 326 Pacific Finance Bldg., good archi- 
tectural man. 

TRANINFELDER. .1. J., 1116 Story Bide., designer 
and superintendent who can look after structural 
work, both inside and out. 

REA & GAKSTANG, 903 Trust & Savings Bldg.. archi- 
tectural man. 

STANTON. REED & HIBHARD, 622 Metropolitan Bldg.. 
architectural man. 

JEFFERY & SCHAEFFER, 1101 Kerchoff Bldg., archi- 
tectural man. 

KEIM. T. B„ 709 Haas Bldg., architectural man (soonl. 

KUNST., JOHN, 820 Higgins Bldg. I Does not want 
to pay a large salary ; wants a man to do vari- 
ous kinds of work in office.) 

LARRALDE, J. A., 1400 Stock Exchange Bldg., archi- 
tectural and structural engineering men. 

MARTIN, A. C. 430 Higgins Bldg., architect and 
engineer : also wants a very high grade man. 

MORGAN. WALLS & MORGAN, 1124 Van Nuys Bldg.. 
good architectural men. 

GABLE & WYANT. 634 S. Western Ave., all around 
architectural draftsman ; permanent position. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



19 



THE SMALL HOUSE SERVICE MONTHLY PLAN NO. 3 



f 





NORTH • ELEVATION 



WEST ■ ELEVATION 



•PERSPECTIVE 



[ FOR A ONE IvjoRY HOU5rTTQg0 5T $ 5Q Od 






J-LOOR • PLAN 



FOUNDATION ■ piAN ' 



PLOT PL/MV- 



NEWS OF THE ATELIERS 
Architectural Club of Los Angeles 
All Atelier members are working together 
in an endeavor to interest the architects in 
Los Angeles in adding to their library. Prac- 
tically every office in town is benefited mate- 
rially by the instruction given in the Archi- 
tectural Club Atelier and the members feel 
that the profession at large will be glad to 
co-operate in this book drive. Mr. Haskell, 
chairman of the Library Committee, is work- 
ing along similar lines himself, as are his 
fellow members of the committee. From nu- 
merous promises already made to Atelier 
members, it would seem that a substantial 
increase in the club library will be accom- 
plished within the next month. 

Southern Branch University of California : 

All the architectural organizations in Los 
Angeles and all institutions teaching archi- 
tecture were represented at the banquet of 
the Architectural Society of the Southern 
Branch University of California, held at the 
University Club, April 19. A lecture on "Ital- 
ian Gardens" by Myron Hunt was a feature 
of the program. Sumner Hunt, president of 
Southern California Chapter, American Insti- 
tute of Architects, spoke at length upon the 
interest of the institute in architectural edu- 
cation. Jess Stanton spoke on similar lines 
in the interest of the Allied Architects Asso- 
ciation of Los Angeles. Lloyd Rally, vice- 
president of the Architectural Club of Los 
Angeles, told of the value of the Atelier of 
the architectural club to architectural stu- 
dents, and impressed upon all the need for 
closer co-operation between the professional 
men and the institutions teaching architecture, 
and suggested that this banquet, which was 
the first at which representatives of the pro- 
fession and those teaching architecture had 
even been gotten together, be made an annual 
affair. Fitch Haskell, who served on a jury 



with Mr. Stanton and Kenneth Carpenter, who 
judged the Beaux Arts problems of the South- 
ern Branch Atelier, reviewed the findings of 
the jury and named the students who were 
given awards. The problems submitted by 
Rodney McClelland and Alden Johnson were 
placed first and second, respectively, in the 
competition. Julian Garnsey, mural painter, 
and Henry Cheney, city planner, spoke of 
the importance of architects becoming inter- 
ested in mural painting and city planning 
respectvely. Claude Faithful, head of the 
architectural department at the Polytechnic 
High School, spoke about the place of high 
schools in architectural education. The archi- 
tectural department and faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Southern California were the guests 
of the Southern Branch Society at the ban- 
quet. Professor Weatherhead of the Univer- 
sity of Southern Californa spoke of the need 
for two institutions to teach architecture in 
the South, citing the value of the competition 
gained therefrom, and the consequent reaction 
on both departments. 

Mr. Julian Garnsey will give the second of 
his series of lectures on mural painting next 
week, and the special lecture of the following 
weeks will be given by Mr. Gordon Whitnall 
of the Los Angeles City Planning Commission. 

An exhibition of the European water color 
renderings of Mr. Donald Parkinson is beina: 
held this week and will be followed next week 
by an exhibition of the architectural ren- 
derings and water color studies made by Mr. 
Kenneth Carpenter while a student at the 
American Academy in Rome. 

Messrs. Paul Davis and Donald Marquis 
have completed their drawings for the Rome 
Prize Preliminary Competition. The South- 
ern Branch Department is looking forward to 
having both men at the university for five 
weeks during the finals. 

The following Beaux Arts awards are an- 
nounced: 



Class "B" — IV Projet 
Second Mention — F. C. Hageman, R. Stadel- 
man, L. Russell, A. Hansen, F. Chambers, 
R. McClelland, A. Johnson, F. Pilmer, F. 
Goertz, T. Pemberton, F. Gloege and R. Alli- 
son. 

H. C. — J. Miller and A. Connors. 
University of Southern California : 

An exhibition of etchings given through 
the courtesy of Mr. E. Miller, and including 
some of Frank Brangwyn's, will be exhibited 
under the auspices of the architectural de- 
partment. The week following the water 
colors of Messrs. Donald Parkinson and Ken- 
neth Carpenter will be exhibited. 

BEAUX ARTS 
Class "B" — IV Projet 
Second Mention — N. Law, G. Anderson, S. 
Cundiff. 

Analytique 
Second Mention — T. Bletsch, J. Savage, 
B. Webb, S. Pidgon, A. Taranin, B. More- 
head, B. Norris and R. Duell. 

COMPETITIONS 
Indianapolis News Architectural Competition: 

The Indianapolis News is holding a com- 
petition for a house containing from eighteen 
thousand to twenty-five thousand cubic feet, 
with four prizes aggregating $500.00, and a 
jury of awards consisting of institute mem- 
bers has been chosen. 
Alabama Marble Company Competition: 

The Alabama Marble Company is holding 
a competition for a small bank building, the 
winner of which will receive an $1800.00 
traveling scholarship, which is to cover a 
ten months' period of European travel. 

Club members desiring further information 
about these, may obtain same by calling the 
office of the president. 



20 CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

THE PASADENA HOSPITAL, A REFUGE AND FRIEND IN NEED 




THE use of the modern hospital in any 
community parallels, in the minds of in- 
telligent, educated people, the use of their post- 
office or their schools. Since the community 
has become the unit in many matters which 
were once centered in the home, the care of 
the disabled has become a community affair; 
the wealth of individuals and of corporations 
has been concentrated on research, and inten- 
sive training in schools for nurses; millions 
have been dedicated through the Rockefeller 
Foundation, Red Cross and other funds, and 
through the self-sacrifice of individual physi- 
cians, that the world might have knowledge 
of the human body, its proper care and the 
effect upon it of our present civilization in all 
its complications and strains. 

Modern equipment, perfected by years of 
study on the part of professional men and 
women is here kept up to date that the com- 
munity may have advantage of every new in- 
vention and comfort-giving appliance both in 
the hospital's private rooms and in the en- 
dowed dispensary maintained for those who 
cannot afford to pay the full fee. Philan- 
thropic men and women endow these institu- 
tions, skilled physicians and surgeons give 
freely a service which has cost them years of 
youth and study and thousands of dollars to 
obtain. Out from these centers of knowledge 
so dearly bought with time and strength and 
money there flows a constant stream of in- 
formation on the care of the body, the rules 
of healthy living and the first aid in emer- 
gency. To this center of help are carried the 
maimed, the halt and blind, the hurt child, the 
injured workman, the wounded of countless 
automobile accidents and others who need 
care. 

In that twilight zone which always sur- 
rounds the highly trained in any profession 
there exists today a vast area full of partially 
informed people who have inherited by tradi- 
tion and grasp by superficial study certain 
details of health-forming habits, certain facts 
which have been made common property for 
all. Some of these people are simply well 
educated laymen who have schooled themselves 
in the knowledge of hygiene and exercise, as 
Roosevelt did, that they might be efficient and 
well. Others have obtained enough knowl- 
edge and training in one line to make them 
useful workers in the great army of hospital 
attendants, nurses, students in some special 
investigation or research institute. Skilled in 
one thing only, they are nevertheless vital, 



necessary factors in the great campaign that 
in making everybody better every day. But 
more important it is for the general public 
to realize that in this growing and extensive 
region that lies between the trained profes- 
sional and the ailing individual needing him, 
there are hundreds of half-informed wage 
earners who have taken this free-for-all 
knowledge of which I have spoken and have 
formed of it a tool, a system, an excuse with 
which to earn a living for themselves. For 
many years our pseudo colleges and so-called 
universities turned out scores of half-baked 
"doctors" until the very title has become a 
reproach where it should be the most honor- 
able title in the world today. In our Ameri- 
can way of being tolerant and fair to "the 
under dog" we have been grossly unjust to 
the experts we have paid millions to produce. 

Let us learn another lesson from the war, 
whose fringes of anguish still trail across our 
way as we hear month by month of new vic- 
times among the flower of our youth unable to 
bear the awful strain! In the transport 
splints of the American army is exemplified 
an easily understood incident of the dissemi- 
nation of expert information such as I have 
stated is universal among professional men. 

Statistics show that somewhat more than 
50 per cent of gunshot wounds involve the 



bones and joints. The efficient splinting of 
these injuries at the earliest possible moment 
is universally acknowledged by all surgeons 
to be of the greatest importance. 

The division of orthopedic [corrective] sur- 
gery, created by General Gorgas soon after 
the beginning of the war, was given charge 
of the splinting at the front. Orthopedic sur- 
geons were assigned to the combat divisions 
under the division surgeons. Instruction and 
splint drills were given enlisted men. 

The war did much, therefore, to develop 
orthopedic surgery and surgeons. Remark- 
able plaster casts were invented with windows 
bridged across by reinforcements allowing 
treatment of an open wound and at the same 
time a brace for broken bones. All the fund 
of knowledge stored up by these expert sur- 
geons is still at the service of our crippled 
children and all the skill of orthopedic sur- 
gery is now turned to the art of curing the 
deformed or the injured in such a way as to 
most nearly give back his fullest degree of 
function. Here at the Pasadena Hospital we 
have full benefit of all this skill in our physi- 
cians, surgeons, nurses and meehano-thera- 
putists. But as yet it has not the equip- 
ment necessary to handle in the most up-to- 
the-minute way the ordinary cases of broken 
bones and injuries by automobile accidents. 



PASADENA'S MUNICI- 
PAL PLUNGE 
By L. R. Briyhnm 

CONSTRUCTION is well 
under way on the addi- 
tional outdoor municipal 
plunge at Pasadena, Califor- 
nia, for which $10,000 was 
included in a bond issue ap- 
proved last year by the peo- 
ple of Pasadena. This plunge 
was found necessary to re- 
lieve the increasing conges- 
tion in the old plunge which 
has become more and more 
popular every year. 

The new plunge is 50 ft. 
wide by 150 ft. long and 
graduates in depth from 4 ft. 
to 12 ft. and is to be equipned 
with regulation diving ap- 
paratus, the plans calling for 
regulation 3 ft. and 10 ft. 
spring boards and a 24 ft. 
diving platform. The old 
plunge has been recently re- 
vamped for use particularly 
by the children and non- 
swimming adults. Ample 
provision has been made for 
the proper circulation and 
purification of the water. 

The popularity of the old 
plunge is well indicated by 
the fact that it drew an at- 
tendance during the year 
1921-22 of 84,146 people. 'The 
attraction of the new plunge 
to expert swimmers points 
towards a record attendance 
at "ye old swimming hole" 
this season. 



SPSS PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY 3£S3aE? 




CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



21 



CALIFORNIA 
HOMES AND 



si 

NEXT to the blue sky and the sunshine of 
California come the hills in importance. 
Between them lie canons and soft, rolling val- 
leys, our only woodlands; on their sloping 
sides and summits the native Californian loves 
to sit among the dry, wild grasses and rest 
while watching white clouds roll along the dis- 
tant mountains or the gleam of old ocean be- 
tween the channel islands and the teeming 
towns along the shore. 




California hills, so long ignored or scoffed 
at by the ignorant plainsman, are now in 




GARDENING 
MANUAL 



A HILLSIDE HOME ON CATALINA ISLAND. ARCHITECTS, WEBBER. STAUNTON AND SPAULDING. 



danger from that very ignorance. Like the 
stupid woodsman from some region where 
trees abound, his first impulse is to cut them 
down, or hack them into town lots resembling 
flat land. The subdivide! - is storming the 
heights; and unless architects and others who 
know how shall quickly teach our builders to 
cuddle a house into the side of a hill as has 
been done in the one here illustrated, our hills 
will all be ruined, marred as a residence sec- 
tion and ugly to look at. "A city set on a 
hill cannot be hid." 

BIRD-BANDING 

By Theresa Hornet Patterson 

"Bird banding in New England is as con- 
tagious as the Flu," is the way Mr. S. Prentiss 
Baldwin speaks of this new angle .n bird study. 
Every once in a while there seems to be some- 
thing "new under the sun" but a hundred years 
ago Audubon was twisting a silver wire about 
a bird's ankle for identification. Europe has 
been interested for twenty years and the 
American Bird Banding Associat on organized 
in 1909. Two years ago a Mr. Fletcher asked 
"what is this bird banding?" and at that the 
work took on a new impetus. The Bureau of 
Biological Survey took over the work of fur- 
nishing bands and keeping the records from 
the Linnean Society which had been the inter- 
vening link. Each band sent out bears a num- 
ber and B. S. (Biological Survey). 

No second nap, a hasty breakfast, morning 
paper unopened, hat and gloves adjusted in a 
dash for the street car, all this on April 25 for 
the Audubons to catch the early bird, not eat- 
ing worms but bread crumbs in the traps of J. 
Eugene Law. I hesitate to call them "traps" 



ECONOMIC VALUE OF THE INVESTIGATION OF 
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 

By Franklin Thomas 
Head of the Department of Civil Engineering, C. I. T. 

DESIGNING of structures was formerly an art only, for neither 
the distribution of stress nor the properties of resistance of 
materials was known; proportion was by judgment guided by experi- 
ence or precedent. The building of structures of unusual size was 
often preceded by numerous failures. Old large span masonry 
arches in Europe are objects of wonder, but a study of their 
history often reveals the fact that they are the results of repeated 
attempts which might be regarded as a series of full size experiments. 

The science of design of structures requires a knowledge of 
methods for determining the character and intensity of stress as 
well as the properties of materials to resist these stresses. If this 
information were complete and applied to all phases of construction, 
there would be little necessity for precedent; but often a saving of 
time required to make rigid computations justifies the use of a gen- 
erous amount of material, thus combining with science the art of 
proportioning. 

High cost of materials and low cost of labor in Europe justifies 
more intensive analysis of stresses. With diminishing resources in 
the United States, the tendency toward refinement in design and the 
use of materials is marked. 

Timber, with its greater strengih in proportion to weight, is used 
with greater economy than formerly. 

Cast iron and wrought iron for resisting compression and ten- 
sion stresses respectively, have, in general, been replaced by steel. 
Nickel or other alloy steels are used in long span bridges and other 
instances where special properties are required. The automobile has 
been an important factor in forcing progress in the field of metal- 
lurgy. Experimental work with metals showed in a short time the 
advantageous effects of some constituents and the injurious effects 
oi others. It is now possible to specify and forecast the strength 
from the chemical composition. 

The displacement, to a large extent, of stone and brick masonry 
by concrete — a material manufactured very simply on the site — has 
produced a condition requiring extrem care and close supervision if 
good results are to be secured. The simplicity of manufacture has 
led to unscientific methods of proportioning the ingredients. The 
art of making concrete, while still young, is being replaced by science. 
Elaborate series of tests have proven conclusively the weakening 
effect of too much water, and have developed more precise methods 
of proportioning the solid ingredients. In this field the laboratory 
developments are much in advance of common practice. 

Exemplifying the scope of laboratory investigations concerning 
construction materials, reference may be made to the testing mate- 
rials laboratory of California Institute of Technology. The labora- 
tory has two divisions, the first a cement and concrete laboratory, 
and the second a laboratory for the general testing of the materials 
of construction. The equipment includes all necessary apparatus 
for standard tests in tension, compression, bending, torsion, fatigue, 




friction, and hardness. The cement and concrete laboratory is pro- 
vided with tables for weighing and mixing, and with a complete 
equipment of sieves, needles, molds, etc., for the determination of the 
various properties of cement, sand and concrete, as recommended by 
the Joint Committee of the American Society of Civil Engineers and 
the American Society for Testing Materials. 



22 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



which carries the picture of torture and death. 
They are l.ttle wire houses with doors that 
close after the visitors enter, made after Mr. 
Law's own plan and specially recommended by 
the government. 

Mr. J. Eugene Law is editor of the Condor 
and chairman of the Banding Chapter of the 
Cooper Ornithological Club, and as organizer 
of the work on this coast is seeking those who 
have the interest of birds at heart and are 
fitted to do conscientious work. The Govern- 
ment issues the permits of which there can be 
no transfer. 

Mr. Law has a bird sanctuary of several 
acres in Altadena on the dizzy edge of a can- 
yon where grease-wood, ferns, sage, snakes 
and poison ivy run so close to the house that 
they can almost pull the latchstring (which is 
long). While the four snakes found there are 
not poisonous neither are they sufficiently orna- 
mental or useful to offset their taste for birds. 
The beautiful green-tinted plaster house is so 
much a part of its setting that the Canyon 
Wren sat on the porch rail and spread his tail 
in sheer delight, as though his song were not 
enough! 

We had just been let in by the rear gate 
when the excitement began. "Got a bird in 
the trap!" Everyone went a step into the 
thicket to see a Golden Crowned Sparrow 
caught in the interest of science. With quiet- 
ness and gentleness Mr. Law took him out, his 
little heart beating even faster at sight of so 
many strangers. On his left leg was a band 
(so placed on immature birds). The number 
of the band was taken and one of the guests 
took his picture. After the hand was opened 
his heart was normal and whether he was 
"freezing" or too comfortable to move we could 
not tell, but he did not fly for some moments. 
Referring to the records this was found to be 
a bird banded by Mr. Law last fall as it came 
down from Alaska or British Columbia, and 
which is now returning to the land of its birth. 
From under the brown of winter the pin 
feathers had released their gold for his mating 
crown. This bird's number, the dates of his 
occurrance and return are kept by the Bio- 
logical Survey. At one banding station in 
Georgia out of fifty-seven caught one morning 
fifteen bore bands of the previous year; and 
having been banded these are called "Returns." 

The traps are left but a few minutes, mak- 
ing a bird's captivity brief. No. 2 was a San 
Diego Towhee. His flashing red eye showed 
less fright than anger, and to leave no doubt 
in our minds he bit and squealed. The tiny 
band by aid of pinchers was made to slip easily 
up and down on the leg. The photographer 
was so excited she had to call for help. Just 
then we saw a pair of Gray Gnat Catchers 
carrying cotton to their nest. More blue than 
gray, touched up with white, moulding with 



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their bodies the soft lining of that mossy nest. 
Well just that was enough beauty and joy for 
one day! Watching our step for Indian paint 
brush and baby oak trees we tiptoed out to see 
the San Diego Wren but our eyes were caught 
by the Titmouse shouting into an upturned 
pipe. There were no hollow trees and she had 
to be near these "Law"-abiding folks so why 
not use a pipe to nest in? Between lumbermen 
and tree dentists they and their kind may as 
well adapt themselves to modern inventions. 

No. 3 was a Wren Tit, his number showing 
that he was a "recurrence" and proved that he 
either had a poor memory or wasn't afraid 
of traps. A moment after being released he 
burst into song. Last year after the baby 
"Tits" had been banded the parents lined them 
up to admire their anklets. This bird eats 
seeds, worms and berries. A male Thrasher 
returned and would come when Mrs. Law called 
"B.ll" and would pick the crumbs as they 
dropped from her hand. As we went into the 
house to see the records Mrs. Law was snipping 
off cotton and dabbing it into a shrub. Little 
Gray Nats don't object to having things handed 
to them. One of them flew off with so much 
that he couldn't see his way to the nest. 
When we came out half an hour later the cot- 
ton was nearly gone. The Lazuli Bunting in 
his turquoise blue just from Mexico looked 
settled for the summer. 

Bird banding will eventually give age of 
birds, routes of migration, whether they return 
to their birthplace to nest, whether they make 
the same feeding stations in passage, rate of 
travel, whether they have the same summer 
and winter homes or whether they are globe- 
trotters, local range, change in individual 
plumage. 

Bird banding has all the sport of hunting 
plus the interest of playing a game. Giving a 
number to a messenger to Alaska and South 
America and awaiting his return is better than 
sitting down to funeral baked meats. 



An Ideal School for Young Women 

Cumnock ^cfjool 

COLLEGE WORK IN THE FOLLOWING 
COURSES: 
Vocal Interpretation of Literature 
Literary Appreciation Story Telling 
Public Speaking Journalism 
Dramatics Short-Story 
Voice and Diction Dancing 
French Psychology 

Art and Art Appreciation 
An accredited High School and Junior School 
under same management 
HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
200 S. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles 

54720— Wilshire 79 



MUSIC FOR CHILDREN 
By H. H. Peck 

There are two distinct departments to art, 
whether it appeals to the ear or to the eye 
or directly to the intellect through speech 
and the written word. Of these two parts — 
the appreciation and the production go hand 
in hand as they develop in any community. 
A wide appreciation of art produces artists 
as individuals, and great artists focus and 
inspire appreciation. 

It is the duty of the public schools, there- 
fore, to lay the foundation for wide apprecia- 
tion. In the modern American school which 
undertakes to educate everybody equally, 
mechanical methods of accomplishing results 
are not only excusable but necessary. And 
while every child must be made to work in- 
tensively in some one line if he is to be made 
the most of as an individual, yet the pleasure 
of appreciation in all the arts may be attained 
by less drudgery. 

In an excellent treatise on this subject, 
Kathryn E. Stone, supervisor of music in the 
Los Angeles schools, says: "For several years 
past, experimentation in the application of the 
phonograph to school use has been proceeding. 
The movement has now progressed to such a 
stage that a phonograph and a library of 
music records may well be regarded as an 
essential part of the equipment of every public 
school building." 

In the Los Angeles city school district, office 
of music department, the following list of 
records for a music memory contest is given 
and typifies the works now being selected for 
the different grades. It will be useful to fol- 
low this method of chosing a library of records 
and special new and up-to-date information 
will be given each month in this column. 

1. Amaryllis (double-faced record, fourth 
grade list), Minuet Paderewski 

2. Serenade, To a Wild Rose (double- 
faced record) Pierne 

3. From the Land of the Sky-Blue 
Water Cadman 

4... Spinning Song (Mendelssohn or Spindler 

5. ..Scarf Dance -. . . Chaminade 

<i. Lo, Here the Gentle Lark 

7. Traumerei (double-faced record), 

Minute Boccherini 



FRENCH and ITALIAN ARTS and CRAFTS 

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Evening Bags. Old Silver, etc. Antiques 
Embroidered Linens Potteries 
630 E. Colorado Street Pasadena, Calif. 

Fair Oaks 6028 



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Elizabeth H. Baker 



THE CALIFORNIA STUDIO 

Designers of Individual Furnish ngs for the 
Home, Modern and Antique Furn'ture, 
Lamps, Shades, Fabrics, Gifts 
Consulting Decorators 
Tel. Fair Oaks 15 70 
635 East Colorado Street, Pasadena, Calif. 



PASADENA HARDWARE COMPANY 

has been dispensing Hardware to the particular people of Pasadena for 
the past 36 years. Cheap Hardware is an abomination We only handle 
the best. We solicit your patronage. 

66 to 76 West Colorado St. 
Service and Quality is our slogan. 




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55 South Marengo Avenue 

PASADENA, CALIF. 

Both Phones 110 




The New Victrola Console 

$100.00 
Others Now in Preparation 

A Series of Period Cases by the 
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C A LI F O RN I A S O U T H LA N D 23 



A HOUSE WITH FOREIGN 
INFLUENCE 

<By MARAGARET CRAIG 

THERE is a marked feeling of satisfaction 
that comes to a beholder when he ob- 
serves the interior decoration of a house 
blending closely with its architectural features. 

In the residence of Mrs. V. C. Emden, 623 
Arden Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, this 
co-relation of the two arts has been most ably 
executed, and as a consequence the resulting 
unity that prevails renders a sustained feeling 
of comfort and consistency. Indubitably, the 
cause of the pervading influence of these en- 
during qualities is the fact that Mrs. Emden 
used for her inspiration the noblest type of 
French chateau architecture and the originals 
or sincere copies of the most acceptable types 
of furnishings. 

The house is built of rich colored red brick, 
the only architectural embellishments consist- 
ing of the cream stone scrolled portal and 
several groups of extremely high and narrow 
windows. It is the presence of these details, 
however, that prepares one for the character 
of the interior which is marked by noticeable 
dignity and elegance. 

The hallway suggests the treatment of the 
entire house, which is rather that of a foreign 
mansion, and never deviates from its purpose 
of being a comfortable home that satisfies 
the needs of a modern family. Its lofty walls 
are panelled with Caen stone, that form a fine 
background for the stairway with its dull 
gold and polychromed balustrade. 

Mr. John Luccareni, with noteworthy skill, 
assisted Mrs. Emden in the design and selec- 
tion of the furnishings of the house and most 
ably superintended the execution of all of the 
architectural adornments. The living room 
that opens off from the hall is very spacious — 
twenty feet by thirty-five in actual dimensions. 
The features that unify this immense room, 
twenty feet in height, are the grooved mahog- 
any pilasters built in the wall, bordering the 
doors and window groups; the foot wide frieze 
that occurs at the base of the vaulted ceiling; 
and the balcony at the south end of the room. 
The fireplace is the dominating feature of this 
room. The painting above it is a copy of 
"Narcissus." Its tones of soft red, old blues 
and golds form the keynote of the furnishings. 
The decoration work upon the substantial 
Renaissance fireplace below was modified to 
echo the curves of the frame and lines of the 
painting. 




The fine window decoration used through- 
out the house deserves especial mention. Here, 
ample curtains of heavy silk velour are tied 
back at the windows with specially made large 
loops and tassels. These draperies are made 
so that they lie on the floor with heavy two- 
toned bullion fringe. Lambrequins, forming 
arches at the top of the windows, are made of 
carved wood and are in the dull gold and poly- 
chromed. The floor covering is a wonderfully 
large Aubison rug, its colors repeating those 
in the painting and harmonizing well with 
the rich brocades that cover many of the 
pieces of hand-carved furniture. 

The lighting of this large room is accom- 
plished by the use of indirect lights placed in 
bowls at the top of the pilasters and by the 



sconces on the side walls, all of hand-wrought 
iron. This diffusing lighting blends the colors 
of the grey-green hand-stippled walls, the 
faun colored draperies, and the foreign reds 
and greens used in the furniture. 

The second floor is decorated to be consistent 
with the first floor. Three of the bedrooms, it 
is interesting to note, are furnished so that 
they also form sitting rooms. This arrange- 
ment is very common in France and one that 
might well be copied extensively. 

In the entire treatment of the house there is 
a delightful co-relation of details and mass 
arrangement that comes from a preconceived 
idea of the fitness of things, and Mr. Lucca- 
reni has been fortunate in being able to use 
his skill in aiding the successful undertaking 
of building up a unique scheme of decoration. 



FLINTR1DGE is today the 
scene of the greatest build- 
ing activity in its history. 

There is only one Flintridge — 
there is only just so much Flint- 
ridge. 

Those incomparable Flintridge 
homesites, overlooking moun- 
tains, fairway, parkland, lake and 
valley, will not be long available 
at present prices. 

Flintridge Sales Company 

727 Title Ins. Bldg., Los Angeles. 
Tel: 10601, Main 685 
Tract Office: Fair Oaks 212 



Draperies 




Furniture 




JOHN F. LUCCARENI 






INTERIOR DECORATOR 






3876 West Sixth St. 




Phone 560-658 




Los Angeles 



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1101 Garland Bldg., LOS ANGELES, CAL. 




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PHONES ] 822803 



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business at $10.00 
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CAMPBELL OFFICE SERVICE 




823-824 LOEWS STATE BUILDING 

BROADWAY AT SEVENTH LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



24 CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

THE FOURTH IN A SERIES OF LESSONS ON PROCESSES IN HANDICRAFT 

SHOP TALK By CARL VAN DUGTEREN 




I tpOME IN! Good morning, Mac." 

"Good morning, Van; what are you 
doing?" 

"Chasing, Mac, chasing." 

"Chasing fantoms and rainbows?" 

"No, chasing a bridge." 

"Ha! ha! that sounds funny." 

"It isn't — but come over here and I will tell 
you all about it. I am working a lid for a 
cedar lined, silver cigarette box, having a pic- 
ture of our Colorado Street bridge for decora- 
tion. You see, Mac, this round bottomed steel 
kettle is called a pitch block. From the bottom 
up it is partly filled with lead, and on top of 
that is a melted mixture of pitch, plaster of 
paris and a little fat. It is melted in an iron 
kettle which we call a pitch-pot. The ring you 
see (shaped like a life preserver) is made of 
strong, heavy canvass and is filled with fine 
sand. This allows the rounded bottom of the 
pitch-block to be put at any angle while work- 
ing; the heavy weight keeps it in position, and 
the sand pad conforms to the shape of the 
pitch-block. So you see it is rigid in any 
position. An iron band shaped like a ring 
will do the same thing. 

"I will only tell you about the tools used 
on this job, for it would take too long too 
describe all tools used in chasing. 

"Next we have our hammers and punches, 
a boxwood mallet — one face rather flat the 
other one more rounding; a few wooden 
punches made from broom handles, maple 
table legs, auto wheel spokes — in fact any 
wood that is medium hard and easily worked. 
Next a post or block of wood with concave 
round holes of different sizes and depths. The 
wooden punches and the block with the 
holes I use to round up and shape any flat 
surface metal. This piece of silver was flat, 
now it is high in the center and slopes gradu- 
ally towards the edges. The curvature gives 
it a more artistic look and makes it stronger. 
There is another reason, which you will notice 
later. The chasing hammers are made of 
steel — a light weight and a heavier one, small, 
half round on one end and a large flat face 
on the opposite side. You will notice that 
the end of the handle fits the hand and that 
it is thinner near the hammer head. This 
gives it spring and a rebound. 

"Now we have the punches, all made from 
steel, all sizes and shapes to meet require- 
ments. It is the end of the punch which 
touches the metal that does the work. They 
should not cut through the metal, only dent 
when struck a blow; and the shape or design 
imprinted in the metal as deep as wanted with 
one or more hammer blows. 

"Engraving is a different process. The 
metal is cut away with graver's steel chisels 
fastened in small handles. These are pushed 
with the palm of the hand and like a plow- 
cut furrows in the metal. 

"Chasing is simply the denting of the metal, 
which is done on both sides; the most promi- 
nent parts which have to stand out are 
punched up from the back. 

"The design before us is 'The Bridge.' First, 
I cut the silver plate (guage 22) a little larger 
than the finished job should be, about Vi-inch 
all around, and anneal it. This means that 
it is heated red hot to make it soft and 
pliable. 

"Next, I trace the design on the plal.e with 
a sharp pointed steel tracer — it is there and 
cannot rub out. Then we use the wooden 
block, mallet, and wooden punches, and shape 
the silver plate in form, working plate face 
down and punching on the back till we have 
a nicely curved surface to work on. 

"The surface pitch on the block is heated 
with a blow-torch and modeled to shape to 
receive the plate, which has also been heated 
and received a little pitch on the side which 
shall adhere to the block. We place it on the 
block, pressing firmly down, taking care that 
the pitch touches the whole under surface of 
the plate. Apply the torch if more heat is 
needed, working till the plate is firmly secured. 
Cooling the pitch is our next move. This can 
be quickly done by immersing in cold water. 

"Having placed the block on the pad we are 
ready for chasing. A chisel-shaped punch 
with a blunt edge is first used to trace the 
sky-line — a continuous line of even depth made 
by light hammer blows on the punch follow- 



ing the line already scratched in. Next a 
flat-faced, oval punch is used on the sky part 
by gently tapping and working the metal on 
an even plane with our sky. The result will 
be a raised mountain-top line and a flat sky. 
This is the most particular and difficult opera- 
tion of the whole job. 

"Next we go for the mountains: chasing in 
the dividing lines, canyons, ridges and other 
details, taking care to preserve perspective in 
touch and softness of tone. 

"The curvature of our plate allows ample 
depth to recede the mountains and keep our 
foliage line raised, which brings it forward, 
and so on through the whole proceeding, keep- 
ing the most prominent parts raised. If we 
should wish to raise any part of the plate, we 
simply remove the plate from the block, clean 
with coal oil and pummice, and punch from the 
back with punch and hammer on that spot we 
wish to raise. This done, we fasten plate 
again on the block, cool it, and go on with 
the work. A little printer's ink on a rag 
rubbed over the plate helps you to see how 
you are getting on. 

"There is no limit to the labor and time one 
may devote on this particular job. Days in- 
stead of hours could be spent on it. But 
our idea is to get just a fair amount of 
detail and expression. 

"The plate being finished, the edges are 
trimmed and it is ready to receive the lid 
edges and hinges, making a cover for our 
cedar-lined cigarette box or silk-lined silver 
jewel case. 



"Any scene may be reproduced in silver in 
this manner. 

"Here is a cigar; smoke up, Mac!" 

"Thanks, Van, I will; but, say, do you use 
all those punches I see, on this job? There 
must be over a hundred I guess." 

"No, Mac, I do not. Now look at the 
end of this punch, see how smooth and round 
it is; and look at this one, see how rough it is; 
and notice this one, full of little holes close 
together. Now, each punch makes its own 
mark, just as our shoe heel leaves a mark 
in the wet sand. So I use only those punches 
which will make the mark or impression 
wanted. Altogether I used about twelve 
punches on this job. 

"Do you know, Mac, that chasing is as old 
as the nations are? In early Egypt and in 
China, or, in fact, any place where metal was 
known, the art of chasing was practiced in 
some manner or other. Our antique Dutch, 
English, Italian and Asiatic metal chasing is 
remarkable! Like painting and sculpture it 
has no limit. And even today wonderful work 
is being done here in America and abroad. If 
you are interested, go to any public library 
and get books on this subject, or to any dealer 
in antique silver; and I assure you that you 
will see some excellent work. 

"Yes, 'The Bridge' — wonderful isn't it? 
Pasadena has, in my judgment, the most 
beautiful bridge in the world — scenery in- 
cluded. 

"And do we appreciate it? Do you? 
"Call again." 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



25 



(Continued from Page 13) 

Located at the entrance to the beautiful Ventura River Valley 
upon a narrow shelf of land between the mountains and the sea, 
broadening fanlike into a wide expanse of fertile acres to the south, 
San Buenaventura has appeal and a future. 

New life has come to the old community. New streets are reach- 
ing out over the valley and into the hills. Fortunately, the city 
fathers of San Buenaventura (they call it Ventura now) have recog- 
nized that along with this promise of prosperity there is the respon- 
sibility of seeing that this new growth is directed toward the best 
interests of the future community. A City Planning Commission has 
been appointed and a planner has been employed to make a thorough 
study of the situation and to lay down adjustable plans for the guid- 
ance of growth. 

The first consideration has been the resources of the city and its 
district. Assuming the present tendencies toward urbanization to 
continue, what size and manner of city must the Ventura of 1950 or 
1975 be anticipated to be. In such connection planning must concern 
itself with "possibility" not "probability." The visualization of the 
future city must carry all the way to the limits imposed by such 
physical factors in controlling the size of cities as the water supply, 
power, shipping facilities, relation to raw material and market, and 
room for economical expansion. A city plan should take all of these 
things into consideration and forsee as clearly as may be possible the 
city that may come. 

Ventura will never be a Los Angeles, but there is no apparent 
reason why it should not reasonably expect an ultimate population 
of forty or fifty thousand people. At least there is that possibility 
and that is the concern of the city plan. Very wisely then, the city 
fathers are taking the precaution to lay the foundation for a city of 
this size. (Continued in June Number) 




Pictorial 

Photographs 

of 

California Landscapes 

Hand Colored in Oil 

The KORIN 

KODAK AND ART SHOP 
522 S. Hill St.. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Opposite Pershing Square 




Sun kissed 

Ocean washed 
Mountain girded 
Island guarded 



SANTA BARBARA 

If you like California you will love Santa Barbara 

JOHN D. BURNHAM, Realtor 

Associated with H. G. CHASE 

012 State Street Phone 69 




J. H. Woodworth 
and Son 

Designing and Building 
Telephone Fair Oaks 281 

200 E. Colorado Street 
Pasadena : Calitornia 




Stationery 

for 

Southland Society 



Not only weddings, but the numerous social 
affairs which they engender, bring promi- 
nently to mind at this season the matter of 
correct stationery. 

And that, in Southland society, means a 
consultation with the Brock & Company 
Department of Stationery. For it is here 
that you feel unqualifiedly sure of absolute 
correctness as to form and wording, and the 
finest of artistry in engraving. 

Of prime importance, of course, are Wed- 
ding Announcements and Invitations and 
the accompanying cards. Also frequently 
calling for consideration are Place Cards for 
luncheons and teas, or special invitations of 
various kinds. Each may raise a question 
as to authoritative usage and every such 
question is correctly determined by our 
wide range of experience. 

Visitors Welcome 

Brock 6 Company 

515 West Seventh Street 

~5etween Olive and Grand ~ 

The House of Perfect Diamonds 



26 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



THE MONEY MARKET LESLlB B B ' HENRY 

'Resident Manager, Blythe, Witter & Co., 'Pasadena 

INCREASES in the price of money as represented by interest 
rates and as reflected in the recessions in prices of fixed term 
securities such as bonds, mortgages, etc., has been a matter of con- 
cern to investors rather than what it should be: the index of oppor- 
tunity. , . . , ., 

Their concern has been based mainly on their inability to reconcile 
the increases in price for money with the tremendous bank reserves 
which seem to indicate a larger pool than immediate requirements 
necessitate, and therefore they have found themselves and the general 
investment situation shrouded with a mystery that has held them 
fearful of placing available funds. 

In order to understand the present situation it would be well to 
recall what was written in this column some four months ago with 
regard to the then prospective increased demand for money which 
would be made by the railroads of the country and awakened in- 
dustry, and which have now come into effect as a demand against 
the investment pool. Furthermore, it should be understood that bank 
reserves in this country at the present time do not represent in their 
entirety credits available for business in this country, as in a con- 
tinuously increasing amount they are made up of gold shipments 
sent here from abroad to take the place of real wealth in the form 
of commodities which foreign debtors had found impossible to de- 
liver here either because of lack of raw materials or their inability 
to surmount the difficulties of the tariff wall. 

On the other hand, some parts of these temporary gold reserves 
have been made the basis for credits in this country, with the result 
that we have had something of inflation of currency running hand in 
hand with natural increases in prices growing out of the prosperity 
which developed after the crash of 1919 and 1920. This combination 
of natural increases of commodity prices and those increases due to 
inflation have very quietly but very effectively worked some marked 
changes in the country's economic structure vitally affecting the 
prices of fixed term securities, since increased commodity prices 
means money of a lower value, it being remembered always that . 
money is but' a counting system in which the real wealth of the coun- 
try, made up of commodities and labor, is represented. By money of 
lower value is meant money of lower purchasing power in terms of 
commodities. 

To what degree money has lost value in the last twelve months a 
review of basic commodity prices will suffice to show; and in some- 
thing like the same proportion has the value of fixed incomes in the 
shape of bond and mortgage interest lost its value, with the result 
that lower prices for fixed term securities with an increased yield 
has been necessary to bridge the increased cost of living. 

In April 1922 choice beef cattle at Chicago was $7.90 per hundred 
pounds as against $8.85 in March of this year. Anthracite coal No. 1 
Buckwheat f. o. b. New York in April 1922 was at $4.75 per gross 
ton as against $6.75 in March of this year. Mixed corn at Chicago in 
April 1922 was 60V4c per bushel as against 73M>c in March of this 
year. Spot cotton of middling grade at New Orleans was 16%C per 
pound in April of last year as against 31 %c in March of this year. 
Clean hides at Chicago were 14c per pound in April of last year as 
against 18M> C in March 1923. Pig iron was at $19.50 per gross ton 
in April of last year as against $31 in March of this year, while open 
hearth steel billets at Pittsburgh were $29.50 and $45.00 on these 
respective dates. Pig lead was 51c per hundred pounds in March 
of last year as against 83 v 2 c in March of this year. First crepe 
plantation rubber at New York was 1514c per pound as against 
33V-.C the present price. Sugar at 3.86c per pound in April of last 
year is to be compared with over 10c per pound at the present time. 
Clean wool at Boston on the same dates compare at $1.12 per pound 
as against $1.43; and zinc at St. Louis has risen from $4.92 M> to 
$7.95 per hundred pounds. 

The notable exceptions to this increase in price have been petro- 
leum, farm products, such as hogs and wheat, and the important in- 
dustrial item, sulphuric acid. Wheat in April 1922 was $1.42 V2 per 
bushel as against a March price this year of $1.19, while hogs, a by- 
product of farming, in April of 1922 were $10.60 per hundred pounds 
as against $8.15 in March of this year. 

These increases in price and corresponding depreciation in the pur- 
chasing power of money, have been proceeding very regularly since 
the second and third quarters of 1921, with the result that we have 
had a fairly stagnant bond market marked by recessions in prices 
that have followed the increases in commodity prices, thereby at- 
tempting through the increased yield on current bond prices to show 
a margin somewhere approaching that increased cost of living which 
has come upon us. 

To date the stock market has not registered a corresponding change 
in price but it would seem certain that before the end of the year 
there will be a change in market conditions on junior securities other 



WE offer for investment of Personal or Trust 
Funds sound Securities returning highest 
rates consistent with safety. 

WILLIAM R. STAATS COMPANY 

Established 1887 
Government, Municipal and Corporation Bonds 



Los Angeles 



311 East Colorado St. 
PASADENA, CALIF. 

San Diego 



San Francisco 



than the purely speculative issues which will reflect the lower value 
of money. As has always been the case in the past, the bond market 
has been the first to register the change in economic conditions and 
correspondingly will be the first to show a change back to money 
values of a higher order. 

In the light of this situation and realizing that the bands have 
already begun to close in on unnecessary expansion of business as 
well as to curtail inflation through the safeguarding of reserves, the 
fixed term investor's position is one of being able to obtain long term 
bonds at the present time on the basis of money of low purchasing 
power with the certainty that when the corrective measures of bank- 
ing interests have again brought commodity prices down to the levels 
of 1921, to say nothing of those of pre-war days, that present day 
purchasers will be the beneficiaries to the extent of from 10% to 30% 
increased purchasing power from their income. 

To wait now for lower security prices is to absolutely close one's 
eyes to the tremendous advances in commodity prices already regis- 
tered, and which have already drawn upon themselves the attention 
that will correct them. The sensible investor of the moment is the 
one who abandons every consideration for speculative possibilities, 
recognizes the extreme cheapness of money of a fixed income charac- 
ter in terms of commodity prices, and buys income today against the 
certainty of higher money values through increased purchasing power 
due to lower commodity prices after the corrective measures have 
had their full force and effect. 



THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 

PRIVATE ESTATE 

'Requires the most thorough study of the 
many conditions involved. BE SURE 
you secure competent service. 



CI 



LANDSCAPE .'. ENGINEER .'. CONTRACTOR 
PASADENA 



Harmonizing Profit 
With Safety 



Large profits and strong security do not travel together. 
It is usually true that to make big gains one must take 
big risks; and, conversely, to insure safety of principal 
one must be content with a moderate return on the in- 
vestment. 

However, it is frequently possible for one who keeps in 
close touch with financial matters to increase his income 
materially without in any way jeopardizing his principal. 

To assist investors in harmonizing profit with safety, and 
obtaining the most attractive returns consistent with 
strong security, is one of the important functions of our 
organization. 

Send for new booklet "Facts Important to Investors" 




Government, Municipal and Corporation Bonds 

311 Van Nuvs Bldg., Los Angeles — Telephone Pico 787 

Santa Barbara San Francisco Pasadena 

1014 State Street 603 Cal. Commercial Union Bldg. 16 So. Raymond Ave. 
Telephone 494 315 Montgomery St. Fair Oaks 26 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



27 



The 

Financial Strength 



of a community is gauged by the 
strength of its banks. 

Pasadena banks on Dec. 29, 1922, held 
total deposits of over $36,346,000, a 
gain in one year of $6,278,000. 
Not only as a beautiful city with ideal 
climatic conditions but also in growth 
of business and financial stability 
Pasadena appeals to the home seeker. 



PASADENA CLEARING 
HOUSE ASSOCIATION 



Pacific-Southwest SAVINGS Bank 

FORMERLY LOS ANGELES TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 



Affiliated in ownership with The First 
National Bank of Los Angeles and the 
First Securities Company 

Serving the Pacific-Southwest through many 
conveniently located branches in Los Angeles and 
in the following California cities: 



Alhambra 


Oxnard 


Atascadero 


Pasadena 




Pasadena Br. 


Carpinteria 


Oak Knoll Br. 


Catalina Island 


Altadena Br. 


El Centro 


Paso Robles 


Fresno, Fidelity Br. 


Redlands 


San Fernando 


Glendale, 


San Luis Obispo 


Glendale Ave. Br. 


San Pedro 


Brand Blvd. Br. 


Marine Branch 


Guadalupe 


San Pedro Br. 


Hanford 


Santa Ana 


Huntington Park 


Santa Barbara 


Commercial of S 


Lemoore 


Barbara Br. 


Lindsay 


Santa Maria 


Lompoc 


Santa Monica 


Long Beach 


Tulare 


Long Beach Br. 


Venice 


Belmont Heights Br. 


Atlantic Avenue Br. 


Visalia 


Los Alamos 


Whittier 


Ocean Park 


Community Bra 


Orcutt 


Wilmington 



DRESSES of even de- 
scription, favored b\ 
fashion for every occa- 
sion of Spring, each model char- 
acterized by distinctive styling 
and superior quality of fabric. 



BROADWAY COR. SIXTH 
LOS ANGELES 



THE BATCHELDER TILES 




We produce Tile for Fireplaces, Fountains, Pave- 
ments, Garden Pots— anything that is appropriately 
made from clay. :: :: :: :: :: 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



A book of photographs, sketches, and plans of represent- 
ative California homes designed by your leading archi- 
tects. Price $1.00. Title— "California Homes." 

Address: Ellen Leech 
544 So. El Molino Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 



Blue Diamond 





Materials CoJnc 



■ 





Electric 
Stucco 




V aricolot Granada Roofing Tile 
•uas selected as northy to bring to 
its lull completion the architectural 
beauty of this charming residence. 



Beautiful 

and Serviceable 



When it is considered how impor- 
tant a part the roof plays in bring- 
ing out the full beauty of the home 
it adorns, it is a significant fact 
that Varicolor Granada Roofing 
Tile has been selected for so many 
beautiful residences in Southern 
California. 

Not only does this beautiful tile 
lend itself to practically every 
form of architecture, but it har- 
monizes with the surroundings 
and serves the utilitarian purposes 
of being durable, economical and 
fireproof. 



% Qdnt/art/ afQu/jtgm (Jay fho'uces 

L.A. Pressed Brick Co. 

ENTIRE SIXTH FLOOR -FROST BLDC 
Second and Broadway 
PHonefl M ■ : : - 6o*l° 



CALIFORNIA 

SOUTHLAND 




JUNE AND SAN JACINTO. CALIFORNIA Jrom a Tainting by Kathwnc Hunley 



No. 42 JUNE, 1923 20 Cents 

CALIFORNIA'S HOME AND GARDEN MAGAZINE 



2 



C A LI F () R N I A S U I T II L.I A D 




HERBERT F. BROWN 

Stationery, Books 
And Picture Framing 



190 E. Colorado St.. Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 66 



PASADENA 

WINDOW SHADE 
SHOP 

Makers of Exclusive 
WINDOW SHADES 
The Best in Materials and 
Workmanship 
12 Holly Street. Fair Oaks 48 



PASADENA LEATHER GOODS CO. 

Suit Cases. Purses. Bags 
Puttees for Men, Women and Children 
Insured and Guaranteed Trunks 
742 E. Colorado St.. 
Fair Oaks 3 54 Pasadena 



LAL'NDERERS DRY CLEANERS 

Royal Laundry Co. 

461 So Raymond Colo. 67 

Pasadena, Calif. 



WHY NOT HAVE THE BEST? 

American Laundry Co. 

Fair Oaks 514 
501 South Raymond Ave. 



Permutit Soft Water Saves 
Clothes 
TROY LAUNDRY 

In Business for Twenty Years 
Pasadena. Cal. Phone C. 146 

Alhambra 243-J 



WICK 

HOWARD MOTOR CO. 

267 W. Colorado St. 

C. S. Brokaw. Res. Mgr. Col. 397 



Phone F. O 44477M 

C. A. VAN DUGTEREN & CO. 
Jewelers - Engravers 
Designers 

303 Fair Oaks Ave. 
Pasadena, Cal. 



Pasadena Corset Shop 

Mrs. H R Ford 
Corsetiere 

CORSETS AND ACCESSORIES 
308 East Colorado Street 
Fair Oaks 3388 Pasadena. Cal 





Florentine Credenza 
of the l()th Century 
From the Studio 

of 



Canmll $ Cbafftn, %*t. 

Paintings :: Period Furniture :: Antiques 
720 WEST SEVENTH STREET 
LOS ANGELES 



3L Wi. fcnlrinson Co. 

SEVENTH AND GRAND 

Whatever is new and interesting in travel, biography, fiction — 
literature in general — is procurable in the Book Section. First Fluor 



J/ie 

CATERERS AND 



CONFECTIONERS 



the 

Of 



prepare the most delectable cool, crisp salads and 
daintiest, yet altogether the most satisfying of sandwiches, 
course, there are the frozen dainties together with the wonder- 
ful French pastries for which the Elite has long been famous. 
Those who prefer hot dinner dishes such as steaks, chops, 
chicken, roast turkey or duck and other meats or fish are served 
daily a la carte from 1 1 :30 a. m. to 1 1 :30 p. m. The Catering 
Department is prepared to serve at your home for all occa- 
sions on short notice any number of people. 

A box of chocolates and B-n Bons or other candies of our own 
make can not fail to give satiifaction 

Elite Delicacy Shop 

629 to 641 SO. FLOWER ST., LOS ANGELES. Phone: Pico 1573 
634 E. COLORADO ST., PASADENA. Phone: Fair Oaks 4053 



Books . . . Toys 

Gulck Stationery Co. 

173 E. COLO. ST.. Pasadena 
Fair Oaks 39 

Picture Framing. Artist's Supplies 



M. L. Bailey 

248 So. Hill St. 

Commercial Photographer 
Pico 6490—15062 



THE 

Eleanor Miller School 

Expression and Music 
PASADENA 

Send for Catalogue 
Phone F. O. 336 251 Oakland Aye. 



DIAMONDS 
WANTED 

Full Cash Value Paid for 
Yours 

Sidney D. Cohn 

302 Bank of Italy Bldg. 
Seventh and Olive Sts. 



Bank Ref. 



Los Angeles, Ca!. 



Public Sal 



ales 



We have purchased 122.000 pair 
U. S. Army Munson last shoes, 
sizes 5 >/= to 12. which was the 
entire surplus stock of one of the 
largest L'. S Coverm.ient shoe 
contractors. 

This shoe is guaranteed one hun- 
dred per cent solid leather, color 
dark tan, bellows tongue, dirt and 
waterproof. The actual value of 
this shoe is $6.00. Owing to this 
tremendous buy we can offer same 
to the public at $2.95. 

Send correct size. Pay postman 
on delivery or send money order. 
If shoes are not as represented 
we will cheerfully refund your 
money promptly upon request. 



National Bay State 
Shoe Company 

296 Broadway, New York. N. Y. 




Beautiful Garden Pieces 
in 

Sculptured Terra Cotta 



Italian Terra Cotta Co. 

W. H. Robison 
1149 MISSION ROAD 
Opposite County Hospital 
Phone Lincoln 1057 Los Angeles 



Clark Vase No 35 




The Radio 
Store... 

"Everything Worth 
While in Radio" 

Radio, Electric and 
Scientific Supplies 

Paul Franklin Johnson 

560-562 E. Colorado St. 
Pasadena, California 
Fair Oaks 3281 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



i 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniimi^ 

! SOUTHLAND ! 
I CALENDAR 



^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIINn: 

Announcements of exhibitions, fetes, 
concerts, club entertainments, etc., for 
the calendar pages are free of charge and 
should be received in the office of Cali- 
fornia Southland, Pasadena, at least 
two weeks previous to date of issue. No 
corrections can be guaranteed if they are 
received later than that date. 

The public is warned that photog- 
raphers have no authority to arrange for 
sittings, free of charge or otherwise, for 
publication in Southland unless appoint- 
ments have been made especially in writ- 
ing by the Editor. 



California Southland is published monthly at 
Pasadena, California. One dollar and twenty 
rents for six issues, two dollars per year. Ad- 
dresses will be changed as many times as de- 
tired if notice is given before the first of the 
month in which the change is made. 

Entered as second class matter, July 28, 1919 
•it the Post Office at Pasadena. California, 
under act of March 3, 1879. 



Clubs 



V 



ALLEY HUNT CLUB: 
The formal season at the Valley Hunt, 
Club closed with May, after which 
time no programs are arranged. The 
tennis court and swimming pool offer 
the outdoor attractions during the 
summer, and individual parties, both 
afternoon and evening, are arranged 
as desired. 

A NNANDALE GOLF CLUB: 



F 



The afternoon bridge, Mah Jongg and 
tea parties have been discontinued for 
the season, but tea wil! be served as 
requested and tables for cards are al- 
ways available. 

The second Friday of each month is 

open day at the club. 

The usual Wednesday and Saturday 

sweepstakes each month through the 

summer. 

LINTRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies' Day has been changed from 
Monday to the first Tuesday in every 
month. On every Ladies' Day the 
women golfers from the clubs in the 
Southern California Association will 
be welcome. 



T OS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB: 
^ Ladies Days, second Monday of each 
month. 

Music during dinner, followed by 
dancing, every Saturday evening 
during the month. 

Luncheon served from 11 :30 to 2 
p. m. on Saturdays. 

Sunday night concerts during month 
twice a month. 

Tea served as requested and tables 
for cards always available. 

VyiLSHIRE COUNTRY CLUB: 
" Ladies' Days, third Monday of each 
month. 

Dancing every second and fourth 
Saturdays during the month. 
A musical is arranged for each Sun- 
day night in the month. 

jyjIDWICK COUNTRY CLUB: 

Ladies' Days, fourth Monday in each 
month. 

Tea and informal bridge every after- 
noon. 

Polo, Wednesday and Saturday of 
each week. 

Dancing every Saturday night in the 
month. 

T OS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB: 

Dinner dances, Tuesday and Friday 
nights of every week. Tuesday night 
informal ; Friday night semi-formal. 
Plunge open to the ladies Tuesday and 
Friday of every week. 

TyrONTECITO COUNTRY CLUB: 

Provides an 18 hole golf course, two 
concrete and two dirt courts for ten- 
nis, bowls and croquet. 
Tea is served and informal bridge 
parties arranged as desired. 
A buffet supper is served every Sun- 
day night. 

pASADENA GOLF CLUB: 

Friday, June 1, buffet supper dance, 
beginning at 8 :30. 

June 5, 12, 19, and 26, the four Tues- 
days of the month, will be ladies' day, 
and special luncheons, card and Mah 
Jongg parties will be given. 
Friday, June 8, evening card party. 
Friday, June 22, Summer Nights' din- 
ner dance. 

The swimming pool is open to mem- 
bers and their guests every day ex- 
cept Saturday and Sunday, which are 
reserved for members, and luncheon 
will be served every Sunday from 12 
until 2 o'clock. 




E. A. 
Maloof 
& Co. 



Designers and 
Craftsmen 



Lighting Fixtures 
Hand Wrought 
Iron, Brass and 
Bronze 



404 Washington Bldg. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Phone? Bdvvv. 3903—603-73 




AJEWPORT HARBOR YACHT CLUB: 
Stag Cruise to Ensenada, Mexico, May 
29 to June 3, inclusive. All Southern 
California yachtsmen participating. 
Saturday, June 16, Open Hou_-e at the 
California Yacht Club for Newport 
Harbor, Santa Barbara and San Diego 
Yacht Clubs. 

Saturday and Sunday, June 23 and 24, 
Newport Bay Regatta Days, official 
cruise and visit of California Yacht 
Club. 

Races — Schooner, Ketch and Yawl. 
Cruiser Race, around Catalina Island 
and return to Newport. 
Saturday, June 23, Open House at Club 
House for members and visitors, with 
dinner and dance in the evening. 
CALIFORNIA YACHT CLUB: 
^ Tuesday, May 29, to June 3, inclusive, 
stag cruise to Ensenada, Mexico, joint 
auspices California, Los Angeles and 
Newport Harbor Yacht Clubs. 
Saturday, June 16, Open House at 
California Yacht Club, Wilmington, 
California, for Newport Harbor, Santa 
Barbara and San Diego Yacht Clubs. 
T"!HE fourth annual exhibition of the 
Painters and Sculptors <>f Southern 
California, which opened May 4, in the 
Gallery of Fine and Applied Arts, Los 
Angeles Museum of History, Science and 
Art, will continue through June 17. The 
winners of the three prizes are as follows : 
Karl Yens of Laguna Beach, the William 
Preston Harrison prize for the best paint- 
ing in the exhibit, on his "Again the 
Meadow Lark" : Mabel Alvarez of Los An- 
geles, the prize ottered by the Federation 
of Women's Clubs, on "Self Portrait" ; 
and Norman Chamberlain of Pasadena, 
the Mrs. Henry E. Huntington prize, on 
"Adobe Flores". 

A T the Southwest Museum, Marmion Way 
and Avenue 46, Los Angeles, the stu- 
dents of the Los Angeles High School, 
and Junior High Schools are holding an 
exhibition of their work, including paint- 
ings, prints, metal art, pottery, batik, and 
weaving. The exhibition opened May 15 
and will continue through June 15. 

T EONARD'S, at 6814 Hollywood Boule- 
vard, formerly the Hollywood Art Shop, 
is the latest of the picture galleries, open- 
ing the middle of May with a showing of 
twenty-one canvases and three sculptures. 
The gallery has daylight illumination, and 
the wall space is sufficient for the exhibi- 
tion of about twenty canvases, which will 
be changed on the tenth of every month. 
As the space is limited no more than two 
canvases by any one man will be accepted 
for exhibition in one month, and usually 
only one canvas. 

]yr A R I O N KAVANAGH WACHTEL'S 
colorful California landscapes in wa- 
tercolor will be shown at the Cannell & 
Chaffin Galleries permanently beginning 
June 4th. For those who do not know her 
individual work, delay no longer to go 
see them and spare yourself regrets. There 
is no one interpreting the Southland more 
convincingly and it should be proud of her 
for it. Her pictures are owned all over 
the country which is enough to indicate 
how well her art is appreciated. 
OAINTINGS by Ferenc Imrey, the famous 
Hungarian artist, will be shown in 
Stendahl's Metropolitan Gallery, Grau- 
man's Theatre, Los Angeles, during June. 
rpHE Potboiler is settled in new quar- 
1 ters at 111 West Third street, Los 
Angeles, and will show paintings some- 
what higher in price than formerly. Each 
artist may enter two, and pictures are to 
hang for two months. There is no jury 
and no commissions. 

rPHE Spring Exhibition of the San Diego 
Art Guild was held in the Art Gal- 
lery of the San Diego Mussum, Balboa 
Park, during May. The exhibition in- 
cluded oil and water colors, land 'capes 
and figures. Sculpture was added for the 
first time, Cartaino Scarpitta exhibiting a 
number of pieces. 

TfRANK GARITZ and Arthur H. Millier 
are exhibiting etchings and wood block 

prints in La Jolla during the month. 

pAINTINGS by contemporary Dutch 
Masters will be shown in the Stendahl 

Galleries at the Maryland Hotel, Pasadena, 

during June. 

AN exhibition of landscapes, by Marie B. 

Kendall of Long Beach opened on 
Friday, May 18, at the Norse Club, 1444 1 /, 
Wilcox avenue, Hollywood, to continue for 
some weeks. 

rpHE Cannell and Chaffin Galleries are 
showing a remarkable collection of en- 
gravings by Italian, German and Dutch 
Primitives from May 29th to June 16th, 
inclusive. Exhibition comprises 87 orig- 
inal engravings from copper and wood, in- 
cluding a number of examples by Man- 
tegna. Albrecht Durer, Marcantonio Rai- 
mondi, Robetta and oth»r great engravers 
of the Renaissance. This is one of the 
finest collections of its kind in the coun- 
try. 

T^HE International Salon of the Pictorial 
Photographers of America at the Art 
Center. New York, is showing prints by 
the following local pictorialists : Viroque 
Baker, Hollywood : Louis Fleckenstein, 
Long B«ach ; Howard C. Cloves, Mrs. 
Millie Hoops, Arthur Kales, Ernest M. 
Pratt. John C. Hick. Los Angeles ; Clar- 
ence W. Tucker, Covina : Edward Weston, 
Glendale. and Otis Williams, Los Angeles. 
This would indicate that Los Angeles and 
vicinity is holding its own with the best 
in this country and abroad. This exhibi- 
tion is truly International, there b^ing 
prints from all parts of the United States 



4 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



and from England, Canada. Belgium, Aus- 
tralia, France, Sweden, Tunis, Austria, 
Switzerland, Japan, Holland, Norway, 
Czecho-Slovakia, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, 
Hungary, Mexico, Denmark and Italy. 

rpHE exhibition in the Stendahl Gallery 
at the Hotel Vista del Arroyo, Pasa- 
dena, during June, will consist of portrait* 
and landscapes by Robert Vonnoh, N. A. 

rPHE recent studio exhibition held by 
A Jean Mannheim proved to be one of the 
most popular of the year. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mannheim are at home to their friends 
every Sunday. 

T7DWARD POTTHAST, that clever 
painter of breezy beach-scenes with 
groups of happy children frolicking in the 
water and basking in the summer sun- 
shine will be given a show of his recent 
works at the Cannell and Challin Gal- 
leries June 4 to 16th. Mr. Potthast ex- 
presses pre-eminently the buoyancy and 
joy of childhood at play with vigor and 
distinction. His pictures glow with the 
vibrant color of nature's lavish palette. 
The quotation, "A thing of beauty is a 
joy forever" could never be better exem- 
plified than in his canvases which L'&ve 
received prizes and medals nt many im- 
portant exhibitions. He is also represent- 
ed in many museums and private co' lec- 
tions. 

TTENRI DE KRUIF is showing this 
month in the Art Gallery of the San 
Diego Museum, Balboa Park. 

A LSON S. CLARK and Orrin White have 
** gone down into Old Mexico on a qoeet 
for new material. Mr. Clark is particu- 
larly enthusiastic as to the result, feel'ng 
that he will continue the style of vork 
he began in Spain. Orrid White went 
more as a tourist than as a» artist but 
will doubtless bring back innumerable 
sketches. They went directly to Mevico 
City and will make their si J** trips from 
that point. Mr. Clark will probably be 
away all summer. 

TYANA BARTLETT has just returned 
from a neighborhood sketching tour 
which included the country around Mon- 
rovia. Glendora and Azusa. 

]VriSS LOREN BARTON has just con- 
eluded a remarkably successful exhibi- 
tion of her etchings at the Cannell ami 
ChafTin Galleries, the outstanding feature 
of which was the sale of move than haif 
the edition of her new drypoi it tuhii.gr, 
"Manuel*, a reproduction of A'hich illus- 
trates the article in this issue —"Five Cali- 
fornia Etchers". 

TACK WILKINSON SMITil and Mrs. 
" Smith, and Katherine Lelghton and 
Mr. Leighton will leave (une 13th on a 
sketching trip into the Canadian Rockies. 
They both have studio equipped cars, es- 
pecially built for living and painting pur- 
poses. 

A T the Stendahl Ambassador Gallery, 
Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles, paint- 
ings by Joseph Kleitsch, consisting of por- 
traits and landscapes, will be shown dur- 
ing June. 

TTARRY VINCENT'S paintings at the 
Kanst Art Gallery continue to hold the 
interest of art lovers. The "Old Spanish 
Salt Barque" in the harbor at Gloucester 
is a powerful work full of color, moist at- 
mosphere and movement. The "Fishing 
Boats" gives a picturesque view of the 
same famous old New England harbor. 

pARL L. STENDAHL has completed the 
purchase of the Art Galleries in the 
Maryland, Green, and Huntington Hotels 
in Pasadena, and The Hotel del Coronado 
in San Diego. This in addition to their 
well known Galleries in the Ambassador 
Hotel, in Los Angeles, which will continue 
to be the headquarters, will make a chain 
of Galleries for exhibition and sale of 
all the leading Western painters. This 
addition will thus enlarge and promote 
their already thoroughly established busi- 
ness and offer the American Art lovers 
unparalleled opportunity for wide range 
of comparison and choice of the best of 
the Western Artists. 

The opening exhibition was especially 
gratifying, as it included sixty-two can- 
vases by four well known Pasadena Art- 
ists, Guy Rose, Alson S. Clark, John Frost, 
and Orrin White. 

The Art lovers of the East are coming 
here every year and recognizing the merit 
and value of our artists, are buying lib- 
erally of their output. So this step is im- 
portant to the growth and development 
and will afford us an opportunity to keep 
pace with the constantly increasing de- 
mand. 

More than forty important shows have 
been held at the Stendahl Galleries within 
the past year and every week offers us 
fresh exhibitions and always new and bet- 
ter examples of the artists' work, not 
equaled in any Eastern city. 

rpEQE Pasadena RadelitTe Club announces 
an exhibition and sale of pictures 
from May 15th to June 15th at the home 
of Mrs. Thomas C. Austin, 470 La Loma 
Road, Pasadena, for the benefit of the 
Radcliffe College Endowment Fund. 

Music 

""PHE subscription tickets for the renewals 
by old subscribers to the Philharmonic 



Not Flint-like 



Carb 



on 



A 



which you must chisel out 
of motors 

LL motor oils deposit some carbonaceous residue, known 
as "carbon". No oil does otherwise. 

Hut there are two kinds of "carbon". That from some oils 
attaches to piston heads, spark plugs, and valves. It becomes 
hard and flint-like. And it stays. 

Chisels are required to remove it or acetylene torches to burn 
it oft. It is hard enough to score cylinder walls. 

Causes Four Motor 
Troubles 

This hard "carbon" acts as an abrasive, wearing cylinder 
wails, piston rings, bearings, etc. 

Parts of it often become incandescent, causing "knocking" 
due to pre-ignition. 

Other particles become attached to the spark plugs, short- 
circuiting the spark, so your motor misses. 

Still others work up under valves, causing bad seating and 
loss of compression, which means loss of power. 

And this hard "carbon" forms more quickly than another 
kind about which vou should know. 



Avoid Motor Oils 

containing paraffin, asphalt or any other 
non-lubricating substance. Aristo Oil is 
refined by the most advanced processes, 
designed to remove everything in the 
crude which has no lubricating value. 



1 

Orchestra concerts are ready for delivery 
and are being taken by almost everyone 
who held season tickets. The renewal 
privilege is open until June 2, and the 



The Other Is Soft 
and Fluffy 

The residue that Aristo Motor Oil deposits is of another 
kind. 

It is soft and fluffy so that most of it blows out with the 
exhaust. 

It is softer than your cylinders, pistons and bearings, so 
cannot scratch or wear them. 

Cars run thousands of miles farther without having valves ground 
or cylinders, pistons and spark plugs cleaned. Your motor retains 
full compression. It doesn't knock." 

With Aristo Oil motors get efficient lubrication without developing 
these troubles. They last longer, run more smoothly and give more 
power. 

Aristo is made by lubrication specialists equipped 
with every known facility for the production of a 
perfect motor oil. Used by famous drivers in the 
most gruelling tests. 

Try Aristo Oil for three months. Test it under 
all conditions. Note the improvement in the opera- 
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For sale at all first class service stations and 
garages. 

UNION OIL COMPANY 

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Alistp Motor Oil 




sale to new subscribers begins June !>. 
Practically all the neighboring towns have 
signed their orchestra contracts, a number 
of them adding an extra concert. 

^EXT season the Philharmonic Artists' 
Series will be given on Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings, the matinee series be- 
ing discontinued. 

The Tuesday evening series of twelve 
events will include Mary Garden and as- 
sisting artists, Mme. Frances Alda. prima 
donna soprano of the Metropolitan, in joint 
recital with Lionel Tertis, celebrated viol- 
ist : Tito Schipa. lyric tenor of the Chi- 
cgo Opera; Ossip Gabrilowitsch, pianist- 
conductor ; Jeanne (Jordan, contralto from 
the Metropolitan : the three lovely dancers. 
Anna, Lisa, and Margo Duncan : the well- 
beloved John McCormack ; one performance 
of the Russian Grand OpTa Company ; one 
program hy Anna Pavlowa and her com- 
pany. 

The Thursday evening series will include 
nine concerts, among them being Mme. 
Amelita Galli-Curci, Josef Lhevinne, pian- 
ist; Anna Case, American lyric soprano; 
Emilio de Gogorza. baritone: Efrem Zim- 
balist. violinist, a different program by the 
Russian Opera Company and by the Pav- 
lowa Ballet. 

r T , HERE has been formed in New York 
City a symphony orchestra of Ameri- 
can-born players with an American-born 
conductor. It is to be called the American 
National Orchestra and will be national 
and American in the fullest sense, a tour- 
ing orchestra of native musicians. The 
committee which has authorized the form- 
ing of the orchestra designated Howard 
Harlow as conductor. 

CAROLINE E. SMITH, manager of the 
~* Philharmonic Orchestra, is now in the 
East and will attend the biennial meet- 
ing of the Federated Music Clubs, June 
9-15. Ashville, N. C. Mrs. Smith will 
visit New Vork, Boston and Chicago, and 
will sign contracts to complete the list 
of soloists for the orchestra. 

'pHE University of Southern California 
announces the opening of its Summer 
Music Session, June 2, to continue to Aug. 
12. The course will be comprehensive and 
conducted as follows: Public School Music, 
Thadeus Giddings : Orchestration, Joseph 
E. Maildy : Piano Normal. Adelaide Trow- 
bridge : Harmony. Walter Allen: Harmony. 
Julia Howell : Mu-io History and Appre- 
ciation. Emma M. Rartlett: Music Appre- 
ciation in the Grades. Annie Marie Clark. 

rpHE forthcoming, first convention of Pa- 
cific Coast organists in I^os Angeles. 
June 26. 27 and 28, is attracting much at- 
tention and a large attendance of organ- 
ists from nearby and distant points is ex- 
pected. There will be at least five organ 
recitals, played by such organists as John 
Ooane of New York. Dr. H. J. Stewart 
of San Diego. Warren D. Allen of Stan- 
ford University, Allan Bacon of the Col- 
lege of the Pacific I San Josei and other 
organists of ability. These will be given 
on the large, four-manual organs at B-j- 
vard Auditorium (University of Southern 
California i. the First Presbyterian Church, 
and if completed by that time the new 
organ at First M. E. Church. 

JJKKMAN HELLER, one of the best 
known of San Francisco's orchestra 
conductors, recently of the California nnd 
the Granada theatres of that city, has 
been engaged as director for Grauman's 
Metropolitan Orchestra. 

TT is expected that approximately 700 
music teachers and visitors from all 
parts of California will attend the San 
Jose convention of the California State 
Music Teachers' Association the first week 
in July. The Committee of Arrangements 
include Homer DeWitt Pugh, Juanita 
Tennysen, Daisey Brinker, Marjory Fisher 
and Allan Bacon. 

Stainer's "Crucifixion" recently was beau- 
tifully sung by a choir of fifty voices at 
Trinity Church under the direction of L« 
Roy V. Brant, organist and choirmaster. 
Soloists were Edwin J. Ferguson, Tenor, 
and Frank Towner, baritone. 

IVTISS ANTONETTE RUTH SABEL, di- 
rector of the Chamber of Commerce 
Bureau of Industrial Music, has gone East. 
She will attend the biennial convention 
of the National Federation of Music Clubs, 
at Ashville. N. C, and will also stop in 
New York. Washington, D. C, Cincinnati, 
Philadelphia and Chicago in the interests 
of industrial music. 

pHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN is 
again back in his Hollywood home 
after having completed an extended East- 
ern trip. While in Chicago he had the 
pleasure of attending a performance of 
his opera, "Shanewis", presented by the 
"Opera in Our Language Foundation" with 
a notable cast and to a crowded house. 

T>OSA PONSELLE has returned to Los 
* Angeles after a series of appearances 
in San Francisco and the Northwest and 
will rest until her appearance in the Hol- 
lywood Bowl on Sunday afternoon. June 3. 

T OS ANGELES ORATORIO SOCIETY. 

225 voices ; John Smallman, conductor : 
Loma Gregg, accompanist : presented "Sam- 
son and Delilah," with the following solo- 
ists: Arthur Hackett, tenor, as Samson; 
Anna Ruzena Sprotte, contralto, as De- 
lilah ; Ettore Campana, baritone, as High 
Priest ; Henri de la Plate, basso cantante. 
as Abimelech ; Dr. Ray Hastings, organ ; 
and 50 principal members of the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra. Tuesday evening. May 1. 



CALIF ORN I A SOUTHLAND 



5 



r\N Monday, May 7, the Kdward H. An- 
gle Society of Orthodontiata and their 
friends met in the lecture room of the 
School of Orthodontia, 550 Jackson Street, 
Pasadena, to witness the unveiling of a 
beautiful mural decoration presented to the 
school by Mr. E. H. Wuerpet, Director of 
the School of Fine Arts, at St. Louis, an 
old friend of Dr. Edward H. Angle, who 
i i the founder of the Pasadena Society 
and School. 

Dr. Angle, in a preliminary address, 
spoke of the part Mr. Wuerpel had taken 
in the past history of his school, as in- 
structor in art as related to orthodontia, 
ti e artist giving freely of his resources 
of culture and enthusiasm to the students 
< f this science, as he was also doing with 
his own students of painting, and the ef- 
fects of his teachings are to this day re- 
flected in the lives and efforts of all who 
practic e orthodontia. 

From 1901 until 1908 the school was 
conducted in St. Louis. When Dr. Angle 
transferred his work to New York, and 
t. en to New London, Connecticut, Mr. 
Wuerpel came with undiminished enthusi- 
asm and without thought of remuneration 
to give his talks to the students, as if 
distance were no factor. 

The beautiful mural painting, 3% x 5 
feet, was then unveiled and was received 
with silence and then a burst of applause. 

The color is largely neutral blue-gre^n, 
a light, delicate yellow, and very little 
ivd-orange neutralized. It hangs above a 
fireplace of Batchelder tiles of related 
color. 

Mrs. Angle then read from a letter Mr. 
WuerpeTs own interpretation of the pic- 
ture: "I have tried in my trees and group- 
ing to symbolize you, your work, and the 
opposition which is bound to be overcome 
before anything succeeds. There are two 
groups of old birch trees, rather monu- 
mental, with their roots spreading over 
the earth. There are rocks and a pool 
separating these groups. A ripe field He.s 
beyond — the harvest. The trees are sturdy, 
representing strength. The roots repre- 
sent knowledge, the rocks the stumbling 
blocks, and the pool the reflected hope in 
the sky. In the distance a long row of 
trees, representing unity." 

Miss Wilhelmina Loos, Secretary of the 
Y. W. C. A., then spoke of her early 
a;sociations in the art life of St. Louis 
with Mr. Wuerpel, his idealism and his 
stimulating helpfulness to other artists, 
the magnitude of his own work and of 
her delight in this fresh example of it. 

Miss Ella Bush then spoke, expressing 
her appreciation of the work of a fellow- 
artist, analyzing the composition from the 
point of view of its Notan, or dark-and- 
light, the balance of its masses of dark, 
not equal in size, but made equal in im- 
portance by the smaller group cutting 
sharply the clear light of the sky space, 
which, looked at as a whole coming and 
going behind the trees, had a most beauti- 
ful shape, to be enjoyed as such, as the 
dark forms were also to be enjoyed, like 
lace patterns. In this way the observer 
doubles his joy in a fine picture, following 
the painter in his development of expressive 
arabesques of dark and light, interesting- 
objects, and beautifully shaped spaces be- 
tween them. 

The interplay of cool and warm colors 
in the composition were noted, and the way 
the observer was led from the foreground 
cf the picture over the rock to the pool, 
through the opening between the chief 
masses of trees to the yellowing grain- 
fields in the distance, then up to the open 
sky from which the quickening rays come 
to the earth below. All this symbolism 
is expressed by Mr. Wuerpel in terms of 
eoler and values, speaking a language 
distinctive to painting alone. 

Mrs. Stork then read with eloquence 
Kipling's "Craftsman's Prayer" : 

"If there be good in that I wrought, 
Thy hand compelled it. Master, Thine. 
Where I have failed to meet Thy thought. 
I know, through Thee, the blame is mine. 

"One instant "s toil to Thee denied 
Stands all Eternity's offence. 
With what I did with Thee to guide, 
To Thee, through Thee, be excellence. 

"Who, lest all thought of Eden fade 
Bringst Eden to the craftsman's brain, 
Godlike to muse o'er his own trade, 
And manlike stand with God again. 

"The depth and dream of my desire, 
The bitter paths in which I stray, 
Thou knowe.st Who hast made the fire; 
Thou knowest Who hast made the clay. 

"One stone the more sinks to her place 
In that dread temple of Thy worth. 
It is enough that through Thy grace 
I saw nought common on Thy earth. 

"Take not the vision from my pen ! 
Oh, whatsoe-er may spoil or speed. 
Help me to need no aid from men 
That I may help such men as need !" 

These words of Kipling apply to the work 
cf Dr. Angle throughout his entire career 
in establishing new theories and meeting 
with the opposition always shown to the 
innovator. The work itself is part of the 
great temple of modern science. 

There are many men who have retired 
from active life in profession and business 
who would double their joy in living if 
they should share their accumulation of 



JOHN S. KESHISHYAN 





Marshall Laird 

Reproductions of Fine Furniture 
Spanish, Italian, English, Colonial 




Tudor Log-box Adapted to Phonograph 



WORK SHOP: 

4 16 E. NINTH ST. 



PHONE: 660-72 
LOS ANGELES 



knowledge and skill with those who are 
coming on to the stage, eager for the best 
equipment. The old, old story of the run- 
ner with the torch yielding it to a young 
hand just as the race becomes too diffi- 
cult, is of age-old appeal. "Keep with 
the boys", said a great thinker. 

Dr. James C. Angle persuaded Dr. Ed- 
ward H. Angle to instruct him along the 
line of orthodontia when the former came 
to the Pacific Coast, and it was through 
his insistence that fresh classes were 
formed in the West. Instead of waiting 
for an endowment the money readily came 
from the science itself to equip and carry 
on the school. Finally, the well appoint- 
ed building was constructed by student-; 
cf Dr. Angle, chiefly those of Southern 
California, last fall. 

The spirit of the students may be 
summed up in the words of one of their 
number: "Orthodontia is not a science! 
It is a kind of religion !" And this one 
feels in listening to the words of their 
leader in regard to his life work — to help 
to make a more healthful as well as a 
more beautiful race, to re-create young 
faces as God meant them to l>2 to give 
to the poorest child the opportunity for 
this betterment, without money and with- 
out price, and to equip young scientists 
for the work in a school unique in it3 
absence of tuition fees. This is indeed to 
make many fruitful blades of grass grow 
where but one grew before, and sueh a 
man, James A. Garfield said, is a bene- 
factor to the human race. 

Announcements 

T^HE Community Arts Association of 
Santa Barbara announces that a sum- 
mer school of arts will be held, featuring 
courses in: Art and Music. June 25-Sep- 
tember 1. Drama and Aesthetic Dancing, 
July 9-September 1. Distinguished teach- 
ers, including Frank Morley Fletcher. 
Maurice Browne and Ella Van Volk-sn- 
burg Browne, of the School of the Arts 
of the Theatre, San Francisco, and Louis 
J. Sajous, teacher of singing, of New- 
York ; Ilya Bronson. For information ad- 
dress Secretary, School of Arts, 936 Santa 
Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

TXfE are glad to report that the Trustees 
** cf the College of the Pacific, Stockton. 
Calif., have voted to erect the first unit of 
the Administration Bui'ding this summer, 
in order to open school work this fall 
for local freshmen. They also voted to 
begin construction on all other buildings 
this spring, so as to have them ready for 
occupancy by the fall of 1924. This is a 
large undertaking, which will require much 
planning and work to accomplish. An 
early transfer to Stockton is necessitated 
by the condition of the San Jose plant 
and by the growing demand on the pari 
cf the Stockton people for the opening of 
the College. 

T^HE calendar of the Community Player i 
of Pasadena, in the Community Play- 
house for June is : 

May 30, 81, June 1, 2 Program of Four 
Prize Winning One Act Plays, from 1923 
Drama League Play Contest, in The Com- 
munity Playhouse. 

June 7 — Annual Dinner of Pasadena Com- 
munity Playhouse Association. 

June 11-16 — "The Altar of Innocence," by 
S. M. Ilsley, prize long-play from 11)23 
Drama League Contest. 

June 26-August 4 — Fourth Annual Session 
of the Summer Art Colony, under Com- 
munity Playhouse auspices. Apply at box 
office for Announcement. 

THE Board of Directors of the Com- 
munity Arts Association cf Santa Bar- 
bara held the annual meeting and tea for 
associate members Thursday afternoon. 
May 17th, at 3 :30 o'clock. Recreation 
Center. Prank Morley Fletcher spoke on 
"Artistic Values." There were brief re- 
ports on activities, informal tea and re- 
teption. 

pRINCESS SANTA BORGHESE of Rome, 
Italy, was entertained by a thousand 
women of Southern California at formal 
br t akfast at the Ambassador Hotel, May 26. 
Princess Borghese comes to the Pacific 
Coast to speak officially for the Italian 
Ministry of Education at the World's Con- 
ference on Education in Oakland during 
June. 

During her stay in Los Angeles she will 
be official guest of the city and the cham- 
ber of commerce. On May 31 she was the 
guest of Pasadena, visiting the Institute of 
Technology. Mrs. Maynard F. Thayer was 
chairman of arrangements. 
A graduate of the University of Bologna 
and leading English educational institu- 
tions, a leader in suffrage and artistic cir- 
cles in her own country, Princess Borg- 
hese brings a message of interest and 
friendship to the United States. 
pROGRAM for Commencement Week, 
Pomona College, Claremont, Calif. : 

Thursday, June 14 — 8:00 p. m., Recital 
of Seniors in Music, Bridges Hall. 

Friday. June 15 — Class Day. 

Saturday, June 16 — Alumni Day. 

Sunday, June 17 — Baccalaureate Sunday. 

Monday, June 18- Commencement Day. 

rpHE Monroe Doctrine Centennial, which 
is the first annual American Historical 
Revue and Motion Picture Industrial Ex- 
position, commemorating the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the Monroe Doc- 
trine, will be held in Exposition Park, Los 
Angeles. July 2 to August 4. 



When you are tired shopping 
or doing business in the city, 
seek 

The Assembly 
Tea Room 

You will find your friends 
there and a friendly atmos- 
phere of quiet and rest.. An 
hour at luncheon in the 
Garden 

will refresh you and the best 
of food sustain you. 

Near the Shopping District 
642 South Flower Street 
Los Angeles 



WlSSAHICKON INN 

Redlands, California 

At the Wissahickon Inn, a fam- 
ily hotel of fifty rooms, you will 
find a homelike place, good food, 
and careful attention to your 
wants. 

Steam heat. rooms with or 
without private bath. Cottages 
on the grou.ids. Near parks and 
Golf Course. Tennis court. Mag- 
nificent roads for motoring. 

For reservation and prices, ad- 
dress 

MRS A. B. JOHNSON. 



M T LOWE 



6100 Feet in Skyland 

America's Most Scenic 
Mountain Trolley Trip 

Fare $2.50 

From Los Angeles 
$2.10 from Pasadena 

A Year 'Round Resort — 
Delightful at All Seasons 

Five — Trains Daily — 8, 9, 
10 a. m., 1 :30, 4 p. m. 

From Main Street Station, 
Los Angeles 

Write for illustrated folder 



PA C I F I C 
ELECTRIC 
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Passenger Traffic Manager 
Los Angeles 



C A LI FO R N I A 


5 O U 1 


// /, A Y /) 


California 


So 


uthland 


M. Urmy Seares 




Editor and Publisher 


No. 42 




JUNE, 1923 




CONTENTS 



PAGE 

June in California Cuver Design 

(A Painting by Katharine Hunley) 

Entrance to Palm Canyon Contents Design 

A National Monument Aleyon Robinson 

The Golden Trail George Law 

A Painter of the Desert M. Urmy Seares 

Desert Canyons Henri De Kritif 

The Desert Birds Theresa Hornet Patterson 

Five California Etchers Arthur H. Millier 

Redlands Water George Hinkley 

Southland Opinion 14-15 

College Dramatics Ellen Leech 1(5-17 

Bulletin of the Architectural Club 18 

The Small House Service 19 

Scientific Matters for The Layman 20 

A Musical Studio Apartment 21 

(Webber, Staunton, Spauldiug, Architects) 

The Book of Robo Prentice Duell 23 

The Epicure's Pantry Maitre Cammille 24 

Planning a Mission City — Ventura. .Russell Van Nest Black 25 
The Money Market Leslie B. Henry 26 



This Magazine is the Official Organ of the Architectural Club of 
Los Angeles, California. 

CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND is published monthly at Pasadena, Cal. 

One dollar and twenty cents for six issues, two dollars for twelve 
For extra copies or back numbers call Main hOSU, L. A. News Co. 

Copyrighted. 1923. by M. Urmv Seares 

ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT AND RATES 
For Pasadena advertising call Colorado 7095 
For Los Angeles advertising call 820130 
or address California Southland, Advertising Manager, 
Pasadena, California. 



m 

Decorating and 


H 

Finishing Exclusive Furniture 


IV. ( 


j. T^esenecker 


iiiiiiiiiiiiillllliiii!iiii;i;ilitliltll]llilllllllli:iiililllililiiiltlilitl!liillitiiiiilllMiiiiiti.itliitliliMiiiiiiililliui 
rfjjw «". 






Interior 


and Exterior Painting 


34 


North Broadway 


Phone Col. 5656 


Pasadena, Calif. 

B i 



THE MERR1MAC 

A small family ho^el 
Center of Pasadena 
Moderate prices 
60 South Euclid Avenue 



Business Hours 8:30 to 5 

Interviewing Hours 9 to I 
Telephones: 822-259; 822 250 

WOMEN'S VOCATIONAL 
ALLIANCE 
of Los Angeles 
Winifred M. Hausam, Director 
4 14 Delta Bldg.. 426 South Spring 



Hawaii The Orient 

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"Tickets to All the World" 
507 So Spring St., Los Angeles 

Alexandria Hotel Bldg. Main 410 
Raymond and Whitcomb Tours 



South America 



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THE ELITE 

DRY CLEANERS AND DYERS 
Plant: 797 So. Fair Oaks Ave. 
Colo. 1349 Pasadena, Cal. 



MARGARET CRAIG 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Photographs Taken in Your Own 
Home 

610 So. Western Ave.. Los Angeles. 
Telephone 56254 




THE PEACOCK 
Delicious Food — Daintily Served 
Luncheon — Afternoon Tea 
Dinner 

Dinner Every Night $1.00 
Chicken Dinner Tuesdays and 
Thursdays $1.50 
SPECIAL DINNERS 
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Fair Oaks 179 



La Solano 

A quiet, well-appointed small 
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CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF NATIONAL INTEREST 




THE MONUMENT OF PALMS— CALIFORNIA 



% ALCYON ROBINSON 

Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce 




WHEN the Mammoth and the Dodo and the Dinosaur played 
together on the shores of the long ago Southern California, 
they gamboled in titanic circles under palm trees. Today, scientists 
are digging up the bones of Saber Tooth Tigers from the tar pits 
and are finding petrified palms in the regions bordering the Colorado 
Desert. But the palms have the advantage over their dinosaur 



neighbors; there are extant sons and daughters of these monarchs 
of the dim ages, glorious sentinels waving their green fans in the 
breezes of Palm Valley and the three canyons cutting up from the 
valley floor into the San Jacinto Mountains. 

The native palms, practically the only remaining groups of wild 
palms in the country, are older than "the oldest living things on the 



8 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



face of the earth," as the giant Redwoods are called. They date 
back to a period long before the Sequoias took root on California soil, 
before the days of Rameses II, if you please. 

To preserve the Ancient Order of Palms, the Federal Govern- 
ment will make a national Monument of Palms of Palm Canyon, 
according to the provisions of the Congressional bill recently signed 
by President Harding. It was through the tireless efforts of the 
chambers of commerce of Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino 
and other enterprising communities and individuals that the need for 
protecting these unique monarchs came to the eyes of the government. 
Careless picnickers and movie outfits have a tendency to disregard 
the preciousness of the natural beauties, while hunters have almost 
destroyed the herds of big-horn sheep that roam the San Jacinto 
mountains. 

Beside the deprivation to scientists, the disappearance of the 
palms would mean irretrievable loss to the artists of the desert. The 
beauty and fascination of these hoary sentinels of wide wastes have 
drawn many a writer and painter from civilization, from the com- 
forts and the conventional life of cities, and kept him until he fell 
in love with the desert. 

"In love with the desert," you may repeat with a shudder, 
thinking of the tales of "the days of old, the days of gold, the days 
of '49," when the bones of prospectors and their pack animals lay 
bleaching side by side, more often than you wish to recall. 

But these are the days of '22, and with modern times have come 
manifold changes on the face of the Southern California deserts. 

Palm Springs, a stage stop-over in the early days, on the road 
to Virginia Dale, then the mining district of the Morengo Hills, 40 
miles away, is now a rlorishing winter resort. Ten miles from a 
railroad, reached over perfect macadam boulevards from the desert 
station of Whitewater or by the State highway — for the greater part 
of the journey, Palm Springs is a colorful little village of adobe 
houses, brightly painted and gaily named — "The Dolls' House," 
"Sunshine Shanty," "The Jazz Apartments," "The Painted Lady," 
"Babylon," or "Fool's Folly," and "The Little Grey Nun." An excel- 
lent hostelry is the nucleus of the place — its cool green oleanders and 
palms, orange groves and palo verdes are in pleasant contrast to the 
glaring desert sun. The dining rooms are in a central building, but 




REPLETE WITH THE NOVEL INTEREST OK CURIOUS PLANT LIFE THE 
DESERT AMUSES AS WELL AS INSPIRES. JOSHUA TREE (YUCCA 
BRERIFOLIA ) MOJAVE DESERT 

the guests are quartered in the restful little bungalettes scattered 
over the hotel grounds, shaded with fig trees and date palms. Lest 
we sound like an advertisement for the place, we won't mention its 
delectable table, fresh strawberries and green peas, new lima beans, 
et cetera, that are brought daily from Imperial Valley. 

The term "desert de luxe" best describes the comfort and charm 
of the "Valley of the Sun." One hundred miles from the bright 
lights of Broadway, Los Angeles, the most complete isolation is pos- 
sible under the purple wing of San Jacinto Mountains. And you may 
believe the business men of the country have sought out this refuge 
in the hour of extremity! For there are no telephones in Palm 
Springs — or rather, we should say, there is one telephone in the town. 



A coterie of bankers, railroad presidents, writers, artists and 
other interesting folk gather there to rejuvenate, ride in the desert 
sun and walk beside the still waters of the palm-lined canyons. They 
have returned again and again to experience the soul-renewing days 
of desert wandering and rejoice as did another in the re-creation of 
solitudes in the Holy Land: 

"One . . . walked every day . . . 
The quiet waters by — 

Reading their beauty with a tranquil eye. 
To Him the desert was a place prepared 
For weary hearts to rest." 

Oh! the exhilaration following a plunge in the warm sulphur 
pools in Palm Canyon. The joy of stretching out flat — flat as a 
brown lizard sunning himself on the same boulder and to feel your 
batteries recharging. There is a certain elemental something about 
this desert; this cutting yourself off and getting "in tune with the 
Infinite" is quite as uplifting as a church service. It does indeed 
recharge your spiritual batteries. 

The desert is indeed more like the magnificent cathedrals of 
France than anything else 1 know. Dignity, beauty, simplicity and 
rich coloring are the keynotes of both desert and church. And is 
not the organ of the winds, sweeping down Tahquitz or through the 
Gorgonio Pass, the original music of the universe? Not more shining 
and splendid are the brasses and communion cups in the chancel than 
suneups and incense bushes shimmering in the desert sun. 

Behold the waxen blossomy stalks of yucca whipellei, rising ten 
feet against a blue canopied sky! Do they not remind us of the 
"holy candles" of high mass. Spread beneath these are the white 
altar cloths of the desert — white, all Easter white are the desert 
thistle, miniature daisies and evening primroses; and no Persian 
carpet is more exquisite in royal colors than the desert's spring cover 
of flowers. 

More beautiful are the desert gardens than formal plots about 
city mansions or well-kept country estates. And the reason for the 
gorgeous array is a heavy rainfall. Never in the memory of the 
Indians dwelling there has there been such an outpour of blossoms 
from the sky — and neither can the United States weather man recall 
dispensing eleven inches of rain before. Three inches is the normal 
output of winter time rain. 

Imagine if you can, acres upon acres of color — fields of the 
purple-pink glory — this is the sand verbena — abronia auritus — the 
"darling of the desert." Then there are true "purple patches" of 
willowy brodia, swaying lightly to every soft breeze, and knee high 
in lupine you can walk for happy miles. Coral flowers, wild helio- 
trope, and tiny blue forget-me-nots, desert mist and flaming, cardinal- 
red honeysuckle hedges are scattered between the soft grey-greens 
of mesquite and manzanita, cactus and arrowweed. Red, white and 
blue is the great American desert, flinging wide its colorful banners! 



THE GOLDEN TRAIL GEORGE LAW 

THK California desert has always been a land of golden trails. 
The brown wastes of pinnacled ranges have never ceased to lure 
man on and on in the feverish quest for gold. But it is not of such 
trails, too often ending in blight and tragedy, that I am going to 
tell. There is another sort of trail so golden all along the way as 
to banish thoughts of quest in the flood of realized delight. It is a 
creation of the desert springtime, an effulgence of gold out-cropping 
from the hills. Surely the immigrants of old must have noticed it 
along the trails and stage routes; but in their lust for mineral 
treasure it was to them a worthless and unrecognized gold. 

Quite different is the case with us of this later day, to whom 
the desert is less a frontier for exploitation and more a wilderness 
sweet in responses to the innermost man. Never is there such heart's 
rejoicing as when, for a time, the loud rushing world is discarded, 
and we take our way into the Golden Trail. 

A few animal companions are congenial to the peregrination — 
the saddle-ponies and the pack burro, constant dwellers in the wild 
places, ever willing to welcome us back. It seems at times as though 
these ungulate friends, so amenable to control after weeks or even 
months of free ranging, are actually glad to see us again and make 
themselves of service. But for them, sparing our unaccustomed 
muscles with their ever fit sinews, and packing the things of our 
civilized need, we could not keep appreciation quite so fresh, nor 
could we remain for magic interludes of unworldly days in the lovely 
haven at the end of the trail. 

Our particular Golden Trail — for the wide desert has as many 
as there are golden-trailers to seek them out — leads from the creosote- 
covered habitat of the jack-rabbit and the road-runner in the north 
end of the Salton Basin up through the boulder-strewn fan of a 
wide canyon. Long ago a road was constructed from the village 
of Palm "Springs up into Chino Canyon to enable the piping out of 
the mountain water supply. But heavy rains washed the fill from 
between the boulders, leaving the way accessible only by trail. The 
rise in five miles of rough and rocky windings and turnings is 2,000 
feet. This is unbelievable to the eye; but the trip is not popular 
because of its severity. 

Replete with the novel interests of curious plant life and exhil- 
arating in the fineness and magnitude of the views at all times of 
year, — except for most people during the tormenting heat of sum- 
mer—the trail dons its lustrous robes of gold in the springtime. 
Then it is lined from end to end and banked from side to side with 
an amazing burst of golden flowers. 

Nothing could be more startling and entrancing than this sudden 
burst of desert bloom. Sere and pale the rest of the time, graphi- 
cally representing to our fancy the landscape of the moon, suddenly 
in the passing of frostv nights the desert awakens to an ecstatic 
morn of brilliant and shimmering bloom. Plants nursed inconspicu- 
ously into being by the winter rains open wild-flower faces to the 
sun" The somber "thin-leafed shrubs become mantled with dainty 



C A LI F O RN I A SOUTHLAND 



9 



blossoms of rich and varied hues. Even the bayonet yuccas and the 
bristling needly cacti adorn themselves with pearls and gems of 
perfect flower forms. Is there any other land where every plant 
from tiniest annual to hardiest shrub joins thus in a universal paean 
of flowery rapture? 

Out in the open desert the billows of sand are lighted with 
the flames of pink sand-verbenas; other wide areas claimed by 
"desert fragrance," a refinement of the sun-flower, give off a sunnier 
glow. The olive-green foliage of the creosote bushes at the foot of 
the canyon detritus is starred with yellow flowers, some of which are 
tufting rapidly into cottony seeds. The creosotes mount up with us 
through the rocks, but the company increases and becomes richly 
varied. 

Shortly the trail enters its zone of showered gold. The low 
mounds of encelia farinosa, as abundant as the boulders they hedge 
and mass between, bedim all other flowers with their radiant sheen. 
Their glowing gold clings like a heavy fluid atmosphere, enveloping 
all objects in its warm luminosity. The rocky desert slopes may 

THE TRAIL DONS ITS LUSTROUS ROBES OF GOLD IN THE SPRING TIME 
AND LEADS TO A LOVELY OASIS IN THE HILLS 





THE PROCESSION OF PALMS Ur PALM CANYON. THE MOST EXTENSIVE OF ALL THE GROVES OF WILD PALM IN THE THREE CANYONS RECENTLY 

MADE A NATIONAL MONUMENT BY ACT OF CONGRESS 




ENCELIA FARINOSA. CALLED THE SAGE MARGUERITE. WITH SILVERY 
FOLIAGE AND FLOWERS OF GLOWING GOLD 



hold their secret stores of yellow treasure, but no wrested out 
amounts of it could ravish the soul with the gladness of this flower- 
gold poured forth in unrestrained abundance. 

We call these flowering bushes sage-marguerites, as this name 
seems to include them closer in the family of our plant friends. 
From the silvery foliage, a bit sagey in smell, the slender flower 
stalks project in great numbers not unlike marguerites. The flowers 
call to mind daisies and brown-eyed susans as well. 

Many other flowering shrubs sprinkle lovely gems of purple, 
lavender, red white and intermediate hues along the Golden Trail. 
The large cactus flowers amaze with the delicacy and beauty of 
their forms and colors, to come forth from so villainous a sour- e 

So with many pauses, agreeable for other reasons to the ponies 
and burro who puff a few moments and then begin to munch the 
grass-tufts and burroweed, we move leisurely up the trail. And 
though the Golden Trail is a means so richly furnished with beauty 
as to be reward enough in itself, still the end to which it leads is 
even more to be coveted. The sun sinks behind the mountain, but 
before long we enter a sort of real fairyland, green, fresh, alive with 
birds and filled with the soft murmur of running water — a lovely 
oasis where the desert and mountains meet. 



10 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



A PAINTER EVOLVING IN THE SOUTHLAND 



"By M. URMY SEARES 



The eagerness with which the spirit of art is working in the 
Southern part of California is worthy of careful study and record. 
Unless someone analyzes and differentiates, selects and guards the 
best growth of our art tendencies, we shall always continue to have 
a mongrel art fed and made mediocre by constant streams of con- 
tributions from all parts of the country. 

Mr. Antony Anderson's casual remark in the Los Angeles Times 
of May quotes some irresponsible person as comparing San Fran- 
cisco's art with our own painting — "now becoming 'universal,' the 
older, local or provincial!" For fifty years the art students of 
San Francisco have had the best art of the world for examples; 
and painters trained in the best studios of Europe for teachers. 
There has, therefore, developed around the Bay an art founded on 
universal knowledge of art and yet made of local character by the 
love which native Califoi nian's feel for their environment. This 
art of San Francisco is distinctive, simple in mass as that of the 
Venetians. Like the child in the home, it is the most precious thing 
in the art of California. It was developed by hard work under 
rigid authority, and Southern California can never compete with it 
until she knuckles down to work and comprehending all that has 
been accomplished in the art of painting in other countries, pro- 
duces something local and worth while. 

Rich in tonal effect, appealing to the highest thought of art 
lovers, San Francisco's art is unique. Its examples are hidden in 
the seclusion of private galleries or as murals, decorate the inner 
rooms of great corporations or of public buildings. It is not a pro- 
lific art. Appreciation of art, and talent are two different growths 
which must be cultivated side by side. Here in the South we have 
excellent exhibitions of the best work of America at the Cannell 
and Chaffin galleries. So eager are our young artists to see and 
study these modern painters that Mr. Cannell has had to set aside 
two hours a day — from 9 a. m. to 10 a. m. and from 4 p. m. to 5 p. m. 
— for them, that they may see the good things closely and still leave 
the middle of the day absolutely free for patrons of art who wish 
to sit quietly in the galleries studying pictures they want to hang 
on their own walls. Our splendid Print Makers International yearly 
sets before our art students the best in line work and sets a stand- 




KATHAKINK 



I.IKE THE ATLANTIC PAINTERS. CAN MAKE THE 



SKY PATTERN A PICTURE AND ITS MAIN MOTIVE. 

aid in draughtsmanship. Our public schools teach design and a 
glimpse of the crafts. 

From this matrix of art appreciation are arising artists who 
will one day form a native Southland School of Art. The desert will 
play its part and our art will be distinctive. See the beginning of this 




BEFORE THE GLOWING COLOR OF THE PAINTED CANYON KATHARINE HUNLEY PLACES A LIVE OAK. MAKING A SCREEN OF CONTRASTING COLOR 
WHICH ENHANCES THE BEAUTY OF THIS "WONDER OF THE WORLD." PHOTOGRAPHS BY BAILEY. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



11 



school in the work of Katharine Hunley whose lovely interpretation 
of June on Mount San Jacinto is reproduced on our cover this month. 
Carefully this artist — trained in Eastern schools in fundamentals 
but working hard for years in the environment she paints — selects 
the elements that will best express California's clear, dry atmos- 
phere. But when she goes alone for days to paint the desert or the 
Grand Canyon, she is atune to her own local landscape and is not 
thinking what tourist may be pleased with her painting. 

Before the glowing color of the painted canyon she places a 
live-oak, making a screen of contrasting color which enhances the 
beauty of this "wonder of the world." Another of this painter's 
studies shows that like the Atlantic painters, she can make the sky 
pattern a picture and its main motive. But the sky is her own sky 
and not that of the Eastern painter or one copied from some other 
local painter. 

These are the elements from which the Southland will bring to 
a climax its desultory work in a native art. Better teachers in 
drawing, harder work at the figure and life class, and then the free 
air of California blowing through our studios. Blowing away tra- 
dition, excepting as it helps like the steps of a ladder. Blowing 
away our fear that we can't sell to the tourists and leaving us free 
to follow our own bent. 

Desert Canyons 

SHOULD an artist betray the allurements of his favorite sketching 
grounds to the ever curious public? This question comes to my 
mind as I think of what untold pleasure I derive from my annual 
sketching trips to the Desert Canyons of the Coachella Valley. These 
pearls of mental and spiritual pleasure that mean so much to me, 
arid which I strive in my way to interpret in my water-color painting, 
— these one hesitates to cast under the feet of the unappreciative, 
they who have eyes to see but see not. For one may go to these can- 
yons and see nothing, or he may go and see for himself the poten- 
tialities of a Paradise Restored. 

Every spring for the past four years I have paid my call upon 
the desert and a few of its canyons, and each year the fascination 
grows. There is a suggestion of the South Sea Islands. There one 
finds the male mountains and the female desert united in one ecstatic, 
colorful, embrace. In these canyons one senses the primeval romance 
of the lost paradise. There one finds not only colorful, titan rocks 
■ a nd rushing water midst the undulating mingling of the desert grays 
arid browns with the fresh tropical greens, but one with due rever- 
ence may view the procession of native palms and fancy them march- 
ing in stately and rythmic order down between the prismatic walls, 
waving their plumed heads in the breeze. Like a gigantic "Tri- 
umphal Entry" it is all there to inspire a symphonic composer, or a 
painter of mystic poetry. 

Henri De Kruif. 

THE BIRDS OF THE DESERT 




IN THE DESERT CANYONS OF COACHELLA VALLEY, AS PAINTED BY 
HENRI DE KRUIF, "ONE SENSES THE PRIMEVAL ROMANCE OF THE 

LOST PARADISE." 



"No sound is uttered, 

But a deep and solemn harmony pervades the 

hollow vale 
From steep to steep." 

Who hasn't likened the silence of the des- 
ert to the hush of a great cathedral. Next 
to its color that impresses one most. At 
noonday the color fades away and the glare 
of the sun on the sand is broken only by the 
scattering small-leafed or leafless shrubbery. 
In this battle with heat and drouth the plant 
can not afford the evaporation resulting from 
broad leaves. In the scant and shortened 
shadows such birds as there are are crouching, 
scarcely visible in their protective coloring. 
The bill is open, the eye less alert. There is a 
pause in that almost ceaseless quest for food 
during the burning noonday — a truce as it 
were, in which the fly is unmolested by the 
lizard, the lizard is safe from the Road Run- 
ner, the Road Runner need not fear being 
snapped up by the wild cat, nor he in turn by 
the eagle. 

The Vultures never seem to rest. With them 
it is eternal vigilance, they are always a part 
of the sky, sailing in great circles for hours 
together without a flap of the wing. Pro- 
pelled by some power unknown they become a 
part of the great silence and mystery of the 
desert. 

It is only at day break that the Condor sails 
out from his mountain eerie over the adjacent 
valleys. Spiraling upward to twenty-five thou- 
sand feet he "listens in" at Heaven's gate but 
keeps his eye on the earth to which he drops 
at sight of food. With a wing stretch of ten 
feet he is exceeded in size only by his cousin — 
the Condor of the Andes. He looks like an old 
bald-headed man with an exaggerated nose, 
wearing a feather ruff about his neck, meditat- 
ing upon his sins of omission. His reach ex- 
ceeds his grasp for his feet are not made for 
seizing and carrying. He, like all vultures, 
is a scavenger, eating food where it is found 
and feeding the young by regurgitation. 
Whether vultures see or scent food is a ques- 
tion which their finding covered carrion might 
help to decide. The Condor, once plentiful in 
this state, is now a rare bird, having been the 



victim of poison intended for the enemies of 
grazing flocks. 

The Eagles and Hawks, like the Vultures, 
can cover great distances. They can sleep in 
the high mountains, lunch in the deep canyons 
and dine in distant desert valleys. The Eagle 
feeds on the snake and then on a bird, or both 
at once, in case the snake has just swallowed 
the bird. This is meat and drink to him fortu- 
nately and he is quite indifferent to water. 

The Owls and Bats come out of caves at 
night and our small birds can not even sleep 
in safety. The Elf Owl, who un-owl-like, 
wears no eartufts, uses holes made by the 
woodpeckers, especially in the saguaros, which 
become veritable apartment towers. The 
saguaro is the fluted column of the desert and 
where they are grouped they look like a ruined 
temple. The woodpeckers excavate, and the 
oozing sap hardens, making a varnished in- 
terior. No wonder our little Elf likes it for 
his home. 

The Burrowing Owl lives in holes in the 
ground dug by himself if necessary, but he 
chooses those of the prairie dog and badger 
and isn't particular about his company, so they 
say. They have little fear and may be seen 
along the roads in day time. 

The Cactus Wren builds his nest where 
bristling spines ward off enemies. The marvel 
is that he can get in without scratching out 
both his eyes. His nest is built with a roof 
and side entrance like the Verdin which builds 
in the thorn or crucifixion tree. Both birds 
build dummies or decoy nests which they use 
for roosts. The covered nest protects from 
the sun, and enemies of the air day and night. 
Wrens are fine singers the world over, bubbling 
with joy, but such a song coming out of desert 
places carries a thrill. When the full liquid 
notes of the Canyon Wren roll down the scale 
a soul is put into the canyon. The Rock Wren 
sings as he searches the barren canyon walls 
for spiders and bugs. 

The Thrushes are among the finest singers. 
They greet the morn and sing the day to sleep, 
trilling, and trying new melodies and old well 
into the night. True to the desert spirit they 
are brilliant morning and evening and quiet 
through mid-day. 



% THERESA HOMET PATTERSON 

The Horned Larks are a part of dusty 
roads. In companies, except when nesting, 
they fly just ahead of the car settling and ris- 
ing again in playful manner. Their song 
happy and plentiful at all times is sung Sky 
Lark fashion in courting season. Babies are 
hatched under the sage brush, and the first 
lesson is in dust bathing. Two little bunches 
of feathers, raised and lowered at will, give 
them their name, and their funny appearance 
is increased by a drooping dark line from the 
bill looking like an old-fashioned moustache. 
In contrast to this road flyer is the Road Run- 
ner whose ancestors must have been trained 
for the Olympic games else he could not feed 
on the lizards that run as swiftly as a cloud 
shadow. When an attempt is made to pass 
him he shoots ahead like a Pierce Arrow with 
his sidewise gait, keeping one eye on the road 
and the other on his pursuer. Turning out 
he stops so suddenly that he would skid his 
tires if he had any. With top-not raised and 
open mouth his hunger battles with the desert. 

Gamble Quail are not confined to one sec- 
tion but they love the boulders along the foot 
of the mountains and travel long distances for 
water, chatting as they go in happy companies 
and eating grasshoppers, ants, wild grain and 
berries along the way. They roost in trees as 
the animals that hunt by night would not miss 
such a delicious morsel. 

Nearly every desert plant has some protec- 
tion — spine, thorn or odor. Nothing- but the 
Sage Hen and Jack Rabbit will eat the sage, 
and furthermore the Sage Hen eats the cactus 
fiuit, drinks the alkaline water, keeps her back 
warm with a snow bank in winter and sets 22 
days in the broiling sun of the Great Basin in 
summer. The new chicks shake the shells 
from their backs and without a bit of instruc- 
tion from mother dash after bugs and twigs. 
At night mother is the hub from which the 
little heads protrude as numerous as the 
spokes in a wheel. 

Where a little water comes to the surface 
and willows appear, there will be Red-winged 
Blackbirds and Yellow Warblers and perhaps 
a Phainopepla and Song Sparrow. There will 
be Fly-catchers, by chance a Meadow-lark. If 

(Continued on page 20) 



12 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



CALIFORNIA'S ETCHERS 



<B 7 

ARTHUR H. MILLIER 



Etcher and Curator 

CANNELL end CHAFF1N GALLERIES 



ON LOOKING over a representative group of prints by California 
;tchers, it is at once apparent that those artists in our midst who 
have chosen the copper plate as their medium of expression, follow 
strong personal tendencies, showing no sign of a "school" in their 
styles. Pausing to consider the comparative youth of this art in the 
West, we are amazed to meet in these prints accomplished craftsmen 
who have "arrived," unhampered for the most part by tradition, at 
the forefront of American etching. 

Five marked personalities stand out of contemporary Californian 
etchings, though it is not impossible that among those whose work is 




ONE OF THE OLD HOUSES OF SENORA-TOWN. ONCE THE HOME OF 
ROMANCE, NOW A CONTAINER OF GROCERIES. AN ETCHING BY 
ARTHUR H. MILLIER. 

less striking may lie more subtle artists whose work will prove the 
most attractive to connoisseurs of the future. The five, however, 
with whom the present article deals are: Armin Hansen, Miss Loren 
Barton, Roi Partridge, John W. Winkler and Ernest Haskell. 

Haskell commenced to etch in Paris in 1910. Previous to his first 
essay in this medium he had already achieved fame as an illustrator 
for Collier's and the New York papers. His portraits of stage folk, 
particularly that of Mrs. Fiske, had a great vogue, so that he came 
to etching with a splendid background. His first etchings were tiny 
prints remarkable for their freedom and delicacy. Here was an 
etcher born in the fulness of his power, achieving at once his "Paris 
Set," prints so charming and so delicate that they are today unobtain- 
able on the market. Only one set is known to exist in the West. 
They consist of brief sketches of children, cabmen, old bonnes, street 
corners, touched in with the sensitive point of an intuitive etcher. 
Subsequently, in Monterey and San Francisco he developed an unusual 
manner which, combined the restrained use of the graver with the 
freedom of the etched line, producing such beautiful prints as "Baby 
Sequoia," and "Wildcat Canyon." His "Hilltop" is a stipple engraving, 
a work requiring such sustained interest as is rarely encountered in 
a modern etcher. Essentially an impassioned craftsman, he has 
experimented with every method of producing prints from copper, 
and is now occupied with original mezzotints of very indiviudal char- 
acter. 

John W. Winkler has immortalized San Francisco's Chinatown and 
the quaint Spanish and Italian tenements of Telegraph Hill. At 
the suggestion of the well-known print dealer, Mr. E. H. Furman, 
of San Francisco and Los Angeles, Winkler, who had already become 
known as a painter, essayed his first etching in 1915, inspired by 
the interest in etching prevalent during the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition. His career as an etcher was by no means an 
easy one, but with unflagging zeal he set himself to master the new 
medium. He lived almost in the heart of Chinatown and steeped 
himself in the peculiar atmosphere of this little Orient in the West, 
and slowly but surely a series of etchings grew which have since 
become known and loved throughout the nation. After his first 
exhibition, which was very successful, instead of drawing out the 
money for current necessities, he devoted the proceeds to the purchase 
of the finest Rembrandt etching obtainable for the entire sum 
brought in by the sale of his prints. This etching, "The Triumph 
of Mordecai," he hung above his work table, and when he found 
himself suffering from what he called "over-confidence," it was only 
necessary to raise his eyes to the work of the master etcher and he 
would in a spirit of reverence and humility recommence his labors. 
This throws much light on the character of the man who, through 



continuous concentration, has achieved a knowledge of the art cf etch- 
ing second to that of no American etcher. Some of his finest plates 
are, "Old Wharves of San Francisco", "The Delicatessen Maker", 
"Oriental Alley", and "North End of Telegraph Hill". 

Roi Partridge, like Haskell, first felt the magic touch of needle on 
copper in Paris, where in 1909 he shared a studio with the eminent 
American etcher, William Auerbach Levy, and in the intervening 
years he has produced a series of etchings in which the personal 
quality is remarkably constant. He does not seem to change much, 
this vigorous etcher, though his motifs show plenty of variety. The 
same broad, dramatic handling, the same love of decorative masses, 
and a passionate intellectuality assert themselves in all his plates, 
whether he be concerned with the towers of Notre Dame, rising amid 
misty Parisian skies, or the cold fury of northern gales blasting the 
pines about the aged head of Mount Takhoma. In such a colorful 
tour-de-force as "Hillside Quarry", San Francisco, or the warmer 
drowsy prints done in Southern California, the same personality is 
evident. The first requirement of the artist according to Nietsche 
is that he should know, "who he is, himself." Roi Partridge is an 
etcher who, judged by his work, has much self-knowledge, and that 
is why he has always something interesting to tell us. 

Loren Barton is our very own etcher. Already a talented painter 
and draughtsman, it was only a few short summers ago she took 
up the fascinating pursuit of acid and copper. Her etching, like her 
personality, is always delightfully feminine. Deeply impressed from 
early childhood by the elusive beauty of Whistler's canvasses and 
prints, her faculty for elimination and centralization was already 
•highly developed and she was from the beginning free to bend her 
efforts toward that thing coveted by etchers — quality. This, as many 
a delicate and sensitive print testifies, she has achieved. Her dry- 
point portrait of George Arliss as Disraeli, brought her national 
fame and many connoisseurs have included first prints from her 
plates in their collections. She was recently occupied for some months 
on a series of etchings for Henry E. Huntington of his estate, prints 
which one hopes will be publicly exhibited before long. Her subject 




• MANUEL." AN ETCHING BY LOREN BARTON. LOS ANGELES. WHICH IS 
THE SENSATION OF THE ART SEASON AT CANNELL AND CHAFFINS. THE 
YOUNG CAIiALLFRO. HIS EYES NARROWED ALMOST TO SLITS, LOOKS OUT 
AT YOU FROM THE SHADE OF HIS HUGE SOMBRERO. HIS CLOAK FOLDS 
ABOUT HIM WITH THAT ARISTOCRATIC DISDAIN THAT PROCLAIMS THE 
TRUE SON OF SPAIN. AND FROM HIS LIPS DROOPS THE UNFAILING 

CIGARETTE 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



13 




THE SARDINE BARGE, AN ETCHING BY ARMIN HANSEN, SAN FRANCISCO, 
AWARDED THE LOS ANGELES GOLD MEDAL AT THE FOURTH PRINT- 
MAKER'S INTERNATIONAL 1923. THIS MEDAL IS GIVEN BY THE LOS 
ANGELES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



matter includes old buildings in the French Quartier of New Orleans, 
"The Hudson River," San Francisco's Waterfront and Chinatown, 
and Old Los Angeles, its Spanish and Chinese quarters. 

Armin Hansen, son of California, man of the sea like his Norse 
forefathers, has broken into the ranks of the nation's foremost etch- 
ers, with a series of tiny prints of such outstanding quality that 
they are instantly recognized wherever prints are loved and under- 
stood. He has etched for some years, but his work bore the marks 
of the painter rather than the etcher, of the artist working in mass 
rather than in line. Now, however, his needle runs over the plate 
with a living and expressive line that is the envy of his fellows. Air, 
moist with spray, wet sand mirroring the sky, sea gulls riding the 
wind, and calling with half human voices, these set the stage for 
his rugged, weather-beaten fisher-folk of Monterey whom he paints 
and etches. Sea-going man himself, he knows his people and boats, 
and in those tiny plates, drawn, bitten and printed with all the ten- 
derness of a strong man, makes them live again amid the elements. 
"Storm", with waves beating wreckage against the sand, where stand 
the anxious watchers gazing at Fate and the relentless ocean, is 
perhaps his masterpiece — yet it measures only three inches by two 
and one-half inches. "Types" and "Wrecked" are of the same vein 
and quality. Of Hansen we may say with perfect surety that the 
continuation of such work will assure him his place among the great 
etchers of our age. The Fourth Printmakers' International recog- 
nizes his importance by awarding him the Los Angeles gold medal 
for the best print in their exhibition, his "Sardine Barge," a very 
fine etching, though to my mind not quite achieving the quality of 
his tiny drypoints. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF REDLANDS WATER SUPPLY * a& ™S2[ 



IN 1774 the Anza expedition consisting of 240 person left Sonora, 
Mexico, to travel by paths unknown to the San Gabriel Mission. 
As they made their way from the Colorado River by way of Yuma 
and came through the mountain ranges, there spread before them 
what we now know as the San Bernardino Valley. Except for the 
Santa Ana River threading its way westward, it must have seemed 
an absolute desert. The change to the verdure-covered gardens and 
citrus groves of today is due primarily to one thing — water. The 
development of water in this valley is a fascinating story, still to be 
written. 

In 1810 a mission settlement was made at Politano, near Bunker 
Hill, and a little later one of greater permanence at Old San Bernar- 
dino. These missions were designed as supply stations for the route 
between San Gabriel Mission and Old Mexico. 

Exactly one hundred years ago, in 1822, under the direction of the 
Mission Fathers, the Indians built the Mill Creek Zanja. This ditch 
is still as good as ever and its waters continue to irrigate the groves 
west of Redlands. In the early days, it was wont to overflow and 
flood the streets of Redlands, but now it is bridged until one would 
hardly know it is there. Its clear water and tree-lined banks have 
brought pleasure to hundreds of people, in addition to its primary 
object of irrigation. Surely we owe a lasting debt to the sturdy 
Indian laborers who dug this pioneer irrigation project through 
seven weary miles. 

The year 1812 was the year of earthquakes. At this time the hot 
springs of Urbita burst forth, causing the superstitious Indians to 
kill the fathers and destroy the mission buildings at Politano, which 
had survived the earthquake. The Old San Bernardino mission con- 
tinued to exist, its fields watered by the zanja, until 1833 when the 
California missions were secularized. 

The San Bernardino Rancho came into possession of the Lugo fam- 
ily and from them it was purchased by the Mormon settlers in 1851. 
The population increased but slowly and their habits were simple so 
that there was little necessity for water development. However, they 
at once utilized the old zanja for watering a vineyard in Old San 
Bernardino which they held as common property. On Lytle Creek 
they had 50 acres laid out in one-acre tracts and irrigated by open 
ditches. 

After the departure of the Mormons, the settlers continued to use 
what ditches there were and gradually others were added, such as the 
Timber Ditch near the head of the Santa Ana on the south side and 
the Cram-VanLeuven and Berry Roberts ditches. During this period 
the waters of City Creek were taken to the bench lands of Highland 
and water from the Santa Ana was taken in the Highland ditch to 
the East Highland ditch to the East Highland Mesa. Land and 
water companies were formed, the Redlands Water Co. being started 
in 1881. These and other comparatively simple beginnings bring us 
to the more ambitious project of the Bear Valley dam. 

Bear Valley, associated with romance and the gold fever, is still 
(Continued ov page 24) 




"WITH THEIR FEET IN THE WATER. THEIR HEADS IN THE SUN," AC- 
CORDING TO ARABIAN AGRICULTURIST'S DIRECTIONS FOR GROWING 
PALMS, THE NATIVE PALMS OF CALIFORNIA FLOURISH IN ROCK-BOUND 
PALM CANYON A NATIONAL MONUMENT. PHOTO BY ALCYON ROBINSON. 



14 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 




Makers of Homes 

EDNAH ROBINSON AIKEN has written a great book in 
"The Hinges of Custom" (Dodd, Mead and Co.). As a 
work of art it would doubtless have been greater if the back- 
ground had been subdued and the grand line in fiction em- 
phasized by a sweeping portrayal of the two main char- 
acters, carried through the book on the swift current of the 
author's thought. 

But it is the background of present world unrest that is 
really the important matter. The age-old relations of hus- 
band and wife, employer and workman, lord and vassal are 
loosening, leaving the atoms of civilization's progress free 
to take up new positions in the great electrified solution of 
human thought and ideals. It is as a picture of our time 
in its restless search for the right way out of slavery, that 
this book is worthy of the place it has made for itself in 
fiction of the day. 

Character after character is passed in review before us, 
circumstance after circumstance emphasizes the fact that 
everybody is restless under bonds that are man-made and 
selfish. 

Hints, to be sure, are given in this hurried treatise, of 
what marriage is for. Memories of what a home his 
mother made for him and visions of w^hat his own might 
be with the right woman come frequently from the chief 
character in the story. And these hints, put into a man's 
mouth by a California woman writer, exemplify ideals of 
a comradship between man and wife that is peculiarly 
Californian. 

Tradition and custom have less weight w r ith the descend- 
ants of men who cut themselves loose from all that when 
they trekked across a continent eighty years ago. Out of 
that exodus California has learned to judge a man by 
character rather than by stock and yet expect to find char- 
acter in stock. Freedom of the new west also makes for 
freedom in marriage. Not free love as reported from 
Russia, but freedom from the old idea of ownership of one 
human being by another. 

Out of the welter and talk and discussion women them- 
selves are solving the problem, teaching their sons to look 
womenkind in the face as equals, and bringing up their 
daughters to be independent individually but in the com- 
munity life, makers of homes. 

The Pasadena Plans 

ONE who knew the town of Pasadena in the early '90s 
has compared its present appearance to that of a 
beautiful woman, well groomed and daintily gowned, yet 
undeveloped by any deep intellectual emotion. That this 
development is now in process of attainment is evident to 
those who are interested in the plans now shown at the city 
hall — the result of a year's work by the Chicago firm of 
Bennett and Parsons. 

Beautiful women are prevalent in California. The cli- 
mate produces them and they come well groomed from 
Chicago. Beautiful, well-cared-for towns dot the landscape 
of the southland of the Pacific. When "Southern Califor- 
nia" was a separate entity it was purely a show place, clean- 
ing its streets and polishing its door knobs to receive its 
guests, the tourists. The same rules which made Pasa- 
dena famous, the same procedure and propaganda which 
filled her hotels and boarding houses and made every citizen 
a realtor, have now been copied by every town of size in 
the San Gabriel Valley ; and, dropped down blindfolded into 
the center of any town on the boulevards, one who knows 
them all superficially could not tell his whereabouts — for 
they all look alike, in their first stages of development. 

To preserve its identity, therefore, and to make itself a 
crystallized, centralized city, distinctly not a part of a great 
amorphous settlement, Pasadena has set herself the task 
of leading again in civic betterment and has begun to evolve 
a city plan which cannot be imitated because it is Pasadena 
herself, grown up into a gracious individuality through the 
building of a civic center which "fits her like a glove." 



Santa Barbara Gives One-Act Plays 

SEVERAL years ago a young man wrote some one-act 
plays which were so good that they were immediately 
and consistently refused by the "commercial" managers 
and producers of Broadway. This in itself was high recom- 
mendation for any piece of work accomplished and was a 
distinct step forward. Having had his work refused, the 
young man offered the plays to a little theater, struggling 
manfully to produce plays among the lobster-pots and nets 
of a New England wharf-house. The plays were taken, 
produced and in theatrical parlance "knocked 'em off their 
seats." The young man was one Eugene O'Neill and the 
little-theater group was the Provincetown Players. 

The production of these first sea stories by O'Neill, in a 
storage house for fish nets, crates and tackle, on a dock in 
Provincetown, with the salt tang blowing in through the 
cracks and the breakers smashing just beneath the crude 
stage, marked the beginning of the rise of the theatrical 
short-story. The roar of the salty winds outside the Prov- 
incetown fish house and the beating of the waves below 
were symbolic of the storm which was soon to break around 
the managerial reefs of Times Square, roll in a surging tide 
up Broadway to about opposite the Winter Garden and 
burst in a relentless flood all over the country. 

For, in spite of all maledictions, deep-throated cursings 
and sundry other expressions of ill-will against the "com- 
mercial" managers, these managers, up to the present, 
catering to tastes and intelligences of twelve-year old chil- 
dren, knew what was good for them and consequently the 
one-act play, not a curtain raiser any more but a legitimate 
production, began to receive attention. 

And now, here in California, in Santa Barbara, three of 
the great one-act plays, that form of dramatic writing 
which Americans do better than anything else, are being 
presented — "Be," bv Eugene O'Neill; "Aria da Capo," by 
Edna St. Vincent Millay, and "Big Kate," by Charles Fred- 
erick Nirdlinger. 

An interesting point of the play "He," is that Nina Moise, 
who directed its first production in New York, by the Prov- 
incetown Players, is directing the Santa Barbara presenta- 
tion and Ira Remsen, who played in the piece is now tech- 
nical director of the Moise production. 

In "Aria da Capo," carnival atmosphere, confetti, pink 
ribbons and lavender Pierrots embellish, or at least sur- 
round, one of the greatest one-act plays ever written. A 
tragedy of fighting nations, a biting satire on the whim- 
sical couple, The World and His Wife, are served up on a 
bon-bon dish, flanked by macaroons and sparkling wine (Mr. 
Volstead to the contrary). Gordon Mendelssohn, an actor 
of long experience, once playing with Richard Mansfield in 
the American production of "Peer Gynt," with Ben Greet 
and in the chronic success, "Peg of My Heart," has jour- 
neyed to Santa Barbara to help produce this magnificent 
bit of irony and to take the part of Pierrot. Young Men- 
delssohn, for he is young and rich in modern thoughts, 
played the part in a Detroit production of the piece and 
returned to the stage after a long retirement to do it, drawn 
back because of the very worth and the immensity of it. 

"Big Kate" they say is also delightful but I do not know 
it, except from a reading. That much, however, was delight- 
ful and it is by the man who wrote "Madame Pompadour" 
for Julia Marlowe, "First Lady of the Land" for Elsie Fer- 
guson and "The World and His Wife" for Faversham. 

Anyway, here is the one-act play, come to Santa Barbara 
and to California, in its best form. It started in New Eng- 
land and has reached the Pacific coast. It is no frantic 
attempt to advertise if we say that the little plays, beau- 
tifully written, strong and vivid as a flash of light that 
strikes the eyes and is gone, will be superlatively staged. 
The Community Arts Players do things that way. And 
may the refreshing salt breeze that blew success to O'Neill 
and aired out the managerial offices of Broadway waft suc- 
cess to the players and their good work for giving us good 
plays on the Pacific shore. Edward Sajous, 

Of the Santa Barbara Community Arts Association. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



15 



OPINION 



Memorial Day 

WITH all that it means to nations, communities, individ- 
uals, Memorial Day bids us pause in our daily work 
and sum up the world's gain while our own hearts are 
bowed in misery. 

Simplified to its elemental bareness, 
the war which the present generation 
has just gone through revolves it- 
self into this historic fact: Through- 
out past ages civilization, perfecting 
its armor and appliances for war, 
had mastered the brute force of sav- 
age races and had reacted to the point 
where brute force epitomized in a sin- 
gle nation had gathered unto its 
bosom all those perfected instru- 
ments of war and turned them on 
the rest of the world. Realizing 
slowly what had happened, allied civ- 
ilization rose to the terrible task of 
defense against brute force armed to 
the teeth with modern appliances ; 
and at the sacrifice of the flower of 
its youth, the joy of life, and all that 
goes to make for tolerance of na- 
tionalism, civilization fought for ex- 
istence, dethroned all warlike leaders 
and stripped brute force of its dis- 
guise and chained it. 

Exhausted by the struggle and 
wearily gathering together the brok- 
en strands of faith, the tired world 
sets aside a day to thank in deep 
gratitude those who, living or dead, 
gave themselves to the defense of all 
that is worth while in this age. 

Those who went to war with the 
hope in their hearts that this great 
struggle might end all war are dis- 
appointed because nothing is being 
done by our country to consummate 
our promises. In no better way can 
we celebrate Memorial Day than to 
move as a nation toward this con- 
summation of a League for Peace. 

The fact that this last war was 
the largest and most terrible of all 
wars does not prove that warlike 
qualities are commendable. Rather 
is the making of war now considered 
a disgrace — no longer to be boasted 
of as the Roman conquerer boasted, 
or as the savage counted the scalps 
at his belt. 

Fortified and encouraged by this 
thought of actual gain in race right- 
eousness, we may capitalize our 
moral progress by giving it the 
stamp of authority. Institutions — 
the standardizing of ideals — are the 
mileposts of democratic progress. 
Leaders may be able to stand alone 
and be able to be firm in their con- 
victions ; but a whole people or a civ- 
ilization must erect a monument to 

its declaration of principles. Such a monument the world 
is now erecting. Slowly, with infinite pains and multi- 
tudious contributions, the thought of the world is crystal- 
lizing into a compact between the nations of the world 
whereby they will pledge themselves not to strike at each 
other when they disagree, but so to organize internation- 
ally that the machinery of international law may function 
throughout the earth and nationals dwell together in unity 
as they do in the United States of America. 




WAR MEMORIAL, BERT W 
"DID WE FIGHT TO END 



Into the fire beneath the "melting pot of nations" has 
been thrown race prejudice and hatred. Tried in this 
intense heat national characteristics disappear in vapor 
or shine forth as pure gold. 

The House of the Veterans 

'"PHE present effort of the Pasadena 
Post of the American Legion to 
secure a club house and memorial 
building is highly idealistic and 
should receive the cordial support of 
all public spirited citizens. 

The American Legion has secured 
subscriptions from its own member- 
ship for over $40,000 and with this 
money has purchased a lot on North 
Marengo Avenue- — opposite the Y. M. 
C. A. This lot will face the avenue 
leading to the new Civic Center. It 
is now proposed to erect a beautiful 
building on this lot at a cost of from 
$100,000 to $150,000 which shall com- 
bine the features of a memorial build- 
ing and a club house for all ex-service 
men. The public is asked to provide 
the building and the Legion will give 
the lot to be held in trust during the 
life of the American Legion. Upon 
the death of this organization the 
property will revert to the city for 
patriotic uses. This project should 
commend itself to the citizens of Pas- 
adena fro mevery point of view. 

First, from the artistic point of 
view — This building will be a distinct 
asset to the architectural beauty of 
the City. It will have a dignified 
monumental front of Class A con- 
struction facing the future Civic 
Center. Another striking feature of 
the building will be the patriotic 
foyer which will be the main entrance 
to the building. Opening off of this 
will be rooms for the G. A. R. and 
Spanish American War Veterans. The 
rest of the building will be devoted 
to the uses of the American Legion. 

Second, from the standpoint of 
sentiment — A city or nation that 
fails to honor its heroic dead is lack- 
ing in those qualities that make for 
national greatness. We of America 
are too much devoted to the accum- 
ulation of wealth to give thought to 
the artistic and finer things of life. 
How different are the French in this 
respect ! Already — despite their great 
poverty and political difficulties they 
have reared many beautiful monu- 
ments in commemoration of the he- 
roic deeds of their people and their 
Allies. While America has done lit- 
tle or nothing in the way of memori- 
alizing her honored dead. 
Third, from the unitarian point of view this memorial 
building would be a good investment for the City of Pasa- 
dena. The city has little to boast of in the way of public 
buildings and nothing is more needed to give character 
and dignity to the city than artistic public building. More- 
over, this building will stand as a symbol of patriotism 
and will be a center for the patriotic activities and good 
government efforts of the citizens. Every loyal and patri- 
otic citizen should subscribe to this Memorial Building. 



JOHNSON. SCULPTOR. 
WAR? THEN END IT." 



16 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



TOWN AND COUNTRY COLLEGE FUNCTIONS 

By ELLEN LEECH 




THE CHILDREN OK THE HOTEL DEL CORONADO SCHOOL DRAMATIZE 
THEIR GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY LESSONS IN A MOST DELIGHTFUL 

MANNER. 



IN TAHQU IT/. CANYON WITH CHARACTERS OF THE DESERT PLAY TO HE 
GIVEN IN THE HAUNTS OF THE REDMEN OF CALIFORNIA 



"When the pepper-tree trails her lace in the 
dust 

And the roses rest; 

When at dawn and at dusk the frogs whir in 
tune 

And the rain-gods jest: 
It is June, white June!" 

AND June is more or less dedicated to the 
youth of the land. Whether it marks the 
end of the course for the dignified college 
graduate, in cap and gown, or that portentous 
first week of vacation to the prancing young- 
ster and his kiddie car, it is a momentous 
month to those within the school age, and one 
eagerly anticipated throughout the year. No 
matter how pleasant the school days may have 
been, the new paths are always alluring and 
hold small trace of the lurking drama around 
the corner. And even if the presence was sus- 
pected drama presents no terrors to the pres- 
ent day student, he is well acquainted with 
her in all her phases. In fact in the dry as 
dust atmosphere of the class room the one 
flower that thrives and blooms apace, reach- 
ing fruition early in June is the Rose of 
Drama, giving her perfume and shedding her 
petals indiscriminately. 

In practically every school and college in 
the country dramatics are fostered and new 
and latent talent is being discovered. When 
the young students of a school, almost kinder- 
garteners, are taught their history and geog- 
raphy by the aid of costume and drama, it is 
not to be wondered that as a State we produce 
dramatists and actors of drama; it is the nat- 
ural sequence. 

It is not surprising then when the various 



Departments of Dramatics are called upon to 
produce talent commensurate with the produc- 
tion of the highest type of drama, they never 
fail to satisfy the demand. 





A DETAIL OF THE ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENT 
IN THE GREEK DRAMA. "AGAMEMNON." 



At one period in the history of the country 
pamphlets were issued with short and rather 
inane plays suitable for production by schools 
and adapted for college classes, but now we 
attempt and achieve the highest type of drama 
and it is always done extraordinarily well. 
Everything attempted is not only well done 
histrionically, but the stage settings, the cos- 
tuming and the lighting effects compare favor- 
ably with any of the legitimate stage produc- 
tions. 

A case in point was the staging of "The 
Agamemnon of Aeschylus" by the Greek 
Drama Class of the University of California 
at Los Angeles last month. The sets were de- 
signed by the architectural department, the 
costumes were made by the members of the 
Greek class and home economics, with a view 
to producing the most harmonious color ef- 
fects, and the lighting arrangements designed 
by students, also members of the architectural 
department, completed the perfect ensemble. 
The play was directed by Miss Evelyn Thomas, 
was the sixth annual Greek drama she has 
produced, and was in every sense a charming 
production, not only because of the well de- 
signed setting but because of the remarkably 
well sustained Greek atmosphere. 

The California Institute of Technology at 
Pasadena is so well and so favorably known as 
an institution of the most erudite learning 
that we are prepared for an intense tragedy 
when they announce a play and are delighted 
beyond measure when we find they are provid- 
ing musical comedy. When a college strictly 
masculine in attendance can give a fantasy so 
frothing with femininity, we are convinced 
engineers and scientists have a softer side 
than we suspected. 




THE CAST OF "THE YELLOW JACKET." PRESENTED BY POMONA COL- 
LEGE MASQUERS SOCIETY. DURING THE SPRING SEMESTER. 



THE WATER SPRITES IN ONE OF THE EXQUISITE GROUP DANCES OF 
THE MAY MASQUE AT POMONA COLLEGE, CLAREMONT. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



17 



"The Atomizer" proved the contention of 
the President of the Student Body that the 
men could not only build bridges but bridge 
the chasm between the hard facts on which 
they thrive and the lighter, more artistic side 
of life. William L. Stanton is the author and 
director of the comedy, the music for which 
was written by Lawrence Cook of Occidental 
College, and the orchestration done by Mrs. 
Estell Minckler of Pasadena. 

A resume of the dramatic work at Pomona 
College gives a good indication of the general 
accomplishment throughout the year at a 
modern college. Under the Department of 
Dramatics three plays were given during the 
past year which show the extent of the train- 
ing and the ambition of the students. "The 
Famous Mrs. Fair," "Othello," — this Shake- 
spearean play given as a number of the music 
and lecture course of the college — and "The 
Man from Judah," a religious dramatization 
of the Book of Amos, given under the joint 
auspices of the Dramatic Department and the 
Department of Religious Education. 

Beside the Department of Dramatics, there 
are Class productions and Masquer produc- 
tions, as the Pomona College Masquers Society 
is an organization for the development of the 
dramatic talent of students. This organiza- 
tion presented "The Yellow Jacket" during the 
winter, and the class of 1924 presented "Mr. 




THE EXQUISITE WORK OF THE CHORUS IN UNFOLDING THE TRAGIC STORY OF AGAMEMNON 

TURNED TRAGEDY INTO BEAUTY. 



The Senior Class play is usually original 
with the students but this year is a departure 




THE IMPRESSIVE ACADEMIC PROCESSION WINDING ITS LENGTH INTO THE OPEN AIR THEATRE 

AT POMONA COLLEGE, CLAREMONT. 

Pirn Passes By." The Masquers Society also 
presents a vaudeville show, directed by Harold 
Harvey, a student in the college, which in- 
cludes clever skits and pantomine. 





from the general custom, and they will use 
Justin McCarthy's "If I Were King." This 
makes an ideal presentation for the Greek 
theatre as it is filled with romance and affords 
opportunity for suggestive rather than realis- 
tic stage setting. The director, Houseton 
Peterson, a former Pomona student, plans to 
stage two acts in the "pit," which is a new 
venture. 

A particularly unique feature in connection 
with Claremont is that there is no commercial 
movie house in the city and the movies are 
entirely controlled by Pomona College under 
the direction of Dr. R. D. Williams. The 
highest grade productions are put on in 
Holmes Hall every Tuesday and Wednesday 
evening with a mere nominal admission fee of 
15 cents. In connection with this one-act plays 
are occasionally presented. These plays are 
of two types — those written by the students 
under the direction of the Department of 
Dramatics, and others selected as try-outs for 
students who are candidates for the Masquers 
Society. These are prepared and put on with 
absolutely no expense whatever to the parti- 
cipants, the expense being covered by the 
funds received from the movie productions. 
This gives opportunity for the development 
of the student dramatic talent of the institu- 
tion and is perhaps a feature that is not found 
in connection with any other college in this 
section of the country. 

The value of college training in dramatics 
was amply proved by the recent successful 
presentation of "The Follies of Pasadena" by 
the Community Players, as the majority of 
this community organization are graduates of 
the local colleges and high schools. 



DEAR LITTLE "DOROTHY" OF THE DIMPLE, 
ACCORDING TO MUSICAL COMEDY, BUT THE 
HUSKY H. C. SHEFFIELD IN COLLEGE PARLANCE. 



"MISS EVA," THE CHARMING CHAPERONE OF 
"THE ATOMIZER" IN EVERYDAY LIFE. "DICK" 
OF THE TEARING, RARING, ROARING MOTOR 
BIKE, AND OFFICIALLY RICHARD SEARES, 
SON OF MR. AND MRS. FREDERICK H. SEARES 
OF THE MT. WILSON OBSERVATORY, 




THE SLIGHTLY SERIOUS BUT NONE THE LESS 
DANGEROUS SIREN OF "MISS EVA'S" CLASS, 
KNOWN TO CAL-TECH AS HOWARD TACKABURY. 



13 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



THE ARCHITECTURAL CLUB OF LOS ANGELES 



OFFICERS 

Clifford A. Truesdell, Jr., President 
Lloyd Rally, Vice-President 
Paul W. Penland, Secretary 
Roscoe E. Bowles, Treasurer 



illllllllipilllllIIB 

THE DISABLED VETERANS 
Studying architecture at the Southern 
Branch University of California are some sev- 
enty veterans, disabled in the late war. These 
men are fighting their way back to health and 
are striving at the same time to fit themselves 
to fight life's battle — to compete as draughts- 
men and architects with the rest of us. Piti- 
fully handicapped as most of these Govern- 
ment trainees are, it is obvious that the 
broadest and most comprehensive training that 
can possibly be obtained for them, is none too 
much. 

Unfortunately, these veterans are being 
trained under the auspices of the United States 
Veterans Board— a great, top-heavy, utterly 
soulless political machine, reeking with inef- 
ficiency and autocratic bureaucracy, and over- 
flowing from top to bottom with a magnificent 
array of little men. An order for economy has 
apparently been sent out from Washington. 
The local' bureau, which we are told numbers 
in excess of five hundred employees to care for 
the local 3500 trainees, and which occupies the 
entire luxuriously furnished second floor of 
the Pacific Mutual Building, decided that the 
best road to economy would be to cut down 
the training period of the veterans. And so a 
so-called course in architecture — one of which 
was for a "designing draftsman" and allowed 
but one and a half years of University train- 
ing, without either free hand drawing or de- 
sign — was "composed" by the Veterans Bureau, 
and forwarded to the University with the 
statement that "it should be given every con- 
sideration, looking toward its adoption at your 
school." An accompanying letter stated that 
these courses had been approved by several 
local architects, who, upon being interviewed, 
stated that they had been entirely misquoted. 
Later, the courses of study proposed by the 
Veterans Bureau, and also a comprehensive ex- 
hibit of the work of the Veterans, were sub- 
mitted to about twenty local architects, in- 
cluding David Allison, Kenneth Carpenter, H. 
C. Chambers, Styles Clements, Walter and 
Pierpont Davis, Donald Parkinson, Lloyd 
Rally, Sumner Spaulding, Jess Stanton, Paul 
Williams, Carlton Monroe Winslow and A. C. 
Zimmerman, practically all of whom wrote let- 
ters to Dr. E. C. Moore condemning the Veter- 
ans Bureau course as hopelessly inadequate 
and commending the course now in force. Dr. 
Moore answered these letters, stating that the 
University was under contract with the Vet- 
erans Bureau to give instruction as the latter 
dictated. The disabled Veterans were then 
forced to carry their own case to the regents 
of the University. They are carrying it to 
every civic organization in Southern Califor- 
nia, to senators and congressmen, and to the 
White House, — and they will of course win. 

The pity of it all is that the disabled Vet- 
erans must keep on fighting — not just for 
health, but for the right to be properly rehab- 
ilitated, which the people of the United 
States, through Congress, have granted them. 
The Veterans Bureau is apparently quite sat- 
isfied if it places the Veterans in any pos'tion 
where they can earn an "existence wage"; it 
cannot be concerned with sufficiently equipping 
these unfortunate heroes so that they can 
climb after their training period has come to 
an end. 

Our interest as a club is not simply that, 
we want to avoid being burdened professional- 
ly with half-trained disappointed men. The 
recent war is not so far away from most of 
us that we can forget what the majority of 
these Veterans have gone through. Are we 
going to help them fight this battle — or bet- 
ter still, shouldn't we fight it for them? 
THE CLUB LIBRARY 

Abraham Lincoln said "I will study and 
some day my chance may come". We have a 
lot of little Abrahams in our club, who would 
like to study Design at the Architectural Club 
Atelier. 



MONTHLY BULLETIN 




Office of the Club, SIS Santce Street 



Now eighty years ago books didn't cost much, 
and anyway, all you needed was the bible, 
Shakespeare or Upton Sinclair. So after all, 
Mr. Lincoln's problem wasn't such a terribly 
difficult one financially. 

Our young club members should have at least 
five thousand dollars worth of books to enable 
them to properly study design. But even an 
architect will see the impracticability of such 
a solution, because all of these young students 
aren't spending their spare time working for 
Meyer and Holler. It would seem that a 
simple solution would be to establish a real 
library at the club for the common use of all 
the men studying design. 

This is our seventh monthly bulletin, and 
each month we have bowed on bended knees in 
humble supplication to our readers, the pros- 
perous architects of Southern California, and 
begged for books. We've offered nothing but 
a reward to a stricken conscience in some is- 
sues, and in others, unlimited publicity. We've 
consulted oracles, soothsayers, engineers and 
building companies — yet we are still quite 
bookless. Some people had the temerity to tell 
us why they couldn't give us books: — our 
door didn't have a good lock on it, we weren't 
insured, didn't have a librarian, etc., etc. So 
we did everything — locked the doors, hired a 
librarian, and even accomplished the etc., etc. 
We called the bluff of the book givers, but re- 
ceived practically no books, other than those 
that we ourselves gave to ourselves. 

There could of course be no conclusion to 
this particular article. 

WEEKLY EXECUTIVE MEETINGS 

Directors and members of the Executive 
Committee are reminded that executive ses- 
sions are held in the office of the President in 
the San Fernando Building every Monday at 
5:15. The officers of the club are extremely 
faithful about attending these meetings, at 
practically every one of which important de- 
tails of club management and policy are dis- 
cussed. The counsel of the directors and the 
majority of the members of the Executive 
Committee would no doubt be of great assist- 
ance. We can't say this with any degree of 
certainty, because we've only once had the 
pleasure of receiving any of it. However, 
we're willing to give it a try-out. 

THE ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE 

As a club, we should indeed be grateful to 
Mr. Julian Garnsey for the excellent speakers 
that have addressed most of our meetings, and 
to Mr. Lloyd Rally for our interesting Satur- 
day afternoon trips. Dr. Verne Knudson, who 
addressed the May meeting on "Acoustics" 
gave one of the most interesting talks of the 
year. He proved, much to the surprise of 
those present, that the majority of the build- 
ings that are acoustical failures could have 
been saved with about fifteen minutes spent on 
a comparatively simple formula. Mr. Gordon 
Whitnall gave an extremely interesting discus- 
sion on our civic center problem. 

We have been extremely fortunate in hav- 
ing the active co-operation of our older mem- 
bers in the business of making the meetings 
successful. Messrs. David Allison, A. B. Ben- 
ton, Harwood Hewitt, Sumner Hunt, Myron 
Hunt, Sylvanus Marston, Carlton Winslow and 
Wm. Woollett have addressed us during the 
past year. Mr. Reginald Johnson is to speak 



DIRECTORS 

William Lee Woollett 
Donald Wilkinson 
Walter S. Davis 



. i. 'u -::i..Hi i .i.i i. .'ii. i: ■. . i i. .: ui'ji n . . i : ; i k : u- : l ; i . . 1 ( ! ■ 1 H 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■. 1 1 i 1 ■ I ■ ! i ■ ! H Li is i l ! L I : iiu^ni.iiHi .hi. 

at the June meeting on "Psychology in the 
Lraughting Room". Messrs. Edwin Bergstrom 
and Garrett Van Pelt, Jr., have been asked to 
address the Summer meetings. 

ASSESSMENTS AND DUES 

Notices regarding the assessment of a dol- 
lar and a half should by this time be in the 
hand of all club members. This tax, discussed 
in the March meeting and voted upon at the 
April meeting ,is to cover the cost of furnish- 
ing the club quarters. Several hundred dol- 
lars worth of furniture, lighting fixtures and 
chairs for the meetings, and general equip- 
ment, were ordered early last Summer. For 
the greater part these items have been paid 
for, but the business of borrowing cash for 
such expenditures from current funds, has 
left but little cash on hand. 

Members are urged to be more prompt about 
paying dues. Nearly twenty members are now 
in arrears, and have not only received their 
final notice from the Treasurer, but a personal 
letter from the President. With the new mem- 
bers brought in at the last two meetings, the 
membership will probably exceed four hun- 
dred. We should soon be in a position to buy 
books for our club library from our club 
funds, which added to those the local archi- 
tects are giving, should constitute a big stride 
forward for the club. 

A MODELING SCHOOL 

Mr. Humberto Pedretti, who assisted Mr. 
Wm. Lee Wollett in the sculptural interpreta- 
tions at the new Graumans theater, has 
opened a school in architectural modeling and 
the making of architectural models, at 1711 
Cahuenga Ave. Mr. Pedretti is himself an 
architect as well as a sculptor, but is devoting 
all of his time to the latter art. He practiced 
in Europe and in Mexico many years before 
coming to Los Angeles, and is a welcome new- 
comer to the local art colony. As a fellow- 
member of our club, we wish him great suc- 
cess in his new adventure, and many of us will 
doubtless become his pupils. 

EMPLOYMENT REGISTRY 

As a result of our advertisements in eastern 
magazines, Mr. Henry Davis, Chairman of the 
Employment Committee, has letters from at 
least twenty eastern men requesting positions 
in Los Angeles, some of whom have had years 
of experience in the best eastern offices. These 
letters are available to all members who desire 
to see them. All have been notified that it will 
be absolutely necessary for them to come to 
Los Angeles before being hired, as the local 
architects will not employ a man without first 
having talked with him. Mr. Davis has prac- 
tically a dozen requests for $75.00 a week 
men, with a promise of more if men prove 
their worth, and could place anv number of 
men at $50.00 and $(!0.00. There are few offices 
in Los Angeles at the present time which are 
not seeking draughtsmen. 

COMPETITION 

The Security Housing Corporation competi- 
tion for a $4500.00 house, held under the aus- 
pices of the Architectural Club of Los Angeles, 
was entered by about fifty-two members of the 
club, and was in every sense a successful com- 
petition. A jury appointed by the Southern 
California Chapter American institute of Ar- 
chitects and consisting of Messrs. David Alii 
son, Pierpont Davis and Frank J. Hudson, 
made the following awards: Messrs. Alfred 
Clarke, C. W. Lemmon and R. D. McPherson, 
all of Myron Hunt's office, received first, sec- 
ond and third prizes in the order named. Mr. 
Louis Korn, of Mr. Rosenheim's office, re- 
ceived fourth prize. These prizes were for 
$150.00, $75.00, $50.00 and $35.00 respectively. 
Messrs. Joe Estep, 1201 Van Nuys Building, 
and Rodney McClelland, student at the South- 
ern Branch University of California, were 
awarded honorable mentions. Several of the 
other drawings are to be retained by the Se- 
curity Housing Corporation, which will pay 
$25.00 to the respective entrants. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



19 



THE SMALL HOUSE SERVICE MONTHLY PLAN NO. 4 




1) F, T A 1 L 



HOUSt AlAY BF, BUILT 
p K t I/A S T E,IL ON MA S - 
O.NS.Y OR. HUSTIC SID- 
1>T G OAI WOO STUDS. 
WOi|) .SHIIKiLrE,D ROT) F 
STAINtD WAFM BROWH 



Ol 



COMPETITION 
A $ 5O0O HOUSE 



SUBMITTED B Y 
"C (LOSS DU F T" 

G 1LA F HIC SCALE 

I) F.TA11 
E J.FAATIOX S 



THE SMALL HOUSE PROBLEM 
A new solution for the Small House problem 
has been favorably passed upon by the Club 
Executive and Small House Committees and is 
now undergoing the process of organization 
and development. A small house plan shop 
has been opened at the Metropolitan Building 
Exhibit as a private enterprise by Mr. 
Theadore A. Koetzli, who has solicited at the 
suggestion of Miss Louise Schmidt of the ex- 
hibit, the co-operation of our club. Mr. Koetzli 
has agreed to sell only such plans for small 



houses as are passed upon by the Small House 
Committee of the club, and to sell only plans 
for houses costing not in excess of seven thous- 
and dollars. He is to sell these plans for sixty 
dollars, retaining ten dollars as his fee. The 
cost of drafting, blueprinting and specifica- 
tions is to be borne by the designer of each 
particular set of plans, who shall keep his 
own tracings, turning blueprints in sets of four 
over to Mr. Koetzli, accepting his recipt for 
same until such time as the sale is accom- 
plished. The profit to the designer obviously 



comes from the re-sales of his 
particular plan. The plans may 
or may not bear the architect's 
signature. If alterations are re- 
quested by prospective buyers, 
they will be required to pay a ten 
dollar deposit with Mr. Koetzli 
and will then be referred to the 
original designer, with whom they 
may make any arrangements the 
designer cares to make. It is the 
policy of the plan shop, however, 
to discourage the buyer from al- 
tering plans. 

The Homecraft Magazine, 
which is sent gratis to all buyers 
of residence lots in Southern 
California and to everyone who 
takes out a building permit for 
a residence, will publish gratis 
from four to eight sketches each 
month of houses, the plans for 
which are on sale at the shop. 
Arrangements are now being 
made to secure similar publicity 
from other magazines. 

This scheme gives the club 
membership an opportunity to 
share in an idealistic scheme, in 
that the balance of power, by 
special arrangement with Miss 
Schmidt and Mr. Koetzli, will re- 
main in the club. And yet the 
scheme seems entirely practical, 
depending for its success on- the 
co-operation the club members 
will give it. If even half the 
members will get out a sketch 
for a small house, submit it to 
the Small House Committee for 
approval or criticism, and like- 
wise submit plans and specifica- 
tions, this scheme will not peter 
out as did our first small house 
adventure. If all the club mem- 
bers will get behind the scheme, 
it cannot but be a howling suc- 
cess — idealistically and financial- 
ly. Think it over. 

New Members 

The club takes great pleasure 
in announcing the following new 
members, voted in at the May 
meeting: Charles H. Cheney, 
Clyde Browne, Arthur C. Weath- 
erhead, William L. Campbell, 
Richard Barba, Chas. R. Johnson, 
Alexander L. Taranin^ Chester A. 
Williams, Franque Kuchler, Wil- 
lard White, Donald Leroy Bar- 
tels, Harry J. Muck, A. R. Brand- 
ner, James P. Erskine, William 
Lundeberg, Francis E. Morehead, 
Frank Van Rehder, William K. 
Webb, Theodore L. Pletsch, Paul 
E. T. Silvius, Charles E. Samdell, 
Lowell W. Pidgeon, Vincent Pal- 
mer, Lawrence A. Mushall, M. L. 
Lemon, Claude F. Norris, Char- 
les E. Smith, Joseph M. Savage, 
Lionel C. Banks, George C. An- 
derson, Stanley M. Cundiff, John 
B. Webb. 

The following applications have 
been reported on favorably by 
Mr. H. C. Chambers, Membership 
Committee Chairman, and will be 
voted upon at the June meeting: 
Henry Martyn Patterson, Archi- 
tect; Wm. H. Kramer, Architect 
and Engineer; Soule, Murphy & 
Hastings, Santa Barbara, Archi- 
tects; Herbert Arthur Linthwaite, Architect; 
Bert McDonald, Architect and Structural En- 
gineer; Carl R. West, Architectural Drafts- 
man; W. J. Dodd, Architect; Leslie Harold 
Drum, Student at University of California, 
Southern Branch; B. H. Horton, Architect; 
Gordon Kauffman, Architect; Arthur Kelly, 
Architect; Garrett Van Pelt, Architect; Ralph 
O. Beattie, Architect; Frank S. Vigers, Drafts- 
man; F. S. Stanton, Draftsman; Otto Neher, 
Architect; Kenneth Saunders, Draftsman. 



I N T R K N C E 



20 CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

SCIENCE FOR THE LAYMAN'S NOTE BOOK 



The work of pure science is difficult to put 
into the language of the layman, especially in 
an age whose young people pride themselves 
on the simplicity of their vocabulary. Pure 
science has its own speech, precise and elab- 
orate. That which relates to electricity and 
its application the layman has learned; but 
pure science covers the investigations which 
have not yet been worked out, or applied to 
practical use. Without research work along 
entirely new lines there would be no progress 
in human affairs. The scientific man, there- 
fore, should be left alone to work out these 
important problems in his own way; and life 
being invariably too short for what he sees 
ahead of him, he cannot be expected to trans- 
late his problems into the language of those 
who are of no help in the matter. 

Astronomers all over the world speak the 
same language and their communications, one 
with another, look like hieroglyphics to the 
ordinary person. Made up mostly of equa- 
tions and tables of figures and Greek letters 
the Contributions from the Mount Wilson 
Observatory are, nevertheless, welcomed all 
over the world by other astronomers and read 
with as great gusto as would be a letter from 
a dear and long lost friend. 

Take, for instance, the following sentence, 
selected from the first page at which one of 
these pamphlets, No. 220, by Gustaf Strom- 
berg, happened to open: "The determination 
of the mean absolute magnitudes based on 
parallactic motion would make these stars 
considerably brighter than the results from 
the trigonometric parallaxes indicate. A 
weighted mean was accordingly used. The 
discordance is now nearly eliminated by the 
application of the systematic corrections to 
the trigonometric parallaxes." Those are 
English words and we know the meaning of 
some of them, but the sentence does not con- 
vey any idea to the minds of most of us. It 
was not intended to do so. The writer was 



not writing for the newspapers. He was ex- 
plaining to his confreres just how accurate 
he had been able to make certain of his con- 
clusions. That is the great basic effort of the 
work done at an astronomical observatory — 
to be accurate. Time and thought are concen- 
trated upon it. Work is done over and over 
again, patiently, uncomplainingly, day after 
day, year after year, that the great distances, 
the tiniest wave length or the molecules of 
the film upon the photographic plate may all 
be measured and given proper consideration 
in the problems of which they are the known 
or the unknown quantities. It is thus and 
thus only that science has been enabled to indi- 
cate new inventions; and, leaving the prac- 
tical application to others, has gone on mak- 
ing possible accurate knowledge upon which 
all progress is based. 



ORTHODONTIA, STRAIGHT TEETHING 
If one traces to an original source any 
phase of scientific work, he will find there 
one or two earnest workers who have devoted 
hours of contemplation, deep study, and ener- 
getic research experiment to that particular 
portion of science which holds their attention 
and love. No other way has yet been found 
to add to human knowledge of life in its 
highest form. The moment in which an in- 
dividual or a race gives up and stops striv- 
ing toward "the mark of its high calling," 
that moment retrogression begins. Life is a 
forward movement and leaders must work 
hard to pull the stolid, convention-ridden mass 
of the race toward the goal. For, improve- 
ment in general conditions of living comes 
only when leaders, consecrating their lives 
to work out better ways of living, turn again 
from their work to apply those results to the 
life of the body politic. At this point inertia 
and ignorance are to be overcome and this 
is the task which has slain the prophets and 
called forth the crucifixion of those who have 



given their lives generously for humanity. 

In the freedom of the far west, where con- 
vention and tradition are more or less ignored, 
the intelligence of the American people has 
opportunity to select the good and discard the 
bad. Yet what a fund of intelligence is neces- 
sary! Here are doctors for instance. In order 
to serve the populace they must standardize 
their services and make a living; yet they 
must keep up to the times in their standards 
or the people will not trust them. And the 
times are changing fast. 

The study of electricity has revolutionized 
life; the study of the human body has in this 
age made physicians stop treating symptoms 
and humbly help nature restore health. The 
public should know that in dentistry a great 
revolution is taking place. Hitherto a stu- 
dent, taught in a few months the mechanical 
work of pulling out teeth or cleaning them 
and filling up the holes, has been able to make 
much money by thus supplying the needs of 
thousands who have never learned to care for 
their teeth. Thus dentistry has been con- 
sidered by the intelligent layman a service 
station rather than a profession. Nothing 
can be properly called a profession unless it 
is founded in hard study by the professor of 
it. Study which ultimately brings with it new 
knowledge for all of the people. This knowl- 
edge in its simplest form must then be given 
to the people and become a very fundamental 
part of their living — and so the world grows 
better. 

Orthodontia is the foundation of anything 
and everything relating to the teeth. It means 
that which makes the way straight for per- 
fect teeth. It begins with the baby and studies 
Nature's way of providing grinders of food. 
A beautiful mill is forming in every child's 
mouth. Unless it grows to perfection the child's 
whole face will be deformed and its whole 
digestive system defective and nutrition in- 
adequate. 



(Continued from page 11) 
there is much water there will be migrating 
ducks and geese to visit it and Curlew, Sand- 
Hill Cranes, Heron and Gulls. Large flocks of 
Doves come at evening to certain springs. 

Troops of Magpies and Stellar Jays are 
mentioned by desert writers. Chase calls the 
latter the "Jolly Pirates." The emphasis 



should be on the noun. One of the relatives 
destroyed five nests in one short hedge in 
Pasadena in a month. He is not particular 
whether he has eggs or young birds in his 
balanced rations. Is the fact that he is de- 
voted to his family a sufficient redeeming 
quality? It's a kind of "America-First" 
virtue. 



Many migrating birds fly over without stop, 
avoiding the battlefield where the fight is with 
famine, drought, heat and enemies. 

As the stars brighten the night bird comes 
out darting and dipping as if in play. His 
wing sweeps close, he is gone, but to return. 
He is the silent Jester when night is en- 
throned. 



From the Sands of 
the Desert and the 
Stately Palms to the 
It "i nd in g Roads and 
the Shadows of the 
Friendly Oaks of 
Flintridge // i g h - 
lands is Hut a Short 
Journey. 




CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



21 



CALIFORNIA 
HOMES AND 



PLANNING THE STUDIO 

THE life of the student of art in Paris and 
in other European cities has produced a 
mode of living quite different from that to 
which we are accustomed. In Paris the artist 
lives in the same apartment where he works. 
These apartments which are inhabited by the 
students of all countries are very small and 




GARDENING 
MANUAL 



plan which seem to be common to all of them. 
They have namely, first, a large room which 
is two stories or a story and one-half in 
height. This room being large enough to 
permit the painting of large pictures with 
the opportunity of studying them with some 
distance. The dining room and kitchen are of 
a low story and open directly from the studio. 
Above the dining room and kitchen is placed 




the living accommodations are very meagre. However, the attractive 
life of the Parisian student has appealed to many people of all 
nationalities, many of whom are financially able to live in quarters 
more commodious and attractive than the majority of apartments 
existing in the Quartier Latin. The French people, being aware of 
this demand, have devised and built great studio apartments to satisfy 
this need. They have retained the same intimate character which is 
found in the studios and apartments of the other section, and many 
of these studios are located in the fashionable district around the 
Etoile. There general attractiveness has begun to appeal not only 
to the students of art but also to people who enjoy the semi-Bohemain 
character associated so often with the life of the student. 

The plans of these studios vary, but there are some essentials in 



THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 

PRIVATE ESTATE 

''Requires the most thorough study of the 
many conditions involved. BE SURE 
you secure competent service. 



(HI 



LANDSCAPE 



. ENGINEER .\ CONTRACTOR 
PASADENA 




J. H. Woodworth 
and Son 

Designing and Building 
Telephone Fair Oaks 281 

200 E. Colorado Street 
Pasadena : California 



A- 

rTs PS 

aw ■ a~T 

|J HlUl f 





Summer Claris 



Are you planning to make your home so de- 
lightfully livable this summer that it will give 
you the full measure of rest and pleasure the 
season should bring? 

Let the splendid offerings here — of furnishings, 
draperies, household conveniences, porch and 
garden needs — help you to create a truly suc- 
cessful summer at home. 



Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes' 

BROADWAY, BETWEEN SEVENTH AND EIGHTH. 



22 



CALIFORNIA SOUTH LA \ I) 



the bathroom and bedroom. 

This studio apartment idea has spread from 
Paris to London, Rome and Vienna and across 
the ocean to New York. Many very fine studio 
apartments have been built in New York in 
the last few years. They are not only oc- 
cupied there by artists, but are also occupied 
by musicians and designers of exclusive furni- 
ture, decorators and the allied artists. Chicago 
now boasts of several of these buildings and 
they are found to be paying investments. 

Just such a building as this has been de- 
signed by the firm of Webber, Staunton & 
Spaulding, Architects, 1017 Hibernian Build- 
ing, Los Angeles, for Richardson's, Inc., a 
music house of great reputation in California. 
It is Mr. Richardson's desire to construct a 
building where musicians of note may have 
their studios and at the same time be in con- 
venient location to the public. The studios as 
designed are quite typical of the studio apart- 
ments of Paris. They have the large rooms 
which will be used as studios and the auxiliary 
rooms in two stories. The stairway leads in 
an attractive manner from the second floor 
to the bedrooms. The studios ai - e to be fin- 
ished in somewhat the style of the Italian 
Rennaissance. The ceilings are to be of wood 
with a wooden frieze around the whole room. 
With two exceptions the studios have windows 
which open to the north, giving the maximum 
amount of the proper light. There are two 
elevators running from the lower floor to the 
roof. The first floor of the building is de- 
voted entirely to the business of Richardson's, 
Inc. The general display room is across the 
front of the building. Leading from this dis- 
play room is a corridor to the back part of 
the building which is to be used for a phono- 
graph room. In the open space between these 
two departments is a large inside hall where 
special concerts or recitals may be given. This 
concert hall opens directly into the garden, or 
the open space in the court of the building. 
The court is shut off from the street by a 
colonnade. At the other end of the concert 
hall are small display rooms in which instru- 
ments of especially fine quality may be shown. 
The business administration of the organiza- 
tion is located on the mezzanine floor over 
the phonograph department. 



FRENCH and ITALIAN ARTS and CRAFTS 

Imported by 

F.LF.ANOR AND HOLUNGSWORTH BF.ACH 
Evening Bags, Old Silver, etc. Antiques 
Embroidered Linens Potteries 
630 E. Colorado Street Pasadena, Calif. 

Fair Oaks 6028 



Mabelle R. Bevans 



Elizabeth H. Baker 



THE CALIFORNIA STUDIO 

Designers of Individual Furnishings for the 
Home, Modern and Antique Furniture, 
Lamps, Shades, Fabrics, Gifts 
Consulting Decorators 
Tel. Fair Oaks 1570 
635 East Colorado Street, Pasadena, Calif. 




Pasadena Gas Appliance Co. 



Our Expert Estimators 
Can Solve Your Heating Problem 

Excluiively a Gai Appliance Store 
We Carry 

THE CLARK JEWEL GAS RANGE 

901 East Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Fair Oaks 93 




An unusual music shop where those who wish 
fine things are sure to find what they want. 



Richardson^ 

"Vidrolas telephone 649S; Pianos 
727 WEST SEVENTH. STREET 



The third Music Memory Contest held in 
Los Angeles Elementary Schools May 23d- 
May 24th, was our contribution to Music 
Week. Five months ago it was planned to in- 
crease the child's interest and enthusiasm in 
the general Appreciation course in use and to 
arouse the whole community, especially the 
parents, that they might more deeply recog- 
nize the value and importance of music. 



An Ideal School for Young Women 

Cumnock ifccfjool 

COLLEGE WORK IN THE FOLLOWING 
COURSES: 
Vocal Interpretation of Literature 
Literary Appreciation Story Telling 
Public Speaking Journalism 
Dramatics Short-Story 
Voice and Diction Dancing 
French Psychology 

Art and Art Appreciation 
An accredited High School and Junior School 
under same management 
HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
200 S. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles 

54720— Wilshire 79 



1. 

2. 
3. 

4. 
5. 

6. 



8. 
9. 
10. 



The 



LOS ANGELES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT MUSIC 

DEPARTMENT "By KATHRYN E. STONE, Supervisor of Music 

The fifth and sixth grades reviewed and 
prepared selections outlined for the fourth, 
fifth and sixth grades, while the seventh and 
eighth grades reviewed and prepared the selec- 
tions outlined for the sixth, seventh and eighth 
grades. 

Below is a partial list taken from "Music- 
Appreciation Taught by Means of the Phono- 
graph." 

Fifth and Sixth Grades 
Barcarolle (Tales of Hoffman or Love 

Tales of Hoffman) Offenbach 

From An Indian Lodge MacDowell 

Souvenir de Moscow, or The Red Sara- 
fan Wieniawski 

To a Wild Rose MacDowell 

Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes... 

Old English Folk Song 

The Marseillaise, or Airs of the Allies. 
From the Land of the Sky Blue Water 

Cad man 

Minuet Paderewski 

Salut d' Amour, or Love's Greeting. Elgar 
Dawn (William Tell Overture) .. .Rossini 
The contest was not an easy task, for the 
schools did not have equipment to do intensive 
work. Few schools owned more than one 
phonograph, and many had only a few of the 
records, but the teachers and principals put 
their shoulders to the wheel in their usual 
manner, and confronting all the many difficul- 
ties, have accomplished wonderful results. 
Throughout the city the schools are buying 
records; in some cases a few are purchased at 
a time, with the ultimate aim of buying the 
complete equipment. Thirty-five schools up- 
to-date have each purchased four 
phonographs and a set of eighty 
records, ten for each grade. The 
money to do all this has been made 
through school entertainments, 
candy sales, cake and old newspa- 
per sales. The Parent-Teacher As- 
sociations have been generous in 
their co-operation. In one instance. 
I know a committee was appointed 
by the president of the P. T. A. 
This committee visited every house 
in the neighborhood and asked for 
a dollar or one of the chosen rec- 
ords. Of course, in less than a 
week the school had the equipment 
to enter the Contest. The School 
Library also generously increased 
its record supply to help in the 



PAINTINGS of the WEST 

Stendahl Galleries 



of the Pacific Coast 



I /ocations 



(hdqrs) 

Ambassador Hotel 
Los Angeles 



Th< 



Maryland 
Pasadena 



Hotel 



Hotel del Coronado 
San Diego 

The Green Hotel 
Pasadena 



The Huntington Hotel 
Pasadena 

Hotel Vista del Arroyo 
Pasadena 



cause. 

In order to study these records, 
teachers had classes at 8:15 a. m., 
12:15 and 3 o'clock. As many 
study periods as school could af- 
ford were also given over to Music 
Appreciation. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



23 



CALIFORNIA AS A TEXTILE CENTER FOR DESIGNERS 



THE BOOK OF ROBO 

By Robaix de L'Abrie Richey 

Compiled and Published by Tina Modotti 
Richey at 313 So. Lake Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

A LITTLE book made its appearance a short 
while ago, unostensibly taking its place 
among scores of others coming from the 
presses; but, unlike the majority of them, it 
will some day be sought after by the con- 
noisseurs of unique volumes. 

The readers of "California Southland" may 
remember in the November issue for the year 
1921 an article on the exceptional batics of 
Robaix de L'Abrie Richey and his wife, Tina 
Modotti Richey, with an illustration showing 
the artists working together in their studio. 
A short time after the appearance of the 
article, the artist went to Mexico to paint 
and study the early decorative designs of the 
Mayas and Aztecs, but death, soon after, cut 
short his admirable undertaking. 

Robaix de L'Abrie Richey, or simply "Robo," 
to his circle of friends, was a rare and strange 
genius. Poet, painter, and philosopher, with 
a mind attuned to the fine subtleties of phys- 
ical and psychical phenomena and their aes- 
thetic relations, he was ever trying to analyze 
the complex order of existence and reduce it 
to a formula whereby to "live beautiful." 
His physical strength, however, was by no 
means equal to the tasks his mind directed, 
and consequently the material work which he 
left is for the most part fragmentary, though, 
like the sketches of a master draughtsman, 
each piece is complete in itself. 

The "Book of Robo" consists of a collection 
of his verses and prose writings with a bio- 
graphical sketch of the artist beautifully 
written by his wife, and an introduction by 
John Cowper Powys. It is illustrated with a 
photograph of the artist, serving as a frontis- 
piece, and several prints from his represent- 
ative drawings. The appearance of the book 
itself bespeaks its original and artistic con- 
tent, and to the art of book craft, it is a 
recommendation. 

■ — Prentice Duel]. 



HAND WEAVING IN PASADENA 

THE revival of Hand-Weaving has come at 
a time when the eyes of Fashion have 
been turned, as never before in our day, to 
the brilliant and unusual fabrics of the Ori- 
ent. The colorful schemes of Balkan and 
Mesopotamian dress brought out in war days 
have been even surpassed by the bright, fan- 
tastic dress of the Egyptian period of 3500 
years ago, so that reproductions on hand- 
looms by a few clever weavers nowadays are 
finding ready acceptance among persons of 
artistic taste. 

It is possible to produce on the hand-loom 
a fabric in both texture and design which 
the cumbersome and rigidly mechanical pow- 
er loom cannot do nearly so well. The hand 
loom artist, too, conceives a new idea one 




M. ROBAIX DE L'ABRIE RICHEY AND MME. LINA RICHEY AS THEY WORKED TOGETHER IN THEIR 
STUDIO HOME IN HOLLYWOOD. PHOTOGRAPH BY WALLACE FREDERICK SEELY. 



day and the next day he weaves his dreams 
into the charming, unique fabric ready for 
milady to turn over to her dressmaker. 

The flexibility of the hand-loom permits of 
exclusive and individual patterns being wov- 
en, so that no reproductions of design need be 
made. Furthermore the weaver and the pros- 
pective wearer may sit down together in the 
studio and work out from a collection of at- 
tractive threads, a design to meet perfectly 
the needs of the case — a sports skirt to match 
a cherished sweater — a jacquette or cape to 
harmonize with the skirt, or, in fact, the 
scarf, the hand bag and the hat band may 
all be woven to bring about a color har- 
mony quite impossible in any other way, un- 
less at the cost of endless trouble. 

The possibilities in the realm of Dress are 
almost exceeded when one comes to consider 
Hand Weaving for home decorations — artistic 
window draperies, portieres, couch covers, bed 
spreads and floor rugs, being some of the items 
which may be done to perfection on the hand 
loom by the practiced artisan. 

Exponents of this work are the Hewsons — 
father and son — who have a very artistic 
studio in Pasadena. Their long experience 



in this country and abroad perhaps accounts 
for the success with which their compara- 
tively new venture has met in this field, for 
their attractively woven materials are being 
sent to distant points as well as to nearby 
customers, and we learn that enlargements 
are contemplated. 



r 



To obtain information, or consult in re- 
gard to a safe first mortgage investment, 
through The John M. C. Marble Company, 
address 

Mrs. Gertrude M. Fuller 
499 Ellis Street Pasadena 
Telephone F. O. 725 



HEWSON STUDIOS 

HANDWOVEN HOMESPUNS For 
Dresses, Skirts, Scarfs, Blankets and Bags 



602 E Colorado St. 

Phone: Fair Oaks 6555 



Pasadena 



REDLANDS REVIVES THE ART OF WEAVING 

THE sincere interest which communities are taking in the loom 
and its product was shown lately in Redlands where the Arts 
and Crafts Guild arranged a unique program for the Contemporary 
Club. 

The entire stage space and the curtains of the main auditorium 
were covered with wonderful tapestries, many of which were made by 
the great grandmothers of those present, some dating even farther 
back than that. It was a surprise to the audience to find just how 
many of the valuable coverlets, now counted as treasures, were 
owned by Redlands people, who loaned them for the occasion. 

Mrs. George Hinckley, chairman of the program committee, in- 
troduced Miss Mary Louise Arnold, president of the Guild, who 
had the afternoon in charge. 

Miss Margaret Sanborn, who has herself done an interesting 
work in weaving, gave a history of the art, tracing it back to the 
days before Christ and describing its stages of progress. Herbert 
Pope of the West Coast Textile Company described and explained the 
Jacquard loom which was first used in France in 1725 with suc- 
cess. It was almost as complicated as a watch, Mr. Pope stated. He 
explained the making of patterns and weaving, showing the chart 
made by the designer in tiny blocks representing threads of the 
material. He exhibited several beautiful towels the pattern for one 
of which was made by Miss Ethel Ann Meiser of Redlands. Mr. 
Pope believes that Southern California is asleep to its textile pos- 
sibilities, and that with Imperial cotton the strongest in the world, 
this section of the country should become one of the greatest centers 
in the United States. 

One of the delightful features of the program was the group 



of readings which Miss Arnold gave from Eliza Calvert Hall's book, 
"Hand Woven Coverlets", introduced with a poem on "Kivers". The 
readings carried one back to the old, old days, which grandmothers 
have talked about, when spinning and weaving were women's pas- 
time, and when great blue and white counterpanes and coverlets, 
covered the four poster beds. "Sunrise" and "Trailing Vine" and 
"Young Man's Fancy" were only a few of the delightful names given 
to the coverlet designs. 

Miss A. Camp, whose art is well known to many residents of 
Redlands, spoke particularly of fabrics, bringing out the fact that 
time is an absolute necessity when it comes to weaving. Not only 
the need of coverings, but the necessity for self expression, brought 
forth wonderful effects in the field of weaving and designing she 
explained. 

Some of the homespun linens and other articles sent to Miss 
Camp by her cousin, I. Cushman Gray, from France were exhibited, 
also cloth made from paper in Germany during the war. 

Among the handsome coverlets exhibited yesterday were those 
belonging to Paul W. Moore, Miss May C. Moore, Mrs. U. F. Lewis, 
Mrs. Sarah Lewis, Mrs. D. M. Kirkpatrick, Mrs. F. P. Meserve, Miss 
Bertha King, Mrs. Frank Jackson, Mr. Williams, Mrs. Auchincloss, 
Mrs. George Bunnell, Mrs. Bert Hatfield, Miss Harriet Beckwith, 
Mrs. L. D. Eichhorn. A magnificent tapestry, which covered almost 
the entire curtain space on the stage, was loaned by Miss 0. E. P. 
Stokes. It is from the Gobelin mills. Among other exhibits were 
homespun blankets, towels and a table cloth belonging to Miss May 
Moore, with them a quaint and lovely water color picture of the lady 
who wove and made the towels. Miss Camp also exhibited homespun 
articles and Miss Florence Birks exhibited a wonderful collection of 
Italian, Mexican and Indian woven rugs. 



24 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



(Continued from page 13) 
the great fountainhead of irrigation for the San Bernardino Valley. 
Its possibilities as a storage reservoir were first brought to notice in 
1880 from a survey made by the state engineer. The newly founded 
colony of Redlands was looking for a greater water supply and in 
1883 Mr. F. E. Brown and Hiram Barton went into the mountains 
and examined Bear Valley. They were convinced that a great stor- 
age reservoir could be constructed and as a result of their report a 
company was most enthusiastically formed, being incorporated in 
October, 1883. The dam was completed in November, 1884, and, con- 
trary to many prophecies, it withstood the pressure of both water 
and ice upon it. It formed an artificial lake five and a half miles 
long when the water was at a depth of 57 feet at the dam. A second 
dam, 72 feet high, has since been built a few feet below the first, and 
it forms the present Bear Valley Lake. 

Immediately upon the construction of the dam, land and water 
values increased by leaps and bounds and almost as quickly litigation 
and lawsuits followed. It was planned to carry water to Alessandro, 
in Moreno Valley, and the Alessandro pipeline was constructed. The 
original company had reincorporated as the Bear Valley Irrigation 
Co., which, with its auxiliary companies, had sold a large amount of 




THE DAM WHICH FORMS BEAU VALLEY LAKE. THE SOURCE OF REDLANDS' 
WATER SUPPLY 

stock in England and Scotland. In 1893 the Alessandro Irrigation 
District brought suit against the Bear Valley Co. leading to investi- 
gation by its foreign stockholders and creditors, to the utter collapse 



INDIAN LOOKOUT CAMP 

* S c< ^^^ FOR girls 

yi^p J^^^^^ Eighth Season 

I N llll. MENDOCINO REDWOODS. SWIMMING, 

(et^^- — 4 CANOEING. HORSEBACK RIDING, NATURE LORE, 

J i J CAMP-CRAFT, OVERNIGHT TRIPS. 

^JK ' I Dr. and Mrs. E. H. Sawyer 

ij~^p^> / Experienced Counselors — Personal Interview Desired 
W"*?^^ y Telephone Glendale II69-M 

_-»^ 1104 E. Wilson Ave. Glendale, Calif. 



of its rosy prospects and striking a death blow to the. Moreno Valley 
plans. 

In spite of this early financial and legal confusion Bear Valley 
water has developed hundreds of acres of land and brought wealth 
and prosperity to the upper San Bernardino Valley. 




BEAK VALLEY LAKE 

In 1912 the City of Redlands purchased the domestic water dis- 
tributing system, putting in pumping plants to supply the total domes- 
tic and municipal needs of the city, thus releasing the Bear Valley 
water used at this time for further irrigation. The present municipal 
plant of Redlands has a capacity of 13,000,000 gallons delivery a day. 

Redlands, situated as it is at the base of the San Bernardino Moun- 
tains, is in a position to have an ample water supply for all needs. 
The conservation of the winter run should be developed in the future 
as it has been in the past. The construction of Bear Valley Lake was 
the first important step in our water conservation. About 1907 the 
Tri-Counties Reforestation Committee, under the direction of Francis 
Cuttle, started the conservation of the surplus run-off of the Santa 
Ana River by spreading it on the debris cone at the mouth of the 
Santa Ana Canyon. In 1909 this work was transferred to the Water 
Conservation Association which has steadily increased the amount of 
this work up to present time. Other water users are spreading the 
surplus run-off of Mill Creek before it reaches the Santa Ana. The 
process of storing the winter flow and storm waters in the gravel 
beds for future beneficial use is in its infancy but gives promise of 
becoming an economical method of storage. It will also add very 
greatly to the supply of surface storage and summer stream flow. 
The water is regained from the underground storage by pumping and 
by increased spring and artesian well flow. 

PASADENA HARDWARE COMPANY 

has been dispensing Hardware to the particular people of Pasadena for 
the past 36 years. Cheap Hardware is an abomination. We only handle 
the best. We solicit your patronage. 

66 to 76 West Colorado St. 
Service and Quality is our slogan. 



THE EPICURE'S PANTRY 
OR the Frenchman dining is an art; of a necessity 
cooking also becomes an art, and finally a profession 
of which the members are very proud. This desire to per- 
form one's service in the manner of an artist is carried 
out into all the duties connected with the serving of food. 
We have, then, the market man and market women who 
arrange their produce in an attractive manner, and the 
gardeners who give infinite care to each plant and each 
flower or fruit. 

CALIFORNIA is blessed with a climate much like the 
south of France. All of the fine foods which the 
French have developed can doubtless be raised here. We 
must develop also that infinite care, that love of beautiful, 
perfect fruit and vegetables. Not size alone is the desire 
of the expert gardener. The color and scent of the flower 
are more important than its size; the flavor and perfec- 
tion of the fruit are the test of intelligence in the horti- 
cnlturalist. 

WE have now on the streets of Los Angeles beautiful 
looking fruit arranged in symmetrical rows by 
careful attendants. It is worthy the inspired brush of 
F jme artist. The green and red of apples, the yellow of 
the orange, the pomegranate, the purple and pale green 
masses of fresh vegetables. We shall see how all this 
beauty of color may be preserved in the flavor of the pre- 
pared food. No less than eight individual flavors should 
find themselves in the dressing of oil and vinegar which 
we pour over our beautiful firm lettuce from the Imperial 
Valley. Do we raise also these delicate herbs with which 
to flavor our foods. We shall see! 

THERE is a man here in Los Angeles who knows how 
to blend good coffees so that the flavor of all aromas 
is retained. But one cannot make a cheap coffee out of 
the best bean. If you want a cheap coffee use chicory. 



UNIQUE STORE of A. J. MATHIEU CO. 
642 South Flower St., between Sixth and Seventh 




CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



25 



PLANNING A MISSION CITY— VENTURA 



By RUSSELL VAN NEST BLACK 
CITY PLANNER 



The city and its immediate environs are being divided into large 
general districts, respectively, for the use of business, residence and 
industry. The relation of these districts to one another is being deter- 
mined by such consideration as proximity of workmen's homes to the 
job, the convenience of stores to homes, the direction of prevailing 
winds, fertility and general character of the soil, topography and 
many other factors all concerned with the convenience, health, 
comfort, and general prosperity of the city. To the extent that these 
districts are contained within the city limits they are being estab- 
lished by a zoning ordinance. Outside the city limits these districts 
are held in plan until such time as the city boundaries may be 
extended. The object of this districting is not to interfere with 
the logical expansion of the community, but to hold the various uses 
in the most advantageous and least injurious relation to one another. 

With a knowledge of the probable character and needs of the 
undeveloped rim of the present city, new major street locations are 
being extended in such a manner as to give free access to and through 
the center of the city from all directions and with a minimum of 
confusion. The placing of purely residential streets is beng left more 
to individual initiative. These are none the less important in their 
relation to the daily lives of the residents of a community, but mis- 
takes in laying out these minor streets do not lead to the dire con- 
sequences that result from disregarding the logical line of one of a 
city's few arterial thoroughfares. Mapped locations, therefore, are 
being laid down for the main thoroughfares of the larger city and 
the designs of residential streets will be required to conform to cer- 
tain minimum provisions for economy, comfort, convenience, and 
appearance. 

In the already platted area, desirable street extensions are being 
mapped. New streets are being laid to pick up the dead ends of care- 
lessly platted streets in order that these objectionable pockets in the 
circulation and life of the city may be removed. Streets are being 
mapped along the ocean front in such manner as to hold the entire 
frontage forever accessible to the public. 

Building set-back lines are being established on all streets to 
insure an orderly appearance and to preclude further damage through 
the thoughtless, and selfish crowding of buildings out beyond the line 
observed by existing structures. 

The present city has approximately seventy-five acres of park 
land at its command, but the Ventura of ten or twenty years hence 
will need more. In natural park land and open spaces, Ventura is 
unusually blessed. On the one side there are the mountains which 
can never be destroyed. On the other is the ocean with its broad 
curving beach which needs but to be kept unobstructed and open to 
the free access of the people. Adjacent to the coming residential 
district there is a large area ideally adapted to park and playground 
use, but not of great value for residence or industry and which is 
yet to be acquired. 

The aim of the A. J. Mathieu Co. is to make itself "The House 
for the Epicure." It will not seek to supply the ordinary needs of 
the pantry. It was designed to satisfy the discriminating demands 
of those to whom dining is an art, and is exclusively a high class 
shop where the most delectable foods of the world are to be found. 

The treasured viands of Paris, London and Italy have been gath- 
ered within the four walls of the A. J. Mathieu store. Names known 
to every epicure are to be seen on its shelves. American confec- 
tions have not been overlooked and the rareties of the nation and 
particularly California are available here. 

Mr. Mathieu was connected with leading grocers in San Francisco 
for eighteen years. 



The A. J. Mathieu Company 

The House of the Epicure 



yf T one of the little tables in this unique store we 
sat while Mr. Mathieu personally filled my or- 
der and told me what to take on a camping trip. 
A salad dressing he favored, some very particular cheese 
in a round box, each partition done up in tinfoil, cold, 
chicken in glass and cold tongue that made one's mouth 
water. If hat a privilege it is to have this store as the 
summer begins to call us to camp and beach or moun- 
tain bungalow! 



Draperies 




Furniture 




JOHN F. LUCCARENI 






INTERIOR DECORATOR 






3876 West Sixth St. 




Phone 560-658 




Los Angeles 



The city plan is taking all of these things into consideration. 
Its efforts will be to conserve the natural park resources of the 
community and to point out an extension of a modest park system 
adequate to the recreation needs of the city that is coming. 

Public building sites, especially new school sites, and other public 
and semi-public properties are not being forgotten. The plan is 
including approximate sites for new schools and for other public 
buildings. The community has already handled its cemetery problem 
in a very far-sighted way by taking its new burial grounds out some 
three or four miles from the center of the city where there is little 
probability of its ever interfering with logical growth. 

Nor is the matter of improving the appearance of the city by the 
planting of trees and shrubs along the streets and on private property 
being forgotten. 

In short, the city fathers, through the help of the city planner 
they have employed for this purpose, are attempting to do everything 
within the range of foresight and careful thought to insure the best 
growth of the city. 

They are not attempting to do this work in an arbitrary fashion, 
but are encouraging the suggestion and help of the citizens in every 
possible way. The newspapers are behind the idea and are giving 
much space to the progress of the plan and its general purpose. 
Especially in the matter of zoning, the citizens are being consulted; 
it being the idea of the commission that zoning is a protection and 
not a restriction and that the property owners themselves oftentimes 
know best when they are being actually protected. The plans are 
being explained in detail to all civic clubs and other interested organ- 
izations. They are being outlined to the children at school. Every 
possible effort is being made to create an understanding of the plan 
and its purpose. And this is as it should be, because no city plan 
can function properly without the understanding and support of the 
large majority of those directly concerned. 

All of this means that Ventura, the San Buenaventura of the 
padres, is in a fair way to become one of the most prosperous and 
one of the most livable smaller cities in California. It is coming into 
a knowledge of itself and is grasping its problems and its opportunities. 



Boot of Bridle 
forest Club- 



{ SUBDIVISION) 




In the wilds of the Malibou 
mountains, but a quarter of a 
mile from the Ventura Boule- 
vard. Deer, quail and rabbit 
hunting — the best in Southern 
California — adjoins Las Turas 
Lake property — one of the 
largest lakes in California . 
HUNTING LODGE Lots— 75x 
200 — incudes membership in 
club. Pay $ 1 monthly and 
move on your lot. Scenic 
view, giant live oaks. Adja- 
cent to Sherwood Forest, and 
only 30 miles from Hollywood. 
Motor out on the Ventura 
Boulevard — you can't miss the 
spot. Scout Brock's office at 
the new town of THOUSAND 
OAKS. Anybody on the Ven- 
tura Boulevard will tell you 
where THOUSAND OAKS is. 



BOOT 8c BRIDLE FOREST CLUB 



100 SAN FERNANDO BLDG. 
TEL. BDWY. 64 1 



Ladies! Save Your Shoes! 
Auto Heel Protector 

Made of Leaih -r. Fits securely cn Slice 
rr Slipper Protects heel and counU r 
from GREASE, SCUFFING and WEAR. 
Easily and quickly adjusted. 

t P. / FRENCH 
Y utVlBS BABY FRENCH 
^ J CUBAN 

STATE STYLE OF HEEL REQUIRED 

$1.50 Per Pair Prepaid 

J. E. F. Distributing Co. 
1101 Garland Bldg., LOS ANGELES, CAL. 




1 820130 
PHONES J | 822803 




An office for your 
business at $10.00 
per month 



CAMPBELL OFFICE SERVICE 




823-824 LOEWS STATE BUILDING 

BROADWAY AT SEVENTH LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



26 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



THE MONEY MARKET LESLIE B *' HENRY 

Heiident Manager. Blythe, Witter & Co., Pasadena 

IT OLDERS of either stocks or bonds of our larger California oil 
* * companies have been wondering what the result on their in- 
vestment will be should reductions in prices of crude oil continue be- 
yond the level already reached. Many of them have fancied they 
found cause for alarm in this situation and imagined that from it 
could come only reduced dividends or impaired surpluses, or more ser- 
ious than either of these, the virtual wastage of oil below ground 
through sale at unprofitable prices. 

The fact is that reductions of crude oil prices in California mean 
a strengthening of the strategic position of the larger oil companies, 
little or no embarrassment of their present prosperity, and eventual 
advantages from the situation almost beyond computation in dollars. 

Reduction in the price of crude oil acts adversely against only one 
phase of the activities of the larger oil companies, namely, oil in stor- 
age purchased at high prices. However, since the total storage of any- 
one of the companies represents but a fraction of the total turn-over 
in stored oil which the companies accomplish each year, but a fraction 
of the profits to be derived from this oil is lost. Since all of our large 
companies are not only producers of crude oil, but look to transporta- 
tion, refining, manufacturing, and shipment throughout the United 
States and abroad, and in most cases even the retailing of refined pro- 
ducts, for a large part of their income, they still have opportunity 
through the phases of the oil business other than production of crude 
to safeguard themselves against any marked loss of even that part 
of their oil which was in storage previous to a cut in price. 

It is those companies, hundreds in number throughout California, 
that are engaged only in the production of oil and whose product is 
of value only as the larger companies afford a market for it, who are 
hard hit by cuts in crude oil prices, as crude oil is the only source of 
profit to them. Since most of these companies are operating on a 
scheme of hand-to-mouth financing at tremendous overhead cost in ar- 
ranging for money, they are compelled to continue production of crude 
oil even when operating at a minimum or even no profit at all in order 
to meet the obligations of their precarious business. 

During periods of low prices for crude such companies as the 
General Petroleum Corporation, Standard Oil of California, Union Oil. 
Associated, and similar concerns fill up their reserve storage, at the 
same time cutting off production as far as possible from their own 
wells, and by affording little or no market for oil from the independent 
producers over and beyond their own storage capacity, they force the 
small producers into embarrassment. 

It is during such periods as these that extremely productive acre- 



age, completely equipped with wells and free of any expensive require- 
ment for "wildcatting", fall into the hands of the larger concerns and 
work to the eventual heavy profit of the new owners. The small oil 
company promoters whose advertisements fill the newspapers contin- 
uously are the ones who lure thousands of the unwary into making 
possible the proving up of just such acreage and then, though pos- 
sessing oil wells, are unable to weather a storm of low prices for 
crude and are pleased to sacrifice their stockholders for whatever re- 
lief the larger companies can afford them in taking over their leases. 

The investors in soundly financed oil companies in California 
doing a general production, transportation, manufacturing, and mar- 
keting business can look on the falling level of crude oil prices with 
equanamity and feel cerlain that the ultimate result will be extremely 
profitable. The speculators looking for a fortune over night through 
lurid advertisements of oil stock and oil unit promotion schemes had 
better look to a quick liquidation of their holdings at any price they 
can obtain for them if they are to save any part of their gambles 
should another drop in crude oil prices occur. 



THE SAFE INVESTMENT OF MONEY 
By Gertrude M. Fuller 

A QUESTION of vital interest to women who manage their own 
** husiness affairs is the safe investment of money. In what form 
of investment can money earn the most, consistent with steady inter- 
est returns and safety of principal? 

It takes courage and judgment to avoid the attractive speculative 
propositions which constantly are presented to the public. The higher 
the interest rate, the greater the risk, so the conservative business 
man or hanker will say. There is no class of investments better 
secured than first mortgages on improved real estate. Furthermore, 
when these mortgages are supervised by a reliable investment house, 
the investor may feel himself relieved of the usual responsibility. 
Why? Because the investment house performs free of charge the 
following services: A just appraisal of the property; Security of 
a perfect title; Supervision of taxes and insurance; The upkeep of 
repairs, so the property will not depreciate in value; The collection 
and remittance of interest; The refund of principal in case of fore- 
closure. Such mortgages may be obtained from The John M. C. 
Marble Company, of Los Angeles, in amounts from $300 to many 
thousands. The mortgage is assigned to the investor and the papers 
held by him. He may sojourn in Europe for a year or more, and if 
a loan is paid in before due or has reached its expiration period, the 
principal can be replaced in an equally well secured mortgage withrmt 
the loss of a day's interest. 





A VIEW OF THE BEAUTIFUL INTERIOR OF THE RET) LANDS BRANCH OF THE HELLMAN COMMERCIAL TRUST & SAVINGS BANK. IT IS FINISHED IN 
MEXICAN ONYX AND JUANA COSTA WOOD, WHICH MAKES A VERY ATTRACTIVE COMBINATION AND ONE PARTICULARLY ADAPTABLE TO SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA. PHOTOGRAPH MADE AND COMPOSED BY FAIRBANKS AND FROST. REDLANDS, CALIFORNIA 



O INCE the entry of the Hellman Bank into Redlands there has been 
^ a ma i ked change in the condition of the town. Plenty of money 
has been available for all legitimate needs. Many new dwellings have 
been erected and one would hardly know the business district, so many 
changes have been made. Things were never more prosperous, and 
Redlands is living up to its reputation of being the best home city in 
California. With its splendid schools, the University of Redlands, and 
wonderful natural scenery, it is an ideal spot for a home. 



Redlands is the largest orange shipping point in the world. Al- 
ready this season over 3000 carloads have been shipped. 

There are branches of the Hellman Bank all over Southern Cali- 
fornia, there being sixteen in all. The branch at Redlands is under 
the direct charge of H. H. Ford, Branch Manager, and G. E. Sucher, 
Assistant Branch Manager. The wide experience of the organization 
as a whole is placed at the command of those desiring information or 
advice; and the Hellman Bank has a large circle of satisfied customers. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



27 



FLINTRIDGF 

Jfk "Southern California's f 



Choicest Residential Pdrk" 



'PHE opening of Flintridge Highlands — the 
choicest section of the famed Flintridge park- 
land — has made available some of the most desir- 
able residence sites in Southern California. 
Scenic hillside sites — shaded by oaks and sycamores 
— fanned by ocean breezes — commanding magnifi- 
cent views of mountains, valley, distant cities and 
the ocean — are now on sale at exceptionally moder- 
ate opening prices. 

Flintridge Sales Company 



Los Ange!es Office 
727 TITLE INS. BLDG. 
Tel: 10601, Main 635 



FKntridge Office 

Phone: 
Fair Oaks 212 








Pictorial 






Photographs 

of 

California Landscapes 

Hand Colored in Oil 








H j ,* ^^ML. j 


"The KORIN 

KODAK AND ART SHOP 
522 S Hill St.. Los Angeles. Cal. 




Opposite Pershing Square 




Sun kissed 

Ocean washed 
Mountain girded 
Island guarded 



SANTA BARBARA 

If you like California you will love Santa Barbara 

JOHN D. BURNHAM, Realtor 

Associated with H. G. CHASE 

1012 State Street Phone 69 




SPORTS Toggery that 
will appeal to the 
well-groomed woman 
or miss, correct styles for 
eve y occasion of the 
season. 



BROADWAY COR. SIXTH 
LOS ANGELES 



THE BATCHELDER TILES 




We produce Tile for Fireplaces, Fountains, Pave- 
ments, Garden Pots— anything that is appropriately 
made from clay. :: :: :: :: :: 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



Blue Diamond 





Materials Cojnc 




A book of photographs, sketches, and plans of represent- 
ative California homes designed by your leading archi- 
tects. Price $1.00. Title— ''California Homes." 

Address: Ellen Leech 
544 So. El Molino Ave., Pasadena. Calif. 



^ Blue Diamond 

Electric 
Stucco 



Pacific-Southwest iki Bank 

FORMERLY LOS ANGELES TRUST ft SAVINGS BANK 

Affiliated in ownership with The First 
National Bank of Los Angeles and the 
First Securities Company 

Serving the Pacific-Southwest through many 
conveniently located branches in Los Angeles and 
in the following California cities: 



Alhambra 
Atascadero 
Carpinteria 
Catalina Island 
El Centro 

Fresno, Fidelity Br. 
Glendale. 

Clendale Ave. Br. 

Brand Blvd. Br. 
Guadalupe 
Hanford 

Huntington Park 

Lemoore 

Lindsay 

Lompoc 

Long Beach 

Long Beach Br. 

Belmont Heights Bt. 

Atlantic Avenue Br. 

Pike Branch 
Los Alamos 
Ocean Park 
Orcutt 



Oxnard 
Pasadena 

Pasadena Br. 

Oak Knoll Br. 

/Utadena Br. 
Paso Robles 
Redlands 
San Fernando 
San Luis Ob;--, 
San Pedro 

Marine Branch 

San Pedro Br. 
Santa Ana 
Santa Barbara 

Commercial of Santa 

Barbara Br. 
Santa Maria 
Santa Monica 
Tulare 
Venice 
Visalia 
Whittier 

Community Branch 
Wilmington 



Financial Strength 



of a community is gauged by the 
strength of its banks. 

Pasadena banks on Apr. 1923, held 
total deposits of over $40,067,000. a 
gain in one year of $6,824/^2. 
Not only as a beautiful city with ideal 
climatic conditions but also in growth 
of business and financial stability 
Pasadena appeals to the home seeker. 



PASADENA CLEARING 
HOUSE ASSOCIATION 



'LOCATIONS" IN THE GARDENS OF CALIFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA 
SOUTHLAND 




No. 43 JULY, 1923 20 Cents 

C a I if o r n i a 9 s Home and Garden Magazine 



C A LI FORK I A SOUTH L A K D 



nil: iiniiiii i nniiiNimilinnl m 

SOUTHLAND 
I CALENDAR 



^llllllillllllllllMlllllllllllllllllinilMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMMIIil 

Announcements of exhibitions, fetes, 
'oncerts, club entertainments, etc., for 
the calendar pages are free of charge and 
ihould be received in the office of Cali- 
fornia Southland, Pasadena, at least 
two weeks previous to date of issue. WO 
corrections can be guaranteed if they are 
received later than that date. 

The public is warned that photog- 
raphers have no authority to arrange for 
fittings, free of charge or otherwise, for 
publication in Southland unless appoint- 
ments have been made especially in writ- 
ing by the Editor. 



California Southland is published monthly at 
Pasadena. California. One dollar and twenty 
rents for six issues, two dollars per year. Ad- 
dresses will be changed as many times as de- 
tired if notice is given before the first of the 
month in which the change is made. 

Entered as second class matter. July 2S 191V 
it the Post Office at Pasadena, California, 
under act of March 3, 1879. 



w 



Clubs 

VALLEY HUNT CLUB: 
The formal season at the Valley Hunt 
Club closed with May, after which 
time no programs are arranged. The 
tennis court and swimming pool offer 
the outdoor attractions during the 
summer, and individual parties, both 
afternoon and evening, are arranged 
as desired. 

ANNANDALE GOLF CLUB : 
The afternoon bridge, Mah Jongg and 
tea parties have been discontinued for 
the season, but tea will be served as 
requested and tables for cards are al- 
ways available. , 
The second Friday of each month is 
open day at the club. 
The usual Wednesday and Saturday 
sweepstakes each month through the 
summer. 

FLINTRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies" Day has been changed from 
Monday to the first Tuesday in every 
month. On every Ladies' Day the 
women golfers from the clubs in the 
Southern California Association will 
be welcome. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies Days, second Monday of each 
month. 

Music during dinner, followed by 
dancing, every Saturday evening 
during the month. 

Luncheon served from 11:30 to 2 
p. m. on Saturdays. 

Sunday night concerts during month 
twice a month. 

Tea served as requested and tables 
for cards always available. 

ILSHIRE COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies' Days, third Monday of each 
month. , . 

Dancing every second and fourth 
Saturdays during the month. 
A musical is arranged for each Sun- 
day night in the month. 

MIDWICK COUNTRY CLUB: 
Ladies' Days, fourth Monday in each 
month. 

Tea and informal bridge every after- 
noon. 

Polo, Wednesday and Saturday of 
each week. 

Dancing every Saturday night in the 
month. 

| OS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLUB: 

* J Dinner dances, Tuesday and Friday 

nights of every week. Tuesday night 

informal ; Friday night semi-formal. 

Plunge open to the ladies Tuesday and 

Friday of every week. 

MONTECITO COUNTRY CLUB: 
Provides an 18 hole golf course, two 
concrete and two dirt courts for ten- 
nis, bowls and croquet. 
Tea is served and informal bridge 
parties arranged as desired. 
A buffet supper is served every Sun- 
day night. 

pASADENA GOLF CLUB: 

The swimming pool is open to mem- 
bers and their guests every day ex- 
cept Saturday and Sunday, which are 
reserved for members, and luncheon 
will be served every Sunday from 12 
until 2 o'clock. 

NEWPORT HARBOR YACHT CLUB: 
Wednesday. July 4, Holiday Races, 
Dinner and Dance at Club House. 
Friday, July 6, 12 :30, Ladies' luncheon 
and reception, Club House (Bridge 
and Mah Jongg.) 

Saturday, July 7, Fleet Cruise to Ava- 
lon. Dance, informal. 





Florentine Credenza 
of the lbth Century 
From the Studio 

of 



Cannell $ Chaff tit, 

Paintings :: Period Furniture :: Antiques 
720 WEST SEVENTH STREET 
LOS ANGELES 



Marshall Laird 

Furniture of Character 




jf W7 



WORK SHOP 
416 EAST NINTH STREET 



LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA 



Sunday, July 8, Open. 
Saturday, July 14 (Sailing Classes) 
Cruise and races to Santa Barbara 
Regatta, free-for-all, start 9:30 a. m. 
Sunday, July IB (Power Boats!, Cruise 
and Races to Santa Barbara Regatta, 
free-for-all, start 4 p. m. 
Friday, July 13, 12 -.30, Ladies' Weekly 
Luncheon (Cards and Mah Jonggl. 
Saturday, the 14th, Informal Dance. 
Monday, July 16, to Sunday, July 22, 
Annual Regatta of Southern Califor- 
nia Yachting Association, Santa Bar- 
bara. 

Sunday, July 22, Start of Honolulu 
Race, Santa Barbara. 
Match and Grudge Races, Santa Bar- 
bara to Newport. 
Saturday, July 28, Open. 
Sunday, July 2'J. Open. 
Friday, July 27, Ladies' Weekly- 
Luncheon, 12:30 (Cards and Mah 
Jonggl. Saturday evening. Club In- 
formal Dance. 



Art 

rpHE Los Angeles Museum, Exposition 
Park, held an exhibition of water 
colors, pastels, illustrations, etchings and 
drawings during the month of June which 
continued into July. This is the Salma- 
gundi Club show held in New York, April 
8 to 25, and was secured for the Los An- 
geles Museum by the director on his re- 
cent trip to New York. The Salmagundi 
Club was organized in 1871 and is com- 
posed of painters, sculptors, architects, 
engineers, illustrators, musicians and au- 
thors. They maintain in their club house. 
47 Fifth Ave., their own galleries and 
library and hold various exhibitions of the 
work of their members, the two most im- 
portant being an annual exhibition of oil 
painting and an annual exhibition of 
water colors and prints, which the Los 
Angeles Museum is now fortunate enough 
to have. 

The purchase by Henry E. Huntington 
of Normal S. Chamberlain's painting., 
"Adobe Flores," which was aw-arded first 
prize at the recent annual painters' and 
sculptors' exhibition at the museum, was 
announced by officials of the museum, who 
also stated that the painting has been pre- 
sented to the institution for its permanent 
collection. 

The museum is open daily from 10 a. m. 
to 4 p. m., except Wednesday afternoons. 
Open Sunday 2 p. m. to 5 p. m. Admis- 
sion free. 

"yHE Southwest Museum, Marmion Way 
and Avenue 46, Los Angeles, an- 
nounces : 

The programs conducted under the su- 
pervision of the Extension Department 
will be discontinued during the months 
of July. August and September, but will 
be resumed October 1. 

The children activities will also be dis- 
continued during July, August and Sep- 
tember, hut will be resumed October 1, 
under the joint supervision of Miss Ethel 
Phillips and the Extension Department of 
the Museum. 

The Southwest Museum is in need of 
hand looms. Anyone who can aid in locat- 
ing a loom, available as a pattern, kindly 
communicate with Extension Department. 

r\OUGLAS DONALDSON announces a 
summer school for teachers, laymen 
and professional artists to be held in the 
Donaldson Studio on Melrose Hill in Holly- 
wood, beginning Monday, July 9 a and end- 
ing August 12. There will be but two 
classes, each meeting three days a week. 

AT LEONARD'S. 6814 Hollywood Boule- 
vard. the June exhibition, which will 
continue until July 10, is composed of 
works by Western painters and sculptors. 
The exhibitions at this gallery will run 
in monthly rotation, the 10th being the 
opening day for each show. 

/""<LARK HOBART'S beautiful monotypes 
^ will grace the walls of the Cannell 
and Chaffm Galleries, July 2 to 14. A 
monotype, you know, is a transfer on 
choice paper from an oil painting on a 
metal plate by running it through a press 
Thus only one print is possible — hence the 
name monotype. These pictures are deco- 
rative, fanciful, lovely in color. The chief 
charm that distinguishes them is the 
tapestry-like quality of the color and tex- 
ture. The subjects are mostly figures in 
landscape, nicely . disposed, pleasing in 
color, imaginative or poetic, rather than 
realistic in interpretation. 

rpHE exhibition of the work of the mem- 
bers of the West Coast Arts, Inc., will 
be the only collection of paintings shown 
by an association at the "Monroe Doc- 
trine Centennial," to be held in Los An- 
geles in July. The exhibit will be held 
in the women's building and will be made 
a feature of the women's department. 
This young organization is composed en- 
tirely of women painters and sculptors, 
and is recognized as an important factor 
in building up an art center in Southern 
California. 

The time was so short it was impossible 
to secure many examples of the work of 
the Eastern members for this exhibit : 
but one of the aims of the organization 
is to broaden the work of the California 
women artists by bringing to the coast 
other artists' work. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



A COLLECTION of fine old English 
sporting prints will be on view at the 
Cannell and Chaffin galleries at the end 
of July, the exact dates to be announced 
later. These will include hunting and 
coaching subjects, many of them of great 
beauty and rarity. 

JOHN RICH'S latest portraits and sub- 
" ject pictures will go on display July 
16 to 28 at the Cannell and Chaffin Gal- 
leries. This artist, who is one of our 
best portrait painters, if not the best, 
needs no introduction to the "cognoscenti." 
Every large exhibition has a representa- 
tive portrait or subject picture from his 
brush. His works have been awarded 
prizes at various shows. At all times he 
is a sincere artist and able technician. 

A T the annual meeting of the California 
Water Color Society June 22, the fol- 
lowing officers were elected for the ensuing 
year: President, Henri De Kruif, first 
vice-president, Theodore Modra ; second 
vice-president, Dana Bartlett ; secretary, 
John Cotton ; treasurer, Dona Schuster. 
The new jury is composed of Dana Bart- 
lett ; Theodore Modra, Hanson Puthuff, 
Max Wieezorek, John Cotton. Alternates, 
Henri De Kruif, Dona Schuster. 

The third annual exhibition of the so- 
ciety will open September 12 at the Los 
Angeles Museum in conjunction with the 
International Traveling Water Color Dis- 
play. 

T3USSELL IREDELL will hold an ex- 
hibition of his portrait drawings at 
the Cannell and Chaffin Galleries, July 2 
to 14th. These are portraits of well 
known people of society and filmdom, done 
in pencil, crayon and pastel in combina- 
tion. Likenesses seem to be easily 
achieved and made permanent in his dis- 
tinctive style. The drawings are charac- 
terized by directness and simplicity. The 
artist, formerly of New York, after a 
residence in Hollywood of a year and a 
half ,has decided to stay permanently. 
He is much interested in community spirit, 
having charge of the artistic direction of 
the Bowl programs. 

OTIS WILLIAMS has just taken a stu- 
dio on the third floor of the Lyceum 
Theater building, Los Angeles, where he 
will work and paint part of the summer 
at least. He plans a sketching trip to 
Laguna and in all probability will visit 
Carmel and Monterey. 

THE Cannell and Chaffin Print Room is 
becoming a resort for all who are in- 
terested in etchings, for they have a re- 
markably large and complete collection of 
prints by present and past masters of this 
fascinating art. j 
TN the Stendahl Galleries at the Ambas- 
sador, during July, will be shown paint- 
ings by Peter Van Veen, of the East and 
California. Mr. Van Veen has just re- 
ceived a letter from Queen Elizabeth of 
Belgium, expressing her appreciation of 
his work in the painting of Capistrano, 
which she recently purchased. 

rpHE Cannell and Chaffin Print Room 
is showing a collection of lithographs 
by George Bellows, from July 2 to July 
14, inclusive. Bellows is one of the mod- 
ern masters of this medium, and develops 
the rich color-suggestion possible to this 
black and white medium — in notable con- 
trast to the pale and delicate manner of 
Whistler. The prints are of three distinct 
types ; delineation of modern life, drawn 
with considerable humor ; these include a 
number of prize-fight lithographs, one or 
which, "Stag at Sharkey's," is an undis- 
puted masterpiece. Then there are alle- 
gorical compositions somewhat allied in 
design to those of Arthur B. Davies, and 
a number of fine portraits. 

rpWO very delightful musicales were 
given by Mr. and Mrs. Dana Bartlett 
at their new residence studios, 101 South 
Virgil Avenue, Los Angeles, on the even- 
ings of Friday, June 22, and Saturday, 
June 23. Several new paintings by Mi. 
Bartlett were shown. 

TV/TAX WIECZOREK is showing a group 
of figure studies at the Los Angeles 
Athletic Club. The studies are "Mater 
Dolorosa." "Monna Vanna" and "Serenata 
Morisca." 

AT the Kanst Gallery Paul Lauritz is 
exhibiting new landscapes, and James 
Alfred Dewey is showing studies of the 
desert. 

rpHE Laguna Beach Art Association has 
secured a most desirable location for 
the new art gallery. The lot is on the cliffs, 
n~ar the oce^n front and on the boulevard. 
The new gallerv will be built as soon as 
the necessary funds are guaranteed, but 
in the meantime the old gallerv is housing 
the summer exhibition of the Laguna 
Beach Art Association, thirty-four artists 
being represented. 

TOURING the first part of July in the 
Stendahl Galleries at the Maryland 
Hotel, Pasadena, paintings by California 
artists will be shown. The last week in 
July will be a retrospective showing of 
Joseph Kleitsch. 

TT'ARL YENS is holding an exhibition of 
. paintings at th» Norse Club, 1666 
Wilcox Avenue, Hollywood. 




Music 



















I^Bm ■HI 












.L£;:i } V 




i 

s 


3ULLOCKS 

p O C t. 5 ^» ^ y One o'clock Satu 
S t o r- €" 


'day's 



HPHE Hollywood cowi Summer Concerts 
are announced for each Tuesday, Thurs- 
day, Friday and Saturday nights at 8 :3(1 
for eight weeks, beginning July 10. Emil 
Oherhoffer has been selected as director. 
Sylvain Noark is to be the concertmaster, 
and Mr. Svedrofsky will be the second con- 
certmaster. The orchestra will be com- 
posed of seventy-five or more players, and 
the programs will be equally good, or 
better than those of last season. 

TX/TAY MAC DONALD HOPE, founder of 

X the Los Angeles Trio, announces that 
plans for next season include the presen- 
tation of six concerts in Los Angeles, be- 
ginning in October, and given about six 
weeks apart ; the concerts to be under the 
direction of France Goldwater. 

The personnel of the Trio remains the 
same: May MacDonald Hope, pianist; 
Calmon Luboviski, violinist, and Ilya 
Bronson, violon-cellist. 

The artists will remain in Los Angelei 
all summer and have planned to work up 
a new repertoire, featuring more modern 
and American compositions than hereto- 
fore. Arrangements are being made with 
American composers for the eompositiuns 
of trios to be used for these concerts. 

A season of out-of-town concerts is 
now being booked, which will no doubt 
extend into a tour of the Pacific Coast 
at the close of the symphony season. 

THE announcement by the Los Angeles 
Chamber Music Society of twelve con- 
certs next season is very gratifying to 
the many who found pleasure in the offer- 
ings which were given by this organiza- 
tion last year to appreciative audiences at 
the Gamut Club Auditorium. 

The society will again present a con- 
cert each by the San Francisco Chamber 
Music Society and the London String 
Quartet. Works from the classics and in- 
teresting novelties will be presented next 
season as was the case the season just 
closed. The Los Angeles Chamber Music 
Society combines the following: Phil- 
harmonic Quartet, Sylvain Noack, first 
violin ; Henry Svedrofsky, second violin ; 
Emile Ferir, viola ; Ilya Bronson, violon- 
cello ; L'Ensemble Moderne, Henri De 
Busscher, obe ; Emile Ferir, viola ; Blanche 
Rogers Lott, piano, and the L'Ensemble 
Classique, Henry Svedrofsky, violin; Emil 
Ferir, viola ; Fritz Gaillard, violoncello, 
md Blanche Rogers Lott, piano. 

'J'HE rapidly increasing size of Los An- 
geles as an art and educational center 
is noted in the growth of its leading insti- 
tutions. Among these, the Cumnock 
School is marking a new era in its service 
to young women in the erection of its 
beautiful buildings on West Third Street, 
occupying the length of a block, between 
Las Palmas and McCadden streets. 

Miss Brooks, the director, and her archi- 
tect, Mr. Arthur S. Heineman, have made 
a careful study of the best school equip- 
ment throughout California and elsewhere, 
and many features were suggested by the 
enthusiastic faculty and student body, who 
shared joyously in the plans from the be- 
ginning. Miss Brooks feels that she is 
most fortunate in finding an architect who 
believes that if our American youth were 
surrounded during the impressionable years 
with an atmosphere of beauty, the ideal of 
American education would reflect its refin- 
ing influence. Cumnock has been planned 
with this ideal of beauty very definitely in 
mind. For instance, there is a solarium 
which will be used as an art gallery and 
will, at the same time, afford projection 
space for vocal exercise. 

Among other delightful features is the 
large, gently sloping court yard around 
which the buildings are arranged, to ac- 
commodate the annual May Day pageant 
as well as other out-of-door events. An 
upstairs sitting room, with kitchenette at- 
tached, suggests pleasurable hours for week 
ends and after-study refreshments. 

For twenty-nine years the Cumnock 
School has called to its doors gifted and 
ambitious young women from all parts of 
the country, lured to study there because 
of the combined cultural and professional 
value in the courses of study. Many who 
came for purely aesthetic reasons remained 
to complete their vocational equipment. 
And now the Cumnock graduates are scat- 
tered throughout the land wherever the 
platform reader, the storyteller, the 
teacher of oral and dramatic expression 
and the producer of drama are in demand. 
These courses are recognized as of college 
rank by the University of California and 
are open to recommended high school gra- 
duates. Deficient credits may be made up 
in the Cumnock Academy which is on the 
same campus. 

To the girl who wishes to pursue a high 
school course in such an atmosphere with 
accredited training in the oral arts, danc- 
ing and pantomine for their cultural value, 
this department of the school a fords uni- 
que opportunity. Accredited, in Class "A" 
at the State University, the Cumnock 
Academy stands in the first rank in 
scholarship. 



4 



C ./ L I F O R \ / ./ SO U TH L A Y D 



I 



HERBERT F. BROWN 

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California Southland 



M. Urmy Seares 


Editor and Publisher 


No. 43 


JULY, 1923 






CONTENTS 



PAGE 

The Fir Tree, Mt. Wilson, California Cover Design 

In a Redlands Garden Contents Design 

Some Southland Gardens Helen Deusner 5 

Something New in WlNDOW-BOXES . . . Theresa Hornet Patterson 7 

The California Garden Allison M. Woodman 7 

The California Troubadour 

Tribute* from Edward O'Day, Claud Simson, Leroy Brant 8-9 

The Small Garden of Miss Anna Head in Berkeley 10-11 

Southland Opinion 12-13 

The Movie as a Social Service Ellen Leech 14-15 

The Bulletin ok the Architectural Club of Los Angeles. ... 16 

The Small House Service Plan 17 

Using the Hospital and Dispensary 18 

University of California Extension in Los Angeles 18 

Women as Draughtsmen and Architects 18 

Francis Reid, Architect 19 

Ornamental Iron Craft E. A. Maloof 20 

The Santa Clara Valley 21 

The Money Market Leslie B. Henry 22 

This Magazine is the Official Organ of the Architectural Club of 
Los Angeles, California. 

CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND is published monthly at Pasadena, Cal. 

One dollar and twenty cents for six issues, two dollars for twelve 
For extra copies or back numbers call Main 4084, L. A. News Co. 

Copyrighted. 1923. by M. Urmy Seares 

ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT AND RATES 
For Pasadena advertising call Colorado 7095 
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CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF NATIONAL INTEREST 



SOME SOUTHLAND GARDENS— REDLANDS 



THE visitor to Redlands is happy to find there the fulfillment of 
his dream of Redlands fed by rumour. The dominant impression 
is of lovely, homey places most of which just grew, set among the fine 
old orange groves for which this earliest of settlements is known. Its 
age and mellowness make much of the rest of southern California 
seem startling in its newness: the old growth, towering trees, wonder- 
ful roses, and wistaria, and splendid specimens of Guadalupe cypress 
which one seldom sees elsewhere — give a fine air of dignity. 

Three gardens, very different in type but each very interesting in 
its own way, have been chosen for comment. These are not so well 
known nor as often illustrated as are the famous Smiley Heights and 
the Stirling garden in Redlands; the latter planned in the California- 
Italian style with four terraces, many palms, and avenues of Italian 
cypress trees. 

Of totally different interest is the rather new garden of Mr. 
Clarence White, also on a hillside, where hundreds of varieties of iris 
are being experimented with. To the informed amateur the garden of 
Mr. Stillman Berry is of exciting interest. There under the trees 
and in the sun, in the exposure they love best, are all sorts of rare 
things — the finest of iris, some of which are the results of his own 
hybridizing — occasional old friends from the East, such as winter- 
green and trillium, seldom encountered in southern California, but 



<=By HELEN DEUSNER 

which his skill has made appear very happy and at ease. 

The hillside garden illustrated is that of Mr. and Mrs. Kimberley, 
called Kimberly Crest. It is typical of much of the best in southern 
California and has about it a sentiment of exquisite peace such as 
one seldom finds. There are giant eucalyptus, peppers, and cypress — 
trees that give dignity to the views we so much admire. How else 
than by planting trees, which grow to be big trees, are we to have a 
frame and a foreground for our views at all in scale? 

The large, comfortable house on the uppermost level is sur- 
rounded on two sides by many flowers in succession. Great beds of 
pansies and tulips, of larkspur, pentstemen, and enough fine old trees 
give a setting to the house and a pattern of shade over driveway, lawn 
and flower beds. On the other side of the house to the north the 
whole magnificent view of snowcapped mountains and fertile valley 
opens out with the garden's hillside slope for foreground. 

The central treatment of this slope is a wide walk which one fol- 
lows from the house to the lower corner of the grounds. Crossing a 
broad grass terrace just below the house and passing a fountain the 
walk divides down two wide flights of stairs and circling a fine big 
pool where lotus grows to perfection unites again under the pergola 
beautifully clothed in roses and wistaria. In this sweet-scented shade 
the path drops a bit down infrequent steps and curves a little to 





KIMBERLEY CREST, THE GARDEN HOME OF MR. AND MRS. KIMBERLEY OF REDLANDS. THE CENTRAL TREATMENT IS A WIDE WALK, WHICH, 
PASSING A FOUNTAIN, DIVIDES DOWN TWO FLIGHTS OF STAIRS AND, ENCIRCLING A LOTUS POOL. UNITES AGAIN UNDER THE PERGOLA 

CLOTHED IN ROSES AND WISTARIA 



6 



C A LI FOR A / A S <) ( ' T II L A \ D 




IN THE GARDEN OK KIMBERLEY CREST. DETAILS OF STONE SEATS AND JARS, FOUNTAIN AND 
PERGOLA ARE SET IN A LUXURIANT GROWTH OF SHRUBS AND VINES. WITH FAN PALMS 



come out on shady open spaces and a wide 
platform at the lower gate. Details of built-in 
seats, stone jars, and ivy-covered walls are 
here set in luxuriant growth of shrubs and 
flowers. Extending up the slope of lawn on 
the left a path for nature lovers wanders along 
the boundary planting, a good combination of 
trees and flowers and shrubs. The tall fan 
palms which are now taller than they appear 
in the illustration present interesting verticals 
in contrast to the prevailing horizontals of the 
valley and the distant view. Mrs. Kimberly's 
long devotion to her garden is felt everywhere. 

The gardens of Mrs. Jennie Davis on Brook- 
side avenue have several attractive features, 
one of which is, to my observation, unique. 
The garden is set in several acres of orange 
grove which has a big irrigation ditch run- 
ning through it. Mrs. Davis has used this as 
one might a brook and has planted it beauti- 
fully for a quarter of a mile or more. A path 
wanders up one side the stream and down the 
other, between flower and shrubs in masses or 
in singleness of beauty. We find an unusual 
wealth of deciduous shrubs, some of them most 
thrifty. The eastern barberry, styrax, for- 
sythia, Japonica, spiraeas, flowering cherry, 
and peach. There are occasional surprises as 
one strolls along — an ancient stone Buddha 
under the deodar, a colony of snowdrops by 
the way. The ditch itself was built by Indiana 
one hundred years ago. Mrs. Davis has en- 
closed it in cobblestones and concrete walls all 
overgrown with periwinkle and other creep- 
ers so that one sees, and hears, only the stream. 
There is another element of this garden which 
is of arresting beauty. One crosses, back of 
the house, a flower-covered terrace, then be- 
tween two fine old Italian cypresses bridges 
the stream and steps down into a green gar- 
den in which the elements are of the simplest 
and the effect of the noblest. A great, shady 
lawn, roughly circular, and in its center a cir- 
cular pool with simplest, sunken curb. The 
planting about this lawn is somehow peculiar- 
ly happy in effect; and it is of such shadiness 
and the trees so tall as to be difficult for the 
photographer, or, for those who feel its subtle 
charm, to describe it in words. One tower- 
ing eucalyptus holds a great wistaria vine, a 
marvel of bloom. At its foot some low palm 
clumps give piquancy. Opposite the entrance 
is a little view across deciduous foliage to a 
bl ight patch of sky. For the rest, just quiet 
green tree and shrub planting, no attempt at 
any color. 1 thought it very beautiful. 

There is one new garden in Redlands which 
is so individual in its treatment and so clever 



in the solution of its problem that it merits 
here some detail of description and more illus- 
trations. It belong to Mr. and Mrs. G. B. 
Montgomery on Highland avenue. The drive 
enters at the northwest corner, following the 
west and southern boundaries. The house 
stands in the inner angle at the southwest and 
the garage at the end of the drive in the south- 
east corner of the lot. The site chosen for the 
house was the largest part of the lot which 
slopes gradually to the east and north. By 
placing the house on this highest part and put- 
ting the axis on a diagonal they have accom- 
plished several things most desirable but with 
a minimum of grading, that source of trouble 



on our California soil. The house is therefore 
retired from the street, (b) the entrance to 
the house is attractive while at the same time 
the driveway intrudes itself not at all into 
the picture; (c) not an inch of garden space is 
wasted; (d) the house looks down over the 
garden in the most intimate connection with it; 
(e) the longest possible distance is obtained 
for the garden axis; (f) the side view of the 
garage has become an attractive feature: in- 
deed, the whole is a masterly treatment of a 
plot of land which is no larger than that 
which most people fritter away with a little 
grass plot here, a few shrubs and flowers 
there, and never a garden in the end. 




THE WEEPING WILLOW FORMS A DELIGHTFUL 
BACKGROUND FOR THE ANGULAR GARDEN 
HOUSE AT THE END OF THE MONTGOMERY 
GARDEN, REDLANDS CALIFORNIA 



THE NORTH FACE OF THE GARAGE IN THE 
MONTGOMERY GARDEN IS MOST INTERESTING 
IN TREATMENT. IT ADDS TO THE BEAUTY OF 
THE GARDEN OF WHICH IT IS DISTINCTIVE 



DETAIL OF THE CHARMING GARDEN HOUSE IN 
THE MONTGOMERY GARDEN, REDLANDS. CALI- 
FORNIA. IN ITS ANGULAR SPACE, FILLING 
THE CORNER OF THE LOT IS A LOCKED CLOSET 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



7 



BIRDS IN GARDENS 

By Theresa Homet Patterson 

THE quail hunted by man and beast, bird 
and reptile must needs have a large 
family or perish from the earth. Being a 
ground bird doubles the danger. 

Down in an Oak Knoll garden a new prece- 
dent is being established. When the family re- 
turned from the East one of the window boxes 
had taken on new beauty and interest in which 
the gardner had no part. A quail was setting- 
on tnirteen eggs. Twelve hatched, and shak- 
ing the brown fuzz dry they began shuttling 
back and forth in the long box, paying slight 
attention to the coaxing parents. They had 
no intention of making that fifteen foot leap 
to the ground until they had tried their wings. 
The temperature was one hundred. The next 
day was the same. The parents urged and 
coaxed and scolded. They brought some neigh- 
bors who flew up to the box and reasoned with 
the babies, telling them how little quail always 
left the nest at once to follow their parents in 
a search for a living. They hopped by turns 
onto the edge of the box and obeying the axiom 
to look before they leaped, hopped back. There 
was nothing to do but teach them to drink 
from the saucer and eat the food put in for 
them. The third day of the May heat-break- 
ing record they came down, two of them 
tumbling into the air-way where the gardner 
had to crawl under the house to rescue them. 
It was a relief to the family inside the big 
window, who had watched for three days, to 
have them safely landed. The next day father 
was seen leading five down the garden path 
while mother followed with seven on their way 
to the grain fields. A nest but a foot from the 
drive was deserted after the ninth egg. 

The family inside had just gotten back into 
the regular routine when two other window 
boxes were found with nests containing 
eighteen eggs each which meant doubling their 
anxiety as these also were second story boxes. 
One mother did not come back, (we hope no 
one ate her in nesting season!) but eighteen 
burst their shells in the other box and jumped 
right overboard at their father's bidding. 
Whether he was more convincing as to their 




GREAT TREES 



FOR FOREGROUND, WISTARIA AND ROSES FOR DRAPERY, MAKE OUR 
CALIFORNIA GARDENS THE LIVING ROOMS OF SUMMER 



duty, or whether they lacked the will power 
of nest number one we don't know. Two were 
killed, a third was badly injured and was ten- 
derly nursed in the house. 

I was sitting quietly under an arbor of a 
charming garden in the late afternoon. A 
quail flew onto the wall and scanned the gar- 
den. Seeing no one he called "All right here," 
at which a covey literally flowed over the wall. 
The cock took his position as guard on a small 
boulder while all hands got into a fresh bed of 
small plants where they made the dust fly in 
their dry cleaning process. This military 
guard never blinked an eye until relieved by 
another cock. I really listened for the click of 
their spurs so military was this attention and 
change of guard. The others kept up a low 



conversational chatter delightful to hear as it 
shows such contentment and joy in living. 
They rolled over on their sides and stretched 
their feet straight out. 

The mistress of the garden appearing saw 
her aster bed turned into a bathing beach. 
There was a "shoo" answered by a whirr, and 
no quail! What greater proof of dematerial- 
ization can any one want. One day when the 
house was alone a mother led her wee babies 
up the steps to the porch, apparently to give 
them a view of the promised land. 

The Mountain and Valley quail can be dis- 
tinguished by their millinery. The plume of 
the Mountain is pointed and turns back; that 
of the Valley is reversed, being largest at the 
end, and turns forward almost to the bill. 




ST. JAMES IN SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA, IS ONE OF THE BEST PLANTED PARKS IN THE STATE. IT GREETS THE VISITOR AS HE ENTERS THE 
BUSINESS DISTRICT FROM THE TRAIN, AND THE SANTA CLARA COUNTY COURTHOUSE FACES IT. THIS ENGRAVING AND TWO ON THE FOLLOWING 

PAGES ARE USED BY COURTESY OF THE SAN JOSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



C .1 I. I F R N I A S <> I T II I. .1 N D 



TRIBUTES TO THE CALIFORNIA TROUBADOUR 



ONE day last month a workingman in over- 
alls, soiled from his common tasks, stood 
outside the window of Robertson's bookstore in 
San Francisco. Mr. Robertson, watching him 
from within, saw that he was reading through 
to the end Clarence Urmy's Friend o' Mine re- 
printed from A California Troubadour. Sud- 
denly the man turned, entered the store, and 
bought the most beautiful copy extant of that 
universal tribute to Friendship, illumined and 
framed in permanent form. Indicative of the 
appreciation which has come to this first of 
our native California poets, the little story 
has prompted a desire on the part of his 
friends to collect and set in permanent form 
for all Californians and lovers of beauty, not 
only the finished verse and scattered short 
stories from his polished pen, but some mem- 
orial of that sensitive love of the sun- 
shine and flowers, the wooded dells 
and oak-embroidered hills of his na- 
tive state which make Clarence 
Urmy's songs remembered wherever 
and whenever California is loved and 
sung. 

He is The California Troubadour. 

Brave and debonair he passed his 
way among men in the varied phases 
of earthly existence. As child, before 
he spoke full sentences he sang; his 
girlish mother carrying the alto while 
he sang the air. She was his one and 
only Love. His songs were sung to 
her and, as a dear friend remembered 
— searching eargerly among the flow- 
er booths of his native city for violets 
to lay upon his bier — he wrote, "All 
flowers are sweet; but these fair blos- 
soms spread with dew, 
Call back the Mother eyes so sad, so 

sweet, so blue! 
I hear the echo of a song sung long 
ago 

As 'mid the nestling leaves it wanders 

to and fro; 
The while the perfumed dew falls on 

my heart like rain, 
And scent of violets — she loved them so! — 
gives pain." 

As a youth, saddened by the loss of this dear 
Mother when he was seventeen, he devoted 
himself to the study of music and began writ- 
ing verses before he left Napa College. Ever 
the necessity for a livelihood made of Music 
a handmaiden while his verse became the out- 
let for his spirit's hopes and joys. Through 
almost half a century of life crowded with 
study, pleasure, work, and the generous giving 
of himself, his talents, and his indomitable joy 
of life, to all about him, he wrote his songs 
and studied to perfect his art. 

Called to the church by a long line of mis- 
sionary ancestry from old Connecticut and 
Massachusetts reaching back to English Pur- 
itans and Cornish kings, he concentrated thir- 
ty years of his devoted effort to the training 
of choir boys — "his boys" — who now from far 
and near rise up to do him honor. Later sep- 
aration from this loved work gave his songs a 
sadder tone or found their motive in more spir- 
itual sphere. For, like the gallant Troubadour 
he was, he could not cease to sing. His verses 



found their place in every magazine of note 
throughout the country. And the joy their 
publication gave him did not become less as 
fortune favored him. One hundred poems in a 
month he sold once in New York where he had 
gone with a ripe season's vintage. After the 
Atlantic took a sonnet and Phi Beta Kappa 
called from Stanford for a finished, carefully 
constructed poem in praise of California, and 
San Francisco crowned him for his poem 
Peace, a perfect chant royale, he, who could 
never push for place among the propagandists 
felt the honor of his place, and when a com- 
placent anthologist once asked him for some 
verses for her book, drew back, writing, "I am 
not a modest violet, I'm a redwood" — in the 
field of California verse. 

His best verses, all the output of maturer 



WINGS 

Hr nr'tr is crowns J 
With immortality who fsars to follow 
It hrrr airy voietf lead. 

John Keats. 



A night in June. Fair Cynthia supplied 
Large pinions for my shoulders. Forth I fared 
To heights to which my spirit had not dared 
Ascend. With bated breath and wonder-eyed, 
Across the far, cerulean fields, through wide 
And glowing portals swiftly I repaired 
To distant orbs whose beacons flared 
A welcome. Voices called : "Abide! Abide!" 



THIS natal dream city with the towering 
hills, twin peaks, silhouetted against Cali- 
fornia's violet skies has receded from his 
poetic vision, alas! forever. * * * * 

He has laid down his facile pen and passed 
into the spirit regions to the comradeship of 
his beloved Keats and Shelley and others of 
the great legion of immortals. 

California loses one of her most distin- 
guished sons, a true troubadour, a knight of 
the order of the aristocracy of intellect, one of 
nature's noblemen, a man of infinite courtesy 
— -the greatest product of a great republic, a 
mind controlled by the most delicate imagina- 
tion and exalted ideals. 

The refined and sensitive note of his exquis- 
ite lute tenderly touched the cords of our 
hearts, appealing to our higher aspirations. 

The magic music of his muse like a 
radiant light illuminates dark paths 
leading to the bright fields of truth 
and beauty. 

Opening one of his dainty books was 
like entering into a fragrant garden 
in springtime, where art has ar- 
ranged with consummate simplicity 
the most charming flowers — one could 
not decide which was the loveliest. 



To earth I came. But since that night in June 
The wings are mine ! By right of accolade 
I carry keys to yonder bright abodes! 
Within my heart I hold the words and tune 
Saint Michael chanted to his lifted blade. 
I sing them to rough seas and rougher roads. 

Clarence Urmy 



years, cannot be found today between the cov- 
ers of a book. Published it was, but scattered 
in the journals, excepting these two poems 
here set forth and two found on his desk. One, 
dedicated to a little San Franciscan born just 
a few short weeks ago to one of his beloved 
"boys", and one, To u Young Poet, his last 
work, which like a mantle dropped from his 
spirit as it took its last, most valiant flight. 

Up from the scene of his long labors, to the 
little Episcopal Chapel in South San Francisco 
he went to meet his friends who came with 
their arms laden with flowers and their hearts 
with fond memories. Dean Gresham read the 
simple service of spiritual exaltation and eter- 
nal life, and quoted The Poet Touch, and, 
Things That Count. One of his beloved boys 
sang Peace, Perfect Peace 

The tributes from his multitude of friends, 
the lovers of his verse, and those to whom he 
gave himself unstintedly in teaching, have been 
manifold. It is not possible to print them all, 
but these that follow are the spontaneous 
heartfelt outpouring of his heart's friends, his 
brother troubadours in California. 



His supreme command of our lan- 
guage, in prose and verse, his broad 
humanity, his deep appreciation of 
nature, love of art and its exponents, 
his warm-hearted sincerity in bestow- 
ing freely enthusiastic praise where 
it was due, were some of many endear- 
ing traits of his fine character. 

We shall sadly miss him — but our 
sorrow will be softened by the 
thought of his life's completed mis- 
sion, for all his tasks were bravely 
wrought out to a finish. 

His poems, lyric legacies to us, 
came from his soul, clear cut as 
cameos — remain in the mind; the pur- 
ity of his motives and actions were 
an incentive to all. 

By his sojourn here, he left the 
world better than he found it, and we are all 
grateful, who heard his voice, felt his hand 
clasp, knew that intent face, read his inspira- 
tions. 

He dwelt among us, verily, a son of God — 
a follower of Christ, a high apostle of the true 
and the beautiful.— Claud H. Simson, in The 
San Jose Mercn ru-Herald. 

Clarence Urmy, Immortal 

CLARENCE Urmy has been gathered to his 
fathers. As poet, musician, critic, he no 
longer remains with us. Yet, though his poems 
be forgotten, his music no longer remembered, 
his criticisms pass the way of all that is mor- 
tal, though his very name be obliterated and 
the records of his birth and death be utterly 
destroyed he will still be with us to the end of 
the age. 

For it is the way of things that no influence 
shall ever pass away. No word that is ut- 
tered, no thought that flashes through the 
mind, no action that is performed, can pass 
away, but each and every one of those things 




— /. C. Liordon 

THE SANTA CLARA VALLEY IS VERY BEAUTIFUL IN SPRING WHEN THE FRUIT TREES ARE IN BLOOM. NEAR SARATOGA, CALIFORNIA. 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



9 



goes on till the all that is human shall have 
been forgotten. 

We all know of the mighty Bach, and his 
work and his name remain with us. But very 
few except erudite musicians know of those 
older musicians who stamped the image of 
their personality on Bach when he was a 
youth, and not even the most learned histor- 
ians could name those still older musicians 
who influenced Bach's predecessors. Yet, is it 
not true that the line of their in- 
fluence still remains unbroken? 

Through his position as organist 
of Trinity Church for thirty-three 
years Clarence Urmy set the stamp 
of his personality on many a boy 
who sang in his choir. Many a 
boy has gone out into the world 
better because of the fact that he 
knew Clarence Urmy. And though 
those boys should in no case have 
music as their life work the in- 
fluence of that music learned with- 
in the vineclad walls of Trinity is 
none the less real, and none the 
less permanent. Though Clarence 
Urmy's poems should no longer be 
read the influence of them will re- 
main, the suggestion of that poem 
published yesterday morning, after 
his death, that suggestion of "Smil- 
ing Death" will never pass away. 

In no theological sense do I 
speak, but of facts that can be 
known by unbelievers, Clarence 
Urmy is immortal. Musicians, a 
good man has gone from our num- 
ber. Let us pause a moment, bare 
our heads, receive our inspiration 
from his example, and do him 
honor! — Leroy V. Brant, Director 
of San Jose Institute of Music. 



those of speech began to "sever strings, seal 
lips and still his hands. 

So full of life, so dominant and self-con- 
tained among his own had he been always, and 
was for that day and the next, that realization 
of the blow he had received came slowly to us 
all. Yet in a week of desperate calls on scien- 
tific aid in all its phases, we could but watch 
the progress of the hemorrhage, and on June 
second, just at noon, as an old-fashioned clock 



THE POET AND HIS LUTE 

By CLARENCE URMY 

The Poet's lute, placed in his hands at birth, 
Is tuned to overtones unknown to Earth, 
Tunes that take wing from deftly fingered frets 
As perfume steals from bed of violets. 

The Poet draws from wire spun in a star 
The music of a mighty avatar, 

Like song of humming birds — throb, tiny throats ! — 
Too high for human ear, supernal notes. 

He wakes with magic touch his instrument 
To heavenly harmonies, rapt, eloquent — 
Dream-haunted strings that bear from far-off spheres 
Strange chords too glad for smiles, too sad for tears. 

He echoes airs that seraph tongues rehearse, 
And strives to blend them with his blissful verse — 
Elysian lyrics born of Flame and Dew, 
The faultless, ever-older, ever new. 



HE had been called to the Cathe- 
dral Choir of San Francisco, 
before and after he left Trinity. 
Just after Easter of this year the 
Dean and he conversed again upon 
the subject and he answered, "I 
cannot tell you what it means to 
me to have you ask me, Mr. Gresham; but I 
am too worn and tired to undertake it, I am 
not equal to it now." 

Suddenly, at noon on May twenty-fifth at 
the corner of First and Santa Clara streets, 
the very scene of his intense short story, In 
the Midst of Life, Death stood "at his worn 
portal" calling him. Gently at first its finger 
lay upon his lips, and tangled speech. But 
thinking, as always, of his duty not of him- 
self, he took a brief luncheon with his brother 
Percival, congenial comrade of his later years, 
and went back to his class at the State 
Teacher's College. Gently again The Finger 
touched his power of speech; and pupils, eager 
though they were to understand — could not. 
Seeing their perplexity he essayed to make his 
meaning clear and spoke some said, in French, 
a rapid explanation. Seeing his troubled state, 
one, quick-witted, kind, said, "Mr. Urmy, the 
bell has rung," and the class filed softly out. 
Brave and determined to the last, careful of 
other's plans, he put away his books, laid down 
his baton, and obeyed the gentle summons 
which spreading to the motor nerves from 



Thus round the Poet's lute fond Fancies throng 
Awaiting dulcet trysting-time with Song, 
Till smiling Death at his worn portal stands 
To sever strings, seal lips, and still his hands. 



in the house nearby struck twelve, his last 
short breath passed out on the soft air of his 
beloved California. 

The story Edward F. O'Day has told with 
such rare sympathy was published in The 
Argonaut of January twenty-second, nineteen 
sixteen and will be reprinted presently in full 
as a brochure of San Francisco. Excepting 
for a few, still unbound, copies of A California 
Troubadour published by Robertson, Mr. 
Urmy's books are out of print, although two 
new books almost ready for the press lay wait- 
ing for the time and thought which he had 
been unable to take from lecture courses, music- 
lessons and dramatic writing filling up his 
daily round. 

The California Troubadour 

CLARENCE Urmy, the California trouba- 
dour, is dead at San Jose. Born in 
San Francisco 10 years after the discovery of 
gold, he was in the truest sense a California 
poet, and all who know his work will agree 
that he was one of the sweetest singers we 
ever had. 



Urmy liked to regard himself as a trouba- 
dour. It is a modest designation, and in 
Urmy's case very appropriate. For he was a 
very modern Blondel, singing his songs under 
the windows of the prisoners of care, showing 
the way to escape from the thralldom of our 
materialistic existence. 

Urmy loved to tell the story of the day that 
he was born, a charming story with a trouba- 
dour motif. 

"The day that I was born," he 
said, "a French street singer wan- 
dered over Rincon Hill. Through 
Folsom, Harrison and Bryant 
Streets, through First, Second and 
Hawthorne Streets, he sang his 
troubadour lays, and passing out 
through South Park into Third 
Street, was lost in the endless pro- 
cession of hurrying humanity, om- 
nibuses, hacks, express wagons and 
drays." 

That was Urmy's story. This is 
how his mother told him the story 
of the day that he was born: 

"Your coming into the world was 
heralded by some beautiful sing- 
ing, some French songs delightful- 
ly sung by a wandering trouba- 
dour. Only a little while before 
you were born the singer stood 
close by our front door, and sang 
looking up at my bedroom window. 
I was, oh, so anxious to have a 
look at him! So your father gent- 
ly moved my bed over to the win- 
dow. I leaned far enough over to 
catch a glimpse of his long-plumed 
hat, gay cloak and old guitar. Just 
at that moment, he glanced up at 
the window, threw me a kiss, and 
ran quickly down the street, fol- 
lowed by a crowd of children and 
grown people. We heard him sing- 
ing in the next block, then faintly 
again over the brow of the hill, 
and then .... not long after 
. . . . in a few hours, you were 

born." 

Years after Clarence Urmy was given a 
copy of the Alta Calif ornian, dated July 11, 
1858, containing the news of the day that he 
was born. He found this item: 

Death of a Troubadour. — Yesterday af- 
ternoon at Third and Silver Streets a 
strolling singer, known as "French Louis," 
was knocked down by the International 
Hotel 'bus, and fatally iniured. He was 
carried to the drug store at the southeast 
corner of Third and Folsom Streets, where 
he expired a little before 6 o'clock. It 
was reported that he had been singing all 
afternoon in the vicinity of Rincon Hill. 
Just before the singer exnired he managed 
to unclasp a locket which was tied about 
his neck and which contained the picture 
of a comely young woman. He pressed it 
to his lips, and very faintly, half whis- 
pered, half sang a little refrain in French 
interpreted: "My soul to God, my faith to 
the King, but my heart is thine forever." 




A— 



if ii tr 




-/. C. Cor,!n» 

THE STATE TEACHERS' COLLEGE AT SAN JOSE WAS DESIGNED BY THE STATE ARCHITECT AND IS NOTABLY GOOD AND EFFECTIVE 



10 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



The whole incident so impressed 
Clarence Urmy that he was in- 
spired, like Francois Villon, to 
write his "Last Testament." It 
was written in French, and begun 
thus: Mes chansonnettes aux beaux 
oiseaux, 

Mes reves doux aux fleurs; 
Mes sourires aux esprits des eaux, 

Mes cris au ciel en pleurs, 
Mon ame a Dieu, ma foi au roi, 

Mon coeur, mon coeur toujours a 
toi! 

He Sang California 

There are on my shelves three 
treasured volumes of Clarence 
Urmy's poetry: "A Rosary of 
Rhyme," published by "Joe" Win- 
terburn in 1884, "A Vintage of 
Verse," published by dear old 
Doxey in 1897, and "A California 
Troubadour," published by the 
only "Aleck" Robertson in 1912. 

All through these books there is 
beautiful poetry about the state 
that Urmy loved. He never tired 
of singing of San Francisco and 
Tamalpais, the Napa Valley and 
Santa Cruz, the Contra Costa 
Hills and Livermore and Los Gatos. 

Some of his poems you will find 
in the national anthologies. After 
the Armistice his chant royal, 
"Peace," won first prize in a Cron- 
icle poetry competition. Of late 
years Urmy was music and dra- 
matic critic for the San Jose Mer- 
cury, and he was a teacher of music too, but 
he never ceased to be the California trouba- 
dour.— Edwi,i F. O'Day in The Oakland Post- 
Enquirer. 





WHITE IRIS IN BLOOM ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY WHERE A HIGH FENCE AND TREES MAKE SHADE 
FOR BULBS AND CALIFORNIA WILD FLOWERS THAT LOVE IT 



GARDEN OF MISS ANNA HEAD 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 



THE CIRCULAR SEAT BEYOND THE ROSE GARDEN IS BACKED BY A 
HIGH HEDGE AND FLOWERING SHRUBS 





IN THE ROSE GARDEN, WITH ITS LOW CUT BOX-HEDGES AND PATHS. 
ONE FINDS A SUNNY SEAT, OR SHELTER 



WISTARIA ON THE PERGOLA MAKES A PICTURE FROM THE LOGGIA. 
WHICH OPENS FROM THE DINING ROOM TO THE SOUTH 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



11 



rri HE garden of 
JL Miss Anna 
Head, President of the 
Garden Club of Ala- 
meda County, is a 
small garden listed in 
the Garden Club of 
America as one to be 
visited on the Pacific 
Coast. Miss Head has 
recently sold this place 
in Berkeley, and as sev- 
eral changes are being 
made, necessitated by 
the building of a gar- 
age, the garden will be 
taken off the eastern 
list. 

M a n y changes in 
Berkeley gardens also 
result from the build- 
ing of the new Univer- 
sity Stadium. 

The Alameda Coun- 
ty Garden Club will 
visit the beautiful 
estate of Air. and Mrs. 
Charles D. B I a n e y, 
Saratoga, Santa Clara 
County, in the Fall. 




THE EAST FRONT OF THE COTTAGE OF MISS ANNA HEAD, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA. RATCLIFFE, ARCHITECT. 



THE DISTINCTIVE CALIFORNIA GARDEN *, allison m. woodman 



PART I 

WHAT constitutes the California garden, 
as distinguished from the Eastern type 
of garden ? There is a distinct charm about 
the old New England garden, full of trim little 
paths laid out in regular fashion, seats, trel- 
lises, arches, and arbors in set places, garden 
plots filled with old-fashioned, sweet-scented 
flowers, which is not difficult to feel. Likewise 
is felt the beauty of the formal garden so 
prevalent in the East, with the garden set out 
in regular fashion, and possessing fountains, 
pools, pergolas, sun-dials, moss-filled stepping- 
stone or brick walks — the while appearing to 
be but an extension of the house. 

It is freedom from conventionality, rather 
than freedom from restraint, that character- 
izes true Californians. It is this spirit which 
is reflected in California gardens. In the ex- 
treme East the spirit which prevails is that of 



"you must do this and you mustn't do that; 
observe all of the proprieties; do not deviate 
an inch from the accepted line of traditional 
conduct." Here in the West we are tempted 
to go to the other extreme — to break entirely 
away from established precedent and custom. 
But there is an obvious danger in this atti- 
tude, which must be guarded against in mat- 
ters of gardening. 

In California, I believe, the trend is to- 
wards a distinct informality in most of our 
plantings. And yet, even in informality there 
must be some semblance of unity of purpose 
and conception — in fact it is really much 
more difficult to form an informal than a 
formal setting. Sometimes the wisest pro- 
cedure seems to be to strike a happy medium 
between the two — to include the best features 
of the formal garden, giving them an infor- 
mal, intimate setting. In other words, we re- 



move the austerity of too formal a treatment 
by adding a touch here and there of infor- 
mality. 

All this pertains to gardens, adjuncts to 
residences informal in character. Gardens im- 
mediately adjoining residences of classic de- 
sign, naturally would conform in their lines 
and general scale to those of the residences, 
or else the classic beauty of the latter would 
be vitiated or lost. A gradual transition could 
then be effected from the formal to the more 
informal parts of the grounds. It is this lack 
of feeling for the proper relation of house 
and garden, that, in many instances, has prac- 
tically destroyed any sense of harmony be- 
tween the two. 

Fortunately, in California we try to present 
our best front to the public, but I believe it is 
in good taste to supply some sort of hedge or 
(Continued on Page 19) 





LOOKING SOUTH THROUGH THE PILLARS OF THE LOGGIA TO THE 
FOUNTAIN BETWEEN THE SIDES OF THE VINE-COVERED PERGOLA 



THE CHARM OF THIS GARDEN IS THE CLOSE RELATION BETWEEN 
THE HOUSE AND ITS ENVIRONMENT, EVOLVED BY THE OWNER 



12 



C .1 I. I F o R X I .1 S <> I ' T If I. A V /) 




The Monroe Doctrine 

MARKING the end of colonial development on earth the 
Monroe doctrine is well worthy of a centennial cele- 
bration in the land where East meets West and the world is 
encircled by civilization. 

That no more so-called "discovery" of new territory 
should give any nation the right to that territory was the 
ultimatum and real significance of the Monroe Doctrine. 
Its vital issue has been clouded by many side interpreta- 
tions; but it now stands forth in emphasis as the beginning 
of an era in which the right of nations to be free and 
equal is seen and acknowledged. 

It takes centuries to develop ideals among people of 
one race: how long then, must we look for the development 
of every nation of the earth to the point now attained by 
the few? That a standard is set and human rights acknowl- 
edged are the encouraging facts we celebrate this month in 
the Centennial centered in Los Angeles by the nations of 
the Americas. 

What we need to see, and what this celebration may 
show us, is the mutual advantage of giving. Each nation- 
has much which it alone can give to the world in the arts 
of life. More and more as these arts, which are the 
development of necessity in food, clothing and shelter, be- 
come crvstalized in any race that race has something to 
give to other races. Selfish hoarding of that treasure has 
resulted in war and devastation. Selfishness in hiding from 
other nations any advantage gained in commerce or in 
science is the trap which holds a nation in the grip of the 
dark ages. 

The open door, the open shop, the open mind, the open 
heart, which give to all equal opportunity to live and work 
and develop; these are the motives of the new century in 
which the rights of all nations are being adjusted and each 
is called on to contribute to the progress of all. 

Noblesse Oblige, Physicians and Surgeons! 

THE commercializing of a noble profession has scattered 
the knowledge once held in secret by the "medicine 
man" of anv tribe. Half truths are dangerous things ; they 
mislead those who trust to the wise as their leaders; they 
make arrogant those who possess them . Because the pro- 
fession of conserving health in humanity has given to the 
world free access to its hard-earned and important discov- 
eries in the art of well-living is the very reason why it 
should step up instead of down in its ideals and, leaving 
general axioms of health to be conventionalized by the 
multitude, draw a sharp line between ignorance and author- 
itv, skill and mere bungling. 

The public mind is very confused on the subject of 
doctors. Who is a doctor and who is not a doctor? Who 
is worthy to be entrusted with the life of our dear one, 
and who is selfishly thinking of his own purse and his own 
political advancement when he takes the life of a fellow 
citizen in his hands? 

These are questions which make the position of doctor 
in the community a very critical and important one. Re- 
sponsibility for the proper adaptation of the medical pro- 
fession to our new community life rests upon the Profession 
of Medicine as such. The Red Cross work, through the 
war and since, has done much to standardize the conserva- 
tion of health, not only in community health but in indi- 
viduals. But first aid to the injured is only one phase of 
succor to the sick and wounded. The next step, "Consult 
your physician" is the one most surrounded by difficulties. 
There are phvsicians and physicians; doctors and near- 
doctors; and consultation is the most terrible risk if one 
does not know a physician when he sees one. Most people 
do not know a doctor from a pseudo-doctor; and there is 
no one on earth who can enlighten them but the medical 
profession acting as a whole or in a representative Institute 
such as exists in the profession of architecture. 



The state has no basis of wisdom by which to make laws 
on the subject of health excepting the basis given it by the 
profession of medicine. Our democratic ideals should be 
restricted to the field of politics, and not to our schools of 
learning. A great republic is not evolved by continually 
levelling down to the intelligence and skill of the least gifted 
worker in any trade or profession. No one man can know 
everything in every line; division of labor makes for effi- 
ciency in the life of the community. In any great depart- 
ment of work, therefore, it is necessary that the workers 
set their own standard and hold themselves responsible 
for its upholding. Leadership, since time immemorial, has 
evolved within the tribe, the guild, or the profession ; and, 
for the present, at least, there is no such thing as democracy 
of intellect. 

Free and equal in opportunity we all are in California, 
but freedom of opinion is a different thing. Judged by the 
demands of a community of free men the opinion of the 
expert is the only one of any value. We train our own 
experts in schools of a republic. Our first concern in these 
United States was to see that every one had equal oppor- 
tunity to learn to be intelligent ; our second effort is now 
concentrated on seeing that each unit in the republic, or in 
the community, is given opportunity to find his best func- 
tion. Too little attention has been given to this feature of 
education because the idea of giving everything known to 
man to every student has been carried too far in our public- 
school system ; and education has, therefore, become super- 
ficial and useless to the nation. 

Applying this theory to the practice of medicine, we 
see that it is in the schools of medicine that a severe stan- 
dard must be set and that a government "by the people, 
of the people, and for the people" must secure the best by 
acknowledging that all men are not equally fitted to be 
doctors, and that the best minds in the profession must be 
allowed, nay, forced to decide what is best. 

We must continue to give every American child an 
education, but we must also teach that child to respect 
expert advice in all other lines than the one in which he 
himself is an expert. Not only so, but we must train ex- 
perts in every line who are worthy of the respect of the 
whole community. It is impossible for the general public 
to know the difference between an expert research man 
and a diagnostician. The one should be booked for the 
laboratory where he cannot meddle with the critical emer- 
gencies of life and death of our citizens. So long as the 
word "doctor" is applied indiscriminately, the state, with 
its citizens consenting, will make the mistake of placing in 
authority over our children and teachers in schools, one 
who does not know an emergency case from a chronic condi- 
tion or a stroke of paralysis from a nervous breakdown. 
Valuable lives are lost, children are left to grow up deformed 
and handicapped because thei'e is no Institute of Physicians 
and Surgeons in California which dares to organize and 
speak with authority on the vital subjects of life and death. 

Our Artists 

IN all arts and sciences, as well as in the acknowledged 
professions, it is necessary that standards be uplifted 
if all men are to be drawn to a higher level in education 
and enjovment. There is an American Institute of Archi- 
tecture, and though it may remain remote and academic, 
its influence is felt throughout the country. There is also 
an American National Academy of Art. Members of this 
honorable body are scattered all over the United States 
and Europe, studying, painting, teaching. In Los Angeles 
there are practicing several score of architects who have 
been honored as members of the Institute, and A. I. A. is 
written after their names. Los Angeles' civic center and 
all her public buildings of note are still to be built. In the 
hands of these men, functioning through the Los Angeles 
Association of Allied Architects, this city will have the 
best effort of all its best architects concentrated in our new 
civic buildings. No such splendid combination of skill and 



CALIFORNIA SOUTHLAND 



13 




community work was ever before witnessed. Los Angeles 
will within the next decade, become a very beautiful city. 

In the field of Art why cannot the same splendid effort 
to set a high standard and make Los Angeles an art center 
be consummated ? 

Mr. Antony Anderson, the able art critic of the Los 
Angeles Times, and himself an artist of no mean talent, 
holds up to scathing criticism an article on the study of 
art which appeared in the June number of this journal. 
He asks whether the editor of California Southland or 
Mr. Cannell, who is doing so much to bring good paintings 
from Eastern and Western studios to Los Angeles, shall 
be the judge of what is good in our art. He says, after 
quoting our little article, "From all of which we are driven 
to the conclusion that" — the writer — "does not consider 
the landscapes of William Wendt, Elmer Wachtel, Marion 
Kavanagh Wachtel, Jack Wilkinson Smith, Hanson Puthuff, 
Benjamin Brown, et al., either local or worthwhile." 

Mr. Anderson is the best man in Los Angeles to choose 
the founders of our Los Angeles Academy of Painting. He 
has chosen well ; and if he will include in his "et al." the 
names of a few more, like Alson Clark and Jean Mannheim, 
he will crystalize in this city the floating ideals of our art 
around a group of men whom this journal has never ceased 
to set before the community as leaders and teachers and 
standard-bearers whose work is worthy of recognition in 
our own academy or any other because it is not only local 
and worthwhile, but universal in its technique and mastery. 

Part of a Sunrise Sermon 

Preached on Mount Davidson, San Francisco, by J. Wilbur Gresham, 
Dean of the Pro-Cathedral 

HOW fitting, then, that in this great city by the western 
sea, without distinction of creed or class or circum- 
stance, Jew and Gentile, Anglican, Roman Catholic and 
Protestant, high and low, rich and poor, young and old, 
should gather under this cross and round this mountain 
altar, as citizen and brethren, to dedicate the loftiest and 
noblest of our San Francisco summits to Him "Who is living 
and was dead, and is alive f orevermore !" 

There is an ancient Masonic legend which says that the 
temple-builders, in the absence of Hiram Abiff, the archi- 
tect, threw away a keystone which he had designed and 
cut. They threw it away because of its extraordinary and 
peculiar shape. It was not oblong, neither was it square. 
It would not fit into the wall, nor did it seem to belong any- 
where else. As the great building arose, without sound of 
ax or hammer, this curious stone seemed useless. But one 
day its need was felt and its proper place was found. It 
was raised to the top of the arch. "The stone which the 
builders rejected" became the head corner-stone, the key- 
stone of the arch. 

Again and again the builders of civilization have sought 
to rear the mighty temple of human life and